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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have album
This is the album where Dimmu Borgir changed their spots as such. Their previous material For all Tid, Stormblast and the Devils Path EP all had a particular sound to them, mainly lots of atmosphere and a less than top notch production. Everything changed on this one though, the guitars are pushed higher into the mix and the production is crisp and clear, the keyboards...
Published on 10 May 2007 by A. STEPHENS

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2.0 out of 5 stars Really subpar...
Instead of the silky release and starry passion of Stormblaast, or the dramatic flourishes, epic chugging, and viking-themed lyrics of For All Tid, Dimmu Borgir abandon all pretences of originality and thought in favour of filling up a traditional pop-metal band with cheesy heavy metal riffs and boring keyboard passages, which are now relegated to the background, and...
Published 3 months ago by Sen7


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have album, 10 May 2007
This is the album where Dimmu Borgir changed their spots as such. Their previous material For all Tid, Stormblast and the Devils Path EP all had a particular sound to them, mainly lots of atmosphere and a less than top notch production. Everything changed on this one though, the guitars are pushed higher into the mix and the production is crisp and clear, the keyboards remain throughout though as with most Dimmu albums. The old Dimmu sound was left behind forever after this and it helps this album no end. There is some great song writing here and some very memorable tracks. It is not the best Dimmu album but it is a must have !
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Borgirs most consistently engaging album, 16 Aug 2011
By 
Varian Beauregard (Le Jardin d'Angleterre) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Enthrone Darkness Triumphant: Reloaded (Audio CD)
I can't believe so few people have reviewed this album. I think that with time the greatness of this album has been forgotten somewhat. Yet back in 1997 (great times for the evolution of black metal) this was a must-have of the genre along with Emperor's 'Anthems to the Welkin at Dusk' of the same year. It is especially important for this album (though true of most great music) that you need to buy the CD to properly appreciate the music, as digital files leave it sounding flat where it has great depth. The balance here is perfect between the heaviness and keyboards. The vocals are clear (but not clean), and of course in English for the first time. There are so many amazing songs it s impossible to single out just a few for praise. This album really work as a whole, being consistent & excellent with only one notable exception: the Iron Maiden style solo on 'Master Of Disharmony' which jars every time it comes on as if I temporarily changed disc. They still aren't printing the lyrics to the fantastic 'Tormentor of Christian souls' but you don't need them as the vocals are clearer than ever. An album to buy and treasure for any fan of dark music.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Really subpar..., 8 Jun 2014
This review is from: Enthrone Darkness Triumphant: Reloaded (Audio CD)
Instead of the silky release and starry passion of Stormblaast, or the dramatic flourishes, epic chugging, and viking-themed lyrics of For All Tid, Dimmu Borgir abandon all pretences of originality and thought in favour of filling up a traditional pop-metal band with cheesy heavy metal riffs and boring keyboard passages, which are now relegated to the background, and pointless blast-fests that add NOTHING to the music and only succeed in creating an unlistenable dichotomy that makes no sense but sounds "cool." Whereas speed works in bands like Marduk, Dark Funeral, and Mayhem, where they use mind blowingly fast, pulsating drums to create an asthaetic of doom, Dimmu Borgir use them to make the music sound "evil" and "hardcore", and only succeed in creating pointless passages that don't advance the music and stall the inevitable crash into the cliche' flourishes that have nothing to do with these speed-fests.

The first 3 songs are successful in blending the dichotomy of speed vs. melody by incorporating melody and actually linking the speedfests and limiting them to the crux of emotion. However, the delaying of the epitome of the songs is filled with heavy metal derivations of the main melody, sort of working its way into a parody of itself, like at the beginning of Spellbound. After that, the songs have clever sounding intros, but with absolutely nothing worthwhile in the middle. The songs become merely poorly written speed metal with black metal vocals. The overlaying pattern appears to be [blast blast blast blast double bass double bass][cliché' melody][blast blast blast...] etc... until the song ends with a clever sounding riff that has nothing to do with the rest of their songs. In an attempt to rob COF of their flaws, they introduce female vocals in the Night Masquerade, which don't fit in the song at all. Instead of trying to create an ambient sound scape that surrounds the listener with music and emotion, they try to get every single thing that they consider "evil" to sound evil enough to get the all important "mallcore" crowd. Instead of using the female vocals in the slow, tender portions (not even the slow, masculine portions) to enhance the music, they used them to sound "vampyric", or something like that, to shock somebody, and inevitably failed at shocking anybody.

The album picks itself up after falling into brambles with a slow interlude, Entrance. While this song is not in any way perfect, it is at least memorable and uses the keyboards in a way they should be used: To push the melody and act as a counterpoint to the guitars, instead of acting as a 3rd guitarist. However, this is a fleeting moment, as Dimmu Borgir's temptation to make poser/wannabe music overcomes them, and they turn the song into a cheese-fest, with failed attempts at being evil. The band tries to be evil without any knowledge of what evil is, and, as a result, sounds off base in this song, as it shows. However, this song is memorable as it follows through with the melody, instead of succumbing to the laziness and giving up on the melodies in favour of pointless speed fests. However, the disease of this CD comes back in full with more of cliché' speed fests. However, at least now they're in the name of melody, and remain more melodic, and at least make some attempt to make good song writing.

The last two songs (notwithstanding the remake, which was pointless, and an obvious source of "inspiration" for many of the riffs in this album) were better, and were cohesively built, and the ending, A Succubus in Rapture, succeeded in creating a genuinely evil AND epic ending, as all album closers should. However, the goodness of Prudence's Fall and the greatness of A Succubus in Rapture couldn't save this album, and since the first 3 songs had potential, but were half formed, this album suffered a lack of merit. However, of course it was going to succeed, since most people buy into what the band is pandered as, and what they think is evil, instead of what it actually means, because a passer-by cares naught what something means.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Other worldly, 14 Oct 2013
By 
Ben Cormack (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Enthrone Darkness Triumphant: Reloaded (Audio CD)
This is one of those albums that is does not appear to have been created by mere mortals - that is to say the character of the music is so perfectly conceived and executed that you can completely forget that it was a bunch of blokes in a studio making a racket with mere earthly instruments. Other Dimmu Borgir albums are as good, but are definitely produced by a band of humans. It's hard to put your finger on what exactly makes it so special, but "Enthrone Darkness Triumphant" is an album that crept out of a dark Norwegian forest all on its own, both beautiful and macabre, and will fill your ears with a soundtrack to another world.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sons of Satan, 12 April 2010
This review is from: Enthrone Darkness Triumphant: Reloaded (Audio CD)
One of the best albums in genre! The sons of Satan from Norway gathered to create unique music. It's a must for every fan of the extreme styles.
Recorded in The Abyss studio, mixed and engineered by Peter Tägtgren.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Of The Best Dimmu Borgir Albums!!!!, 5 Oct 2003
By 
Andrew Hoy (Blackpool, Lancs United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This is one of my fave dimmu borgir albums. you have great songs on here, and i recommend this album to anybody who is interested in black metal music. Dimmu Borgir are one of the best black metal bands around just like Immortal (id recommend them to!).
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Enthrone Darkness Triumphant: Reloaded by Dimmu Borgir (Audio CD - 2008)
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