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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars BLU-RAY DOUBLE PACK
As most of the reviews posted here are generic, I thought I'd compose one that is blu-ray specific. Like me, most of you will doubtless be aware of the content of these two films and remember them with much fondness. On viewing them again I was surprised at how much of the script I could actually remember despite the two decades or so since I last viewed them on VHS...
Published 22 months ago by J. Blakemore

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars should have gone for blu-ray
The movies are off course brilliant, but the lack of subtitles and a sub-par picture quality doesnt do the movies the credit they deserve.
Published 18 months ago by Dagenes skum


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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars BLU-RAY DOUBLE PACK, 5 Nov 2012
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As most of the reviews posted here are generic, I thought I'd compose one that is blu-ray specific. Like me, most of you will doubtless be aware of the content of these two films and remember them with much fondness. On viewing them again I was surprised at how much of the script I could actually remember despite the two decades or so since I last viewed them on VHS video, a sign perhaps of a misspent youth watching too much television.
But enough of trips down memory lane, what do the blu-rays have to offer? These are not the first 'classic' films that I have purchased on the new format, and having been impressed with the likes of Zulu and A Bridge Too Far, I was slightly disappointed as the opening credits of The Three Musketeers scrolled across the screen, superimposed over the fast moving sword-play between D'Artagnan and his father. The picture appeared blurred and suffered from excessive grain and promised little improvement over and above DVD quality. However I am pleased to report that once the titles had receded, the picture quality vastly improved. As one might expect from a brace of films that were originally filmed in 1973 and 1974 respectively, the picture remains a little grainy, especially in duller scenes such as poorly lit building interiors, where blacks appear somewhat muted and lacking in detail. Faces and clothing too appear slightly softened in such scenes and lacking in the kind of detail one has come to expect on this format. That said, in the brighter scenes the quality of the picture is quite astonishing considering the age of the original material. The extent of Optimum Classic and Studio Canals' digital restoration shines through particularly in the magnificent costumes and back-ground detail. One can see in amazing clarity, for example, the detail in the paintings hanging on the wall of the Duke of Buckinghams' gaming room, as D'Artagnan confronts the Duke with a message from the Queen of France, the paintings becoming exquisite vignettes within the main picture. I noticed no signs of blemishes or scratches and no colour-banding; the colour pallet appearing soft and warm on the interior shots and strikingly bright during exterior scenes, though the green/brown hues of the Spanish country-side remain somewhat pale. I would say that The Four Musketeers is slightly more grainy than the first film, but here too detail is pleasing and sometimes very revealing, just look at the castle in the background of the siege of La Rochelle, so obviously a matte painting. None of these minor issues, however, detract from the joy of watching such fabulous films once again. The picture quality is sufficiently good as to be pleasing and does add a fresh-face to these old comedy-actioners that far surpasses the more recent 2011 film, The Three Musketeers, in both originality and vision. A recommended purchase for lovers of the original films and for all those who love quality costume dramas that don't take themselves too seriously.
If you enjoyed this review then please read my other Blu-ray reviews, and if you find them useful, please leave feedback.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Without doubt, the best Musketeers films ever!, 31 Dec 2009
This review is from: Musketeers: Two For One Pack [DVD] (DVD)
Truly, these two films are masterpieces, in turn witty, romantic, tragic and romping. The acting is superb, the pacing is superb and the scripting is superb. Then there is the humour going on around the main characters (such as the beggars continuing to ask for change when all hope is lost) and what can be said about the fight scenes that would do them justice? Rather than being Hollywoody they come across as being realistic: why waste energy sparing with rapiers when you can just kick the other fellow in the unmentionables? Having said that, the sword fighting looks like the characters actually want to damage each other, rather than just looking rehearsed. I remember falling in love with this film (and Faye Dunaway) when I was about seven years old and the film is still one of my favourites thirty years on. Buy it!
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50 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric attempt at a much overdone story, 30 Jan 2009
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Musketeers: Two For One Pack [DVD] (DVD)
The Three Musketeers has been done to death over the years, with some very good and very bad films resulting. The two films presented here are, in my humble opinion, the best. If you're after some flashy hollywood production however, don't look here, go to the (truly terrible) 1996 effort starring Keifer Sutherland.

These films are relativley slow paced, filled with great performances from a variety of famous actors (Charlton Heston, Oliver Reed, Roy Kinnear and Spike Milligan to name but a very few - you really couldn't get a more varied bunch!) The slow pace allows for a good development of many minor characters and for the director's attention to detail to really draw you into the world of 17th century France.

The films include many elements, high drama, moral dilemmas and several lashings of humour. Oh, and plently of realism. None of your highly coreographed fight scenes that look more like dancing here, when brawls and sword fights come along they look very VERY realistic, and totally different to the usual hollywood attempt at such things.

In all, a very atmospheric and entertaining few hours, which will have you totally caught up in it. And for the price being asked here it's more than well worth it!

The only thing required now is the DVD release of the third film in the trilogy. This was filmed many years after these (which were originally made as one film but released as two shorter films by the distributor) and marked the last performance of Roy Kinnear.
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All for one, and one for all (in a set), 22 Mar 2005
By 
Darren Harrison "DVD collector and reviewer" (Washington D.C.) - See all my reviews
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Anchor Bay deserves a great deal of credit for this informative and entertaining double feature of the two classic Musketeer films from the early 1970s.
Originally planned as one long epic movie (including a then standard intermission in the middle) the decision was made at some point during the production of THE THREE MUSKETEERS that they would either have one four hour movie or two separate movies. Rather than cut out some of the fantastic scenes that had been shot to make the movie more manageable the production company made the more sensible decision to cut the production in two releasing THE THREE MUSKETEER' one year and then THE FOUR MUSKETEERS shortly after.
Not everyone involved in the production of the movie was happy about the decision. Actress Faye Dunaway publicly stated that (had she known about the splitting of the movie into two) she would have refused to do it since her role in the first was so small. The move led to some litigation and was eventually settled but today movie contracts include what is termed "The Salkind Clause" (named after the Salkind's who produced the MUSKETEER movies) to protect actors from such moves.
It is perhaps for this reason that Faye Dunaway is one of the only still living members of the main cast who does not appear on camera for the excellent hour-long documentary THE SAGA OF THE MUSLETEERS that Anchor Bay has put together for this release.
Perhaps a deliberate reflection of the movie (or perhaps simply due to limited space on the DVDs) the documentary is split into two half-hour parts on each disc. Recounting their memories of the production are actors Charlton Heston, Raquel Welch, Michael York, Frank Finlay and Christopher Lee who cover nearly every aspect of the production from their casting to some of the close calls and injuries the actors sustained performing their own stunts and swordflighting with real, very lethal swords.
Lee, himself an expert swordsman, had to remind a rather over enthusiatic Oliver Reed (who abandoned the staged moves for a fight for some more improvised swings) that it was "only a movie."
Also on camera for interviews are producers Ilya Salkind and Pierre Spengler (who would both go on to produce SUPERMAN) who discuss not only the actual production of the movies but also where the initial idea came from and the recruiting of Director Richard Lester. Salkind recounts how Lester initially turned down the invitation to direct the movie, referring to it as "a children's book" (as it was seen at the time). It was not until Salkind actually sent him a copy of the actual Alexandre Dumas novel that Lester became excited by the prospect of directing the adaptation.
With a screenplay by George MacDonald Fraser (of the FLASHMAN novels and later of 1983's OCTOPUSSY) these two movies work remarkably well. Even though there are some surprising stylistic differences (surprising since it was originally meant as one movie). The first movie is definitely more comic in tone and the second darker and more dramatic. This is not to say the second movie is lacking in humor - just witness the Musketeers eating lunch as the prefer for battle with the Protestants.
Of the two I actually prefer the second movie much more because I feel the characters are more drawn out and the intrigue more involving, The climatic sword fight and Oliver Reed-Faye Dunaway subplot are both highlights in my opinion. The second movie also features the shocking deaths of two of the more likeable major characters.
Overall, a fantastic job by Anchor Bay. One can only hope that the third movie in the series, 1989's THE RETURN OF THE MUSKETEERS which was also directed by Richard Lester and included the majority of the original cast, will one day be released on DVD.
Well recommended.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just great fun, 27 Mar 2009
By 
"Mastersinger" (Scarborough, Qld, Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Musketeers: Two For One Pack [DVD] (DVD)
This movie holds its years well and is still the best screen version of the Dumas classic and stays close to the original story. It is said that enough material was left on the cutting room floor to create the Four Musketeers and the sequel maintains the standard created by the Three Musketeers. The movies look good and it is obvious that the actors enjoyed what they were doing; Michael York a naive perplexed D'Artagnan, Richard Chamberlain suave, almost English, Frank Finlay a buffoon and Oliver Reed menacing, Racquel Welch the best endowed seamstress ever! All in all: just great fun.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars subtiles, 25 Sep 2012
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R. Blomme "René" (Rotterdam, Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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Hi, was unable to trace any subtiles details so took a chance and got the box.

Would like to add both disks you can choose

australia/danmark/deutschland/espana/nederland/norge/suomi/sverige/uk/korea(??)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All for one and two for all, 17 May 2010
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Musketeers: Two For One Pack [DVD] (DVD)
Everybody knows (at least vaguely) about "The Three Musketeers" -- evil cardinals, diamonds, and a gang of rather riotous guys whose motto is "All for one and one for all." Fortunately the two-part story of "The Three Musketeers" and "The Four Musketeers" has plenty of charm even if you've read Alexandre Dumas' original novel -- they sparkle with humor, romance, swordplay and political plotting.

Farm lad D'Artagnan (Michael York) arrives in Paris to try to become one of the king's elite Musketeers. After being challenged to three duels within five minutes, D'Artagnan ends up befriending three of the Musketeers: wry alcoholic Athos (Oliver Reed), naughty priest Aramis (Richard Chamberlain), and lovable fop Porthos (Frank Finlay). Even though D'Artagnan isn't a Musketeer yet, the three Musketeers take a liking to him -- as does his landlord's sexy wife, the queen's lady-in-waiting Constance (Raquel Welch).

However, the evil Cardinal Richelieu (Charlton Heston) is seeking to overthrow the queen, who is having an affair with the Duke of Buckingham. So he arranges for her infidelity to be exposed by a pair of ruthless assassins, Milady de Winter and Comte de Rocheforte (Faye Dunaway and Christopher Lee). But Constance gets D'Artagnan to go to England to retrieve the gems the queen gave the Duke, along with the help of the three Musketeers.

"The Four Musketeers" is the second half of the original novel, and appropriately called "Milady's Revenge." Milady is, unsurprisingly, very peeved that the Musketeers thwarted her in the previous film. So she gets a special pardon "in advance" from the Cardinal -- she wants to murder D'Artagnan and Constance, and be unscathed by any punishment.

D'Artagnan sends Constance to a convent, hoping that that will keep her safe. Then, idiotically, he starts an affair with Milady, only to discover the harlot's brand on her shoulder. Milady's machinations spread over the English channel to engulf the Duke of Buckingham. Now only the four Musketeers can hope to bring Milady to justice -- but not before a terrible price is paid.

The art of the action-comedy is pretty much lost -- making action funny. And "The Complete Musketeers" is a prime example of that. One good example is the fight with the Cardinal's guards, where Aramis gleefully dodges sword thrusts, and Porthos attacks with rocks and sticks. Another is the scene where the Musketeers use a fake fight to shoplift food.

But the film never quite descends to slapstick, and there is plenty of drama and even tragedy, as one of the important characters dies, and others reveal not-so-pleasant secrets. The sets are outstanding, lavish and full of detail. And the scripting is equally solid, getting across plenty of information in a series of solid one-liners.

All four of the Musketeers are outstanding: York has that naive Luke Skywalker vibe, while Finlay is a lovable hothead, Chamberlin a charming rogue priest, and Reed a tormented soul. Raquel Welch gets to play a fun, comedic character as the clumsy Constance (who, as soon as we see her, falls down the stairs). Heston seems to be relishing the role of a bad guy, and Christopher Lee exudes icy menace as the Comte. Faye Dunaway is also excellent, though she doesn't get to shine until "Four Musketeers."

The spirit of Alexandre Dumas seems to live on in the solid, entertaining, tragic, action-filled "Three Musketeers" and "Four Musketeers" It's a period piece with a wink and nudge.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic, 5 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Musketeers: Two For One Pack [DVD] (DVD)
what more can i say!! true classic great!! used to love these films when i was younger and love them even more now!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Real Gem, 29 Sep 2013
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One of the must have films. I enjoyed the movie from the start to the finish. The cast assembled in this production was outstanding. Marvelous!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars should have gone for blu-ray, 9 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Musketeers: Two For One Pack [DVD] (DVD)
The movies are off course brilliant, but the lack of subtitles and a sub-par picture quality doesnt do the movies the credit they deserve.
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Musketeers: Two For One Pack [DVD]
Musketeers: Two For One Pack [DVD] by Richard Lester (DVD - 2008)
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