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3.8 out of 5 stars
Kidulthood [DVD]
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on 14 June 2014
I brought this when first came out in 2006 when in college the acting is very well rehersed and noal clark directing is good. As well as playing a part in the film ive got the original and had to get the directors cut for the extra seanes so it was worth the buy
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 6 July 2007
This film is realistic, raw and shocking, but with the way youths are carrying on today it needs to be. It gives a realistic reflection of some of the issues kids have to deal with as well as the lack of guidance they have, as some of the parents' characters in the film turn a blind eye to what is going on. The film itself has a brilliant plot covering a number of storylines throughout. The acting is amazing considering the faces are not recognisable and the directing is raw and edgy. A film like this needs to be publicised more because with all the negative issues being highlighted in the press, such as gun crime, the media fails to cover the deep rooted issues behind why kids fall into this behaviour. It may be a sad film but its true to life and that is what makes it even more sad.
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on 14 January 2014
when i got the item and when i opend it up the disc is all scratched and on amazon it said it was used but good condition

i recormend this to no one
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 31 July 2006
For someone who is about to eneter teaching in Central London, I felt compelled to see this film.

My first comment would have to be that it is much better than i envisaged and I found it very hard hitting. Not as hard hitting as "Kids", although this is a good thing as I have never being able to see that film since....it shocked me too much. However "Kidulthood" really does make you cringe at the violence and bullying which opens the film.

From then on in you are taken on a day trip through London, seen through the eyes of a group of 15 year old delinquents. The characterisation is very strong and in some places you feel that if these children were from different backgrounds, then they really wouldn't be so bad.

A very good film.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 23 February 2007
ive just finished watchin this film at school and i have to say i was suprised to find that it was actually really good.

i am not one for gangster films and do not consider myself a chav, but i enjoyed this film and am now going to buy it.

the repetitiveness of 'blud' and 'breh' and the rest of the chavvy lingo does become progressively annoying, but can be put up with. the only thing that confused me was the constant 'boxfresh' logo on caps and hoodies and shirts etc. was this film sponsored by boxfresh?

i would definetly recommend this film to anyone who is concerned with todays youthful society
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Britain's answer to Larry Clark's Kids, Kidulthood works hard for realism and shock value but falls somewhere in between. Story focuses on a group of London youngsters who have been given the day off school when one of their classmates commits suicide after being bullied. The various groups of friends spin off to do their own thing, which invariably involves drugs, violence, casual sex, teenage pregnancy angst, revenge and lots of cussing in street speak. All this is crammed into a 24 hour period, suggesting that the yoof of today never live a dull moment when not at school.

Writer Noel Clarke (who also stars) and director Menhaj Huda clearly want to keep things raw and authentic, but it eventually comes off as wholly unbelievable. In fact it at times feels like it's a bunch of mates making a film and living out some fantasies where they get to be wicked for a day. There's some messages in the mix trying to break out of the hysteria, to be a wake-up call to parents and elders as to what is happening under our noses, but ultimately sensationalism wins the day.

It's a film strung together by a number of instances, characterisation and reasoning is given short shrift, the makers over egging the pudding in their unrelenting mission to shock. Some scenes are undeniably attention grabbing, while the soundtrack pulses away with verve and Brian Tufano's cinematography is right on the money, but come the preachy finale you may feel you really haven't learnt anything new about the unruly and unfeeling kids of today. 6/10
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 22 April 2013
Kidulthood is a highly intelligent snapshot of some sections of British youth (I am tempted to say "urban youth", but I won't, for reasons I'll make clear later) in the early 21st century. According to director, Menhaj Huda, in an interview included with this special edition, its reception in 2006 was mixed, with some of the media saying it was unrealistic, then making qualified retractions after wider popular acclaim for the film. It works as a drama not because of the brilliance of the acting (although, notwithstanding some of the assessments on Amazon, the standard is very high), but because of the script. From the start we are confronted with two estranged lovers, and Noel Clarke's convincing writing draws us in. Kidulthood isn't a modern-day Romeo and Juliet, because both protagonists come from the same world, but it is easily affecting enough to hold an audience's attention for 91 minutes.

Kidulthood belongs to the genre of movies like Scum, East is East, Cathy Come Home, and also television dramas like The Wire: Complete HBO Season 1-5 [DVD], all of which depict social problems from a detached perspective as a means of provoking audiences to think. In this respect, it compares closest with The Wire, although obviously there isn't space for it to become as deep or wide-ranging.

Yet whereas The Wire was accompanied by community debates as to what public policy solutions might be found, and even whether the problems had been accurately identified, there hasn't been anything like this with Kidulthood (although Noel Clarke does field questions as "What do you think of the government's response?" in the DVD Extras). Probably the reason for this is the relative apathy that greeted the film on its initial release. In an interview included with this DVD, director Menhaj Huda still seems a little put out (not unjustifiably) that "not one" film festival decided to include it in its programme.

Quite a lot of the one-star reviews here on Amazon claim the film is "unrealistic" or "about chavs" and therefore not worth bothering with. This was in 2006-07. I wonder how many people hold the same views after the London riots of 2011? Arguably, years of dismissing the very social problems depicted in Kidulthood led to many of the outrages that summer. Which obviously raises anew the questions about the underlying causes of the problems it identifies.

In The Wire, I think the problems are probably three, all interlinked: the historic ghettoization of poor, largely black communities in some urban centres, the emergence of a parallel economy based on drugs, where child labour is used unashamedly, and the easy availability of firearms. At least in terms of the scale, there is nothing comparable to this is Britain. I think what we have in this country is (1) the enculturation of some young people with a "gangster" ethic which in the USA is often a real expression of a concrete situation, but in Britain is more frequently imitative (hence not belonging necessarily to "urban" youth), (2) a schooling system that embitters some young people rather than facilitating them, and (3) poor parenting. All of these are writ large in Kidulthood, and that's why it's as relevant today in 2013 as it was in 2006.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 3 October 2011
I can understand why some in various online reviews that I have seen scattered across websites have dismissed the movie as 'lacking' and 'chavvy', and I once thought the same... But that was several years ago before I opened my eyes to the world a little more.

The movie is a portrayal of a mix of characters from West London, and follows inner city life of gang culture were the gap between the rich and poor is considerably high. It examines a minority (but growing) of a youth scene and puts us in their shoes as it portrays a day in their lives, boredom which is filled with alcohol, drugs, and violence with the only motivation to survive for the next day. The movie does not beat around the bush with its portrayal and condenses many possible troubles the youth now faces in a single day, including gang violence, drug and alcohol abuse, teenage pregnancy, suicide, bullying, murder, prostitution, and much more. It is quite easy to dismiss those within this culture as the 'dregs of society', but instead this movie forces me to re-examine my position on that, and makes me look for the various and numerous socio-economic reasons as to why this snapshot of British youth is the way it is.

Even the rather obvious portmanteau of 'Kid' and 'Adulthood' should portray what this movie is about rather clearly -- Kids, just kids, who are thrust into something no kid should ever have to deal with, who are forced to grow up faster than they should.

With the growing rates in gang crime and some of the worst gang violence in British history, teenage birth rates in Europe, and growing suicide rates, this movie is just the sucker punch of reality that is needed.

I needn't review the plot as the plot can be read better than I could put into detail here on sites such as Wikipedia, but instead I think I will leave it as my opinion on the message it wishes to evoke.

It is a brave movie to have made, and for me at least, works 100%.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 15 June 2008
Kidulthood explores the lives of teenagers in London in Huda's interesting and controversial 2006 British drama.

The British media runs riot on any story they can get their hands on and exploit, and in recent years have developed various forms of stereotypes, none more so than the stereotypical "gangster teenager" who swears every other sentence, drinks, does drugs and has a violent motive towards others and this ideology is explored by Doctor Who star Noel Clarke.

Clarke dives deep into the lives of numerous teenagers to bring out the personalities of the teenagers, and his character Sam is a stereotype of a teenager, the use of violence and swearing portray the villain of the narrative. I'm usually against stereotypes being used in films but in this case it is interesting to see how these stereotypes feel about being branded that way, when the teenagers walk into a shop and are accused of a crime they didn't commit just because of their image as this stereotype the media has created.

The stories centre around what is regarded as typical teenage lives, which involve Jamie Winstone's character messing around with older men for drugs, a guy and a girl in a complicated relationship where the girl is pregnant and the idea of suicide is also encoded which is very dramatic.

The acting, direction, dialogue and settings are all extremely poor and given the strong message it could have been done so much better.

Regardless the message is there and I couldn't tear myself away even if I wanted to.

The stereotypical view does go over the top, I am 19 and have never seen anyone act as violent or swear as much as the characters in this film. I can see the point, but trying to convey realism was overdone.

The stories of each character are interesting, if somewhat of a cliché. Considering everything about this film is poor, it is a surprising entertaining watch.

6/10
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 18 February 2012
I felt this was more like a fly-on-the-wall documentary that a film with interest and depth. Various elements could have been developed even in the short time span that the film covered - in particular the reaction of the parents to the girl's suicide.

But, they weren't so we are faced with narrative.

That's fine, but how believable was it?

Some bits undoubtedly were - but others screamed out as being 'Yeah, right' type moments. Would the pregnant girl really give out sexual favours for drugs AND (at times) to be a morally upstanding person feeling guilty that she didn't intervene over bullying? Would Trev really react so against his ex when he found she was pregnant and then, only hours later, promise undying love?

I think not.

That said, the general tone of the film was depressing realism. We should send copies to Cameron to be filed along with the files on the September riots. Causes? Cures?

Of all the characters I found Clarke the least believable. he just doesn't look like a thug. Soft skin, podgy face - no, much better as the shop manager in 4-3-2-1.

I do know people who behave like the kids in this film - and these real people are in their 20s. They walk, talk and behave just like older versions - in particular in the way they treat women and the language they use.

It's depressing.

Skins caused a fuss when it first appeared on TV - wait until this film gets a showing!
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