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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent DVD - a must for fans of electronic music
I found the first reviewer's comments very helpful. I would draw your attention to the last few lines of the A&E cable company's comments made a few days ago......" Two former members of Kraftwerk indeed participate which helps, however, it is a shame that you do not get added insight from the leaders and creators of the band and that it is not a completely authorized...
Published on 2 Mar 2009 by Sal Paradise

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution
I love Kraftwerk, I have seen them live once and got all of the albums. But this DVD is long and boring; 180 mins. With too many interviews. The only worth while interview you should listen to is Karl Bartos who was Actually in the group. Plus, I dos'nt mention one word about Electric Cafe (Techno Pop) or The Mix. It goes from Computer World straight to Tour de France. I...
Published 9 months ago by Freddie Cox


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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent DVD - a must for fans of electronic music, 2 Mar 2009
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This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
I found the first reviewer's comments very helpful. I would draw your attention to the last few lines of the A&E cable company's comments made a few days ago......" Two former members of Kraftwerk indeed participate which helps, however, it is a shame that you do not get added insight from the leaders and creators of the band and that it is not a completely authorized documentary. With that said, you will not find a more complete history of both Kraftwerk and the era of electronic music." I would say
anyone who isn't happy with this product must be impossible to please - What I mean by this is that I saw comments elsewhere saying the Title of the DVD was a little misleading. It is about the history of serious electronic music AND how Kraftwerk fit into this history. There is a huge chunk of the 3 hours devoted to Kraftwerk.
Also someone complained some of the archive film was a bit grubby... I would say the sound and vision throughout this documentary are Excellent!! You cannot take old footage of a club filmed IN THE 1960's (!) and make it look like it was filmed for IMAX cinema today no matter how hard you try.
I have been a fan of Kraftwerk from the day I bought Autobahn in the mid 1970's and I would recommend this DVD. The extras are interesting, too.
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53 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More than just Kraftwerk, 23 Sep 2008
By 
John Malcolm (Swindon, Wilts, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
Having watched the whole documentary, I feel there are a couple of points that are worthing noting for potential buyers - neither of which should put you off, though.

First, the disc is in 4:3 format - fine if you have a square telly, but on a widescreen telly with the top and bottom chopped a bit (to avoid black bars left and right) the captions for interviewees are chopped a bit.
Second, some of the videos for the songs are of poor quality. I know this is old film from the 70s but surely there are better prints available?

OK, so whinges out of the way, on to the good stuff. This is an excellent documentary. The first hour or so sets the scene, with the historical setting and also the way German musicians (and youth) handled the post-war years. This is followed by the beginnings of electronic music (not just in Germany, although there is that bias) with interviews with a lot of the early musicians (Klaus Schulze and Conrad Schnitzler amongst others) as well as various music journalists and technical staff. All good stuff, but if you're waiting for the Kraftwerk bit then it is a bit tedious.

Finally we get to Kraftwerk and the context of their music, working through all the albums from Tone Float to Computer World (almost no Electric Cafe - pity - and a very small mention of Tour De France Soundtracks) with contributions from Karl Bartos and Rusty Egan, amongst others. This concentrates on the earlier albums - up to and including The Man Machine - in great detail and is informative, if a little long.

The opinions from the interviewees are interesting and varied, and in the Extras there is a little (5 min) feature about Dusseldorf vs Berlin electronic music, as well as an extended interview with Karl Bartos.

So, to sum up, a good disc, although the documentary is a little long at 3 hours. Good job there are plenty of chapters, so you can remember where you got to instead of having to start again! I'm glad I bought and watched it, and if you have an interest in Kraftwerk and/or German electronic music then it's well worth considering.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for anyone interested in this era. 5 Stars!, 23 Jun 2009
By 
M. A. L. KANOO "Desertwind" (Abu Dhabi, UAE) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
One of my favorite albums growing up was The Man Machine. So when I learned that Kraftwerk were to be performing on July 2nd (2009)as the opening gig at the Manchester Festival I wanted to learn more.

The DVD is a comprehensive review of the genre. It is 3 hours long and is an excellent documentary of the times, the music, the people. I found it to be fascinating and (it) filled in many, many wide gaps of my musical knowledge from my youth.

Absolute 5 Stars.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Definitely worth buting, 9 Jan 2010
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This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
An excellent survey of the era. Good historical information and some superb archive film. It makes some very erudite connections between the pop and classical genres. However, beware of the incompetent and pathetic contributions by so-called expert David Stubbs. It will soon become obvious that he knows nothing and peppers his contributions with a plethora of 'sort ofs' and 'kind ofs' - not the type of commentary expected from someone who is supposedly and expert. Every time he appears go for the fast forward button and save yourself the time-wasting and useless comments he so pointlessly makes.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars excellent if long history of the Krautrock scene, 15 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
This fine 3 hour documentary looks at the history of German electronic/experimental music, which came to be called rather simplistically Krautrock, and focuses on the band who achieved the greatest worldwide success, Kraftwerk. As a history of German post-war experimentalism it touches most bases, including the electronic pioneer & composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, the commune-led experimentation in the late 60s of Amon Duul and the like, and the scenes springing up in various West German towns including Dusseldorf, home of The Organization, who would become Kraftwerk of course. There's archive live footage, much of it familiar from YouTube it must be said, of other bands too, including Can, Tangerine Dream, Cluster & Popol Vuh, and interviews with Roedilius and Moebius (Cluster), Klaus Schultz (hilariously dismissive of TD's first efforts when he was with them), and Karl Bartos among others. But this is not an official Kraftwerk-approved product, as it says on the box, so don't expect interviews with Ralf or Florian. Bartos gets plenty of interview time though (and there's extra bonus material from him too on his time in the band - an interview called I Was A Robot) and, though probably prohibited from gossiping about the bosses, he's an engaging interviewee and reveals some interesting stuff. I loved the revelation that once when Kraftwerk were in Paris they visited a mega-disco and watched as Trans Europe Express completely emptied the dance floor. There's informative input from various cultural critics of course, including evaluation of Kraftwerk's progress in the context of other music at the time. For example, TEE was not a big seller, and the sudden success in 1977 of Giorgio Moroder with I Feel Love rather sidelined Kraftwerk, so Ralf & Florian responded by co-opting Bartos into the composing and aiming for the dance floor more directly with The Model and the overtly electronic Man Machine album. Any gripes? There's a section on how Richard Branson's Virgin label signed German bands such as TD, giving them their biggest platform and success to date, but absolutely no mention of one of their other signings, Faust, surely one of THE pre-eminent and most influential experimental bands of that era. And the doc does segue a little awkwardly from being a thorough history of German electronic music into concentrating solely on Kraftwerk, with just a few side-swipes at TD losing their edge and making background music instead. It's also a good hour before we see anything of KW (or rather The Organization) at all. Karl Bartos gives nothing away about the construction of their electronic drums or other home-made instruments and the end is rather hurried: there's no analysis of 1983s Tour de France single, no mention at all of Techno Pop/Electric Cafe and just a brief mention at the end of the "warm response" given by critics to 2003s Tour de France Soundtracks album. (OK, Bartos DOES spill the beans on the Techno Pop debacle and The Mix in the extras, but I would have thought some of his comments merited inclusion in the main documentary). All in all though, a respectful and engaging documentary which covers Kraftwerk's origins and progress up until Computer World very well and a strong, if incomplete, resume of the 70s experimental music scene.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, 8 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
Delivered to time and cost.

Wonderful look at Kraftwerk. Major influence on the music scene through the decades.

Recomend especially to fans of the band.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Essential for fans for Krautrock, 8 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
Fans of Can, Kraftwerk, Tangerine Dream and others will really enjoy this DVD.

I came to it as a Kraftwerk fan and have since listened to many of the albums by the other artists mentioned in the film. I have discovered new things as a result of watching this.

It starts off really slowly and the first third drags a little. Once you hit the early to mid-seventies then it becomes really good. If anything I would like to have seen a bit more at the end dealing with the 80s and 90s. Perhaps the film could have been in two parts or even three.

Of course the Ralf and Florian do not take part but Bartos does.

One amusing moment is when the random keyboard player from Soft Cell criticizes Duran Duran for doing one tour where they paid homage to Kraftwerk. A bit of sour grapes there and entirely different from Gary Numan, for example, who lifted their whole act. One of many interviews that seem slightly unedited and a little rushed at the end.

Next time I watch the first third of the film will probably seem quicker because I have now taken a wider sample of Krautrock.

Only downsides are the slow beginning, the fragmented and rushed ending and the lack of Kraftwerk personnel. I would definitely like to know where the guys are at today and how they feel about themselves and times passed. Where is the new music?
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An MA in Kraftwerk!!!, 21 Sep 2011
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Devil's Advocate (Over your shoulder!) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
Only 5 reviews. Wow, nice to see that Kraftwerk, at least on DVD, are still a minority interest.
If you need my creds, well "Computer Love" makes me cry, "Neon Lights" makes me look out my window and gaze into the night, "Trans Europe Express" roars into my mind every time I walk along a European train platform. "Radioactivity" is the most poignant, sad and yet glorious album in existence.
In short, the A to Z of music is contained in Kraftwerk for me.
They set such standards of melody, harmony, elegy and subtle humour that all others sound bogus and contrived.
Next month I'm paying homage by finally visiting Dusseldorf where you might just see me in der Altstadt drunk on love of this group. My homage. My Haj. Join me for a drink if you will.
I loved this DVDF. It takes patience and rewards you in return. We go way back. Down into the impenetrable misty caverns of flares, bad hairdos and concept albums. Deeper and deeper. Can, Tangerine dream, Stockhausen, all that once intolerable hippy crap now forms an essential backdrop to the genesis of die meistermensche Kraftwerk.
I'm an old punk whose loathing of hippies dies hard. This DVD taught me that my heroes were a product of their contemporaries but so much more than that.
The commentators on the DVD are extremely inciteful, both on individual tracks and albums. Karl Barthos is extensively interviewed in his wonderfully suave English. It's about as close as you'll get to life at the heart of Kraftwerk.
So many jewels are cast about that it makes you want to gather all your (unwilling) friends for a dinner party where you can let forth on the history of Kraftwerk.
I loved this DVD. I doubt if there's an equal with such passionately committed contributors. Kein Florian und kein Ralf aber es machts nichts.
You have the music. You have the videos. Now learn the story. And come to Dusseldorf. I'll be waiting.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars German pioneers profiled., 7 Oct 2012
This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
It would have been nice if Ralph and Florian had participated. Overall though it is a very interesting look at Kraftwerk and Krautrock in general.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars just a comment on min max dvd concert, 15 July 2012
This review is from: Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution [2008] [DVD] [NTSC] (DVD)
the other dvd minimum maximum just buy it. trust me. i played it on 50inch with 5.1 surround. just amazing. loved it.
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