Customer Reviews


46 Reviews
5 star:
 (36)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My absolute favourite Moody Blues album..........i think.
From the release of their debut album "Days Of Future Passed" in 1967 till 1972,s "Seventh Sojourn " The Moody Blues produced seven excellent albums. Arguably the best of the lot (Some days i myself would plump for "Our Childrens Childrens Children") is "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour" their sixth. It was the first Moody Blues album i became intimately familiar with...
Published on 25 Jan 2008 by russell clarke

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars great album, but SACD mix could've been better
The music is great, the SACD multichannel had an overloaded mix of the bass. I was hoping for a better mix, closer to the excellent original vinyl sound.
Published 8 months ago by Karl L.


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My absolute favourite Moody Blues album..........i think., 25 Jan 2008
By 
russell clarke "stipesdoppleganger" (halifax, west yorks) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
From the release of their debut album "Days Of Future Passed" in 1967 till 1972,s "Seventh Sojourn " The Moody Blues produced seven excellent albums. Arguably the best of the lot (Some days i myself would plump for "Our Childrens Childrens Children") is "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour" their sixth. It was the first Moody Blues album i became intimately familiar with after filching it my fathers collection and every time i hear the incremental intro to "Procession" i want to hear the complete album with no interruptions thank you very much.
As with most Moodies albums the song writing , playing and production (Courtesy of the ever present Tony Clarke) are top notch. The largely instrumental "Procession" is piece of music designed to describe the history of music from the beginning of time till the present day and is also the first song written by the entire band. It segues brilliantly with the lightning bolt electricity of "The Story In Your Eyes" , one of the bands greatest songs and for a Justin Hayward penned track a surprisingly up-tempo experience. Ray Thomas also provides one if his strongest songs with "Our Guessing Game", a track that highlights the bands outstanding intricate vocal and harmony work.
Again we see a change of perception with John Lodge who usually wrote the bands more rock orientated songs contributing "Emily,s Song"- written for his newly born daughter and its a lovely tippling ballad hat crucially avoids mawkishness. "After You Came" written by Graham Edge returns to the albums central dramatic precept.Built around a stop/start arrangement that feels slightly rushed and once again is shot through with scorching blasts of Hayward's guitar. "One More Time To Live" is the sort of monumental ballad that Justin Hayward would ordinarily write but Lodge again out of character writes. It,s an audacious song and under appreciated for it,s use of an extended middle eight and multi layered vocal work. Without doubt the most ambitious song on the album it,s lyrics culminating in "Salvation, communication, compassion" resonates through the years.What follows rather bizarrely in the context of the music is Ray Thomas,s "Nice To Be Here" which is a lilting hugely melodic ditty about animals playing instruments and consequently comes across as a more sophisticated "Frogs Chorus". Now its , normally the sort of thing i would rather bash my head with breeze blocks than listen to this sort of tweeness but this is oddly charming and beguiling song and is lyrically quite clever.....and you will be whistling it for days
The tone turns more portentous and darker with Hayward's brooding ballad "You Can Never Go Home", a song which again showcases again his , in my opinion, hugely under rated vocal prowess. Mike Pinder writes the not surprisingly mellotron heavy "My Song"( Incidentally "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour" was the last Moodies album to feature the mellotron- they used the Chamberlin- a similar instrument on the next album) a swirling eddying exhortation for universal love and acceptance .
A great band -How many bands can you think of where every member writes the songs and sings as well as The Moody Blues do?......The Beatles?....Oasis ?(joke). That were never better than they were with "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour" and they were pretty damm good up till then. I,its a mature album exploring metaphysical themes that still retains a glistening commercial sheen but without becoming compromised by it. It,s diverse thematically and musically too and is just a joy to listen to from beginning to end. If you have,nt already do yourself a favour and give it a listen.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just Fantastic, 19 July 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (Audio CD)
I have owned this album in Vinyl since 1973, and IMHO is the best of the original 7 Moodies Albums recorded with Justin Hayward and John Lodge. The segue from "Procession" to "Story in Your Eyes" sends a tingle up my spine every time I hear it and the fade out to "My Song" is just superb; little wonder some odd folks thought of the Moodies as of another world. But the best track has to be "You Can Never Go Home", just brilliant; I can't understand why this track has never appeared on a Moodies compilation.
This remaster is excellent, increasing clarity but losing none of the warmth of Tony Clarke's original production.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best from the Best?, 8 July 2007
By 
M. Jones (Hereford UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is probably the best offering from the best band in the world. Each and every track is a classic, with the Story In Your Eyes the best single that never was. I have aspired to a hi fi that would do justice to this track and deliver the guitar work as it was meant to be heard. I think I'm there now. Why on earth didn't they release this as a single in the UK? This album is the band at their peak with other tracks of merit including After You Came and the wonderful One More Time To Live. Wall to wall quality with no duff offerings here. Perhaps the best introduction to the band for those taking the plunge for the first time. Highly recommended to all considering a Moodies album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EGBDF is simply magnificent!, 21 July 2009
By 
Nigel B. Howarth "Nige" (Camberley, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Fell in love with the Moody Blues at the age of 15 when my elder brother bought 'To our Childrens, Childrens, Children' and 'Watching and Waiting' is my favourite piece of music, bar none! But when it comes to my favourite album of all time it has to be 'Every Good Boy Deserves Favour'. It encapsulates everything that the Moodies are about. Fantastic songs, great musicianship, marvelous production and simply an album with a band at it's peak. Although you couldn't describe this as a concept album I love the way that tracks blend into one another and every track is pure gold.

'The Story in Your Eyes' is the best track never released in the UK, 'One More Time to Live' is a classic example of harmonies with multiple lyrics which others copied in the years since. The middle section in 'You Can Never Go Home' starting with 'all my life, I never really knew me till today' is soooo good and My Song' is pure Mike Pinder (God I missed him when he left to breed tropical birds in LA!). But just the start of the album with 'Procession' kinda sucks you in and immerses you into the start of a wonderful musical journey.

"I know you won't believe me but I'm certain that I did see a mouse playing daffodil" - you don't get lyrics like that anymore!!

Thanks to the Moody Blues for some truly awesome music, and for those who still wonder what all the fuss is about, listen to those first 7 albums, listen to fantastic songs and ponder why this magnificent group have never been honoured by the British music industry, which is a disgrace.

To all of the 'silent majority' out there, then as the band would say, 'thank you for keeping the faith'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a high point of their career, 8 Jan 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (Audio CD)
For me, this is where it all clicks, the Moody Blues hit the right mix of tunes, lyrics and inventiveness.
Every song oozes confidence in their own ability, while still retaining the risk-taking and imagination that has long since gone from their work.
Great album from the first to the last track, the bonus stuff is even a welcome addition instead of the usual "filler".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Greatest from an amazing band, 1 Nov 2012
This review is from: Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (Audio CD)
A misty-mooned sleeve, against which a sage from the ages shows a child the miracles that he will inherit. A fair metaphor for the wonders in this album. To a certain extent, it is a shame that the band didn't finish with this crescendo of an album, as it is as damn near perfect as makes no odds. The band never gelled as completely as they did on this album, and each track has the same wonderfully wistful optimism and regret running peacefully through it. Each member has their own little masterpiece on this album. The album starts with what sounds like a descending UFO and then a quick run-through the evolution of music from primitive drums to... er, primitive drums'n'guitars! This then erupts into Hayward's magnificent "Story in Your Eyes" with some great buzz-saw guitar. Following on is Thomas' wonderfully sweeping "Our Guessing Game", then Lodge's nursery-tale "Emily's Song" (which I'm pretty sure begat Yes' "Wonderous Stories" in time!). Next up is Edge's "After You Came" with some splendidly Thumper-esque clodhopping drums! What used to be Side Two (how old am I?) sweeps onward to the wonderful binary that is Hayward's "You Can Never Go Home Anymore" (which, incidentally, always reminds me so much of leaving my little village by the seaside for the Big City) and then... ah, the song that will forever knock Lennon's ghastly "Imagine" into a cocked hat: Mike Pinders COSMIC "My Song". Never has a song so encapsulated the Moody's soul and so torn at my heart-strings. Pinder's voice tears at the soul and the Mellotron weeps before an instrumental break that sounds like a sonic version of the climax of "2001", a Star Child hovering silently above our planet gazing down at us. The keyboards sweep back in with the band's crying vocals and eruptive piano. The song then softens down for Pinder's final benediction and the band board the UFO of the opening, and disappear off into the universe, leaving us blinking back tears. Yes, it is THAT good!!! Of course, the band went on the record "Seventh Sojourn", the final of the iconic "Core Seven", but they never EVER got as good as this. I only hope that the royalties have kept Mike Pinder comfortable ever since. You write one song like that in your life... if you're lucky!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And it is Deserved, 19 Nov 2008
By 
Mr. Peter Steward "petersteward" (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (Audio CD)
The swirling melodies return as the band seem to ramp things up again after the relative sparseness of the previous album. There are some corkers here with the band proving vocally very strong indeed.

There is a pastoral feel to Emily's Song - a lovely piece. Elsewhere it s whimsical trip of swirling mellotron and guitars - almost the quintessential Moody Blues sound and in many ways this was probably more representative of the whole raft of band styles than practically any other album. Plenty of classical overtones as well with a fine ending in the form of "My Song" - this was certainly one of their strongest albums.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars High on the scale, 7 Aug 2010
By 
D. J. H. Thorn "davethorn13" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (Audio CD)
Desoite their sometime 'prog' reputation, The Moody Blues were mainly about three minute songs. On 'EGBDF' they began to stretch the tracks out a bit further than before, but remained a song-based band. Their tendency to play tricks at the start of their albums resurfaces here. 'Procession', which appears to be a short history of evolution, is as much a work of modern art as a piece of music. Although elements of it are reprised on John Lodge's superb 'One More Time To Live', the rest of the album is straightforward Moody Blues, albeit in the usual diversity of musical styles.

Justin Hayward, their most consistent writer, delivers once again, particularly with the fast 'The Story In Your Eyes'. Ray Thomas also excels with the dignified 'Our Guessing Game'. His 'Nice To Be Here' is a little lightweight for me, as is Lodge's 'Emily's Song', though the latter appears to be popular with most fans. Graeme Edge, for once not limited to his poetry, offers one of his best efforts in 'After You Came'. Mike Pinder's six-minute 'My Song' provides a very satisfying conclusion. As ever, a beautifully-crafted album, though I can't quite give it full marks.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Moodies album, 5 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (Audio CD)
I regard this album, which I discovered in the early 70s, as an absolute masterpiece. It was a definite milestone, in fact turning point, on my own musical journey from late 60s soul/Motown to all that lay beyond. Although all of the Moodies' famous, late 60s/early 70s, "pre-Moraz", first seven albums (featuring Mike Pinder at his mellotronic best) show the band combining together, assisted by Tony Clarke's prodigious production skills, to create a unique sound and amazing music,(and I would recommend anyone to include them all in their music collection), this is for me the album that represents their coming of age and very best work. It is creative, progressive, mature and seriously good. Not a single weak track, lots of variety, and all segueing from one to the next, naturally and seamlessly. Because it is more profound and less instantly commercial than some of their other work, it is one of those that seeps into your brain after a few listens, and eventually, you may find, like me, that it holds a special place in your affections. A real "grower". I can say without hesitation that it would be the one album from the Moodies' entire catalogue that I would have to include in my Desert Island top 10 - and probably ahead of such must-haves as Sgt Pepper, Abbey Road, Dark Side of the Moon, Rumours, OK Computer and Beethoven's 9th. If you like crashing guitars, soaring, symphonic mellotron and unforgettable melodies, this is the one for you. It is the Moodies' album that is most similar to the classic Barclay James Harvest and King Crimson albums of the same era. Listen to it when you have the time to soak up its atmosphere, preferably late at night in a darkened room.
Seventh Sojourn was most certainly a worthy successor, though very different in character. It is good in recent years to see the Moodies now aiming to recapture some of that old mellotronic sound and atmospheric, "tingle-factor" quality in their music (particularly after some of the mistakes of the 1980s). I was particularly amazed, gratified and impressed to hear them on their last tour successfully performing "One More Time to Live" (track 1, second side of EGBDF), which I had always thought to be too difficult to perform well live. Whether their work will ever ascend to the elevated height of EGBDF remains to be seen - it may depend on whether Justin, John and Graeme still have the artistic and creative drive, and the desire to really SERIOUSLY reward their many fans, by teaming up again with Mike Pinder (sadly not Tony Clarke - R.I.P.). Like so many bands of the past, that have been composed of several individual, contrasting but complimentary artistic talents (e.g. Beatles, Floyd, BJH, Mac, Who, Zeppelin) theirs was a very special and magical combination while they were together, each contributing something indefinable. They struck gold and could again - Justin and John's songwriting still cuts the mustard, and I assume that Mike's spirituality (sorely missed in the post "Octave" albums) is still intact. Anyway, I'm waffling - play it six times and you'll be hooked for life (like I was)!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A classic MB album - but something has been lost, 10 Sep 2009
By 
A. J. Sturgess "Alan Sturgess" (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
There is no doubt that EGBDF is a classic album with only track 1 (Procession) taking a while to understand as it is largely a sequence of merged sounds and sound effects.

Like another reviewer, I've been a fan of the MB's ever since their first LP release. They form a large part of our lives as, when my wife and I got engaged nearly 40 years ago, I took her to see them live at the Albert Hall ... that was the tour when Mike Pinder's Mellotron just wouldn't stay in tune!!!

Everyone has their favourite MB album and although this one isn't mine, it is still high in my personal chart with some great songs, especially 'The story in your eyes','One more time to live' and the plaintive 'You can never go home'. But now, of course, through the marvels of Amazon, you can hear the samples and judge for yourself.

So why only '4' stars? It's got something to do with my personal dislike for a lot of recordings which are now being digitally enhanced (they've just done the same for the entire Beatles back catalogue). True, the sound is pure and crystal clear and therein lies my complaint because to my ears a degree of warmth is lost. 'Humanity' if you will. This is fine for music by such electronic artists as Tangerine Dream, but not when the human voice is involved. The original LP's and the first tranche of CD releases had that little touch of muddiness and warmth. EGBDF is the only CD in my MB collection which has the 'remastered' tag and for most people it will be truly excellent, but for me and my idiosyncratic tastes it has lost a little something in the process -- one star's worth, to be exact.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Every Good Boy Deserves Favour
Every Good Boy Deserves Favour by The Moody Blues (Audio CD - 2008)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews