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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great classical/progressive rock concept album
"Days of Future Passed" has one of the stranger stories behind the birth of an album in rock history. In 1967 Deram Records, part of the Decca label, wanted to promote its new Deramic Stereo process and tapped the Moody Blues to do a rock version of Dvorak's "New World Symphony." However, instead of putting together something that would anticipate Emerson, Lake &...
Published on 1 Jan 2003

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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good afternoon
An album made under unusual conditions at a time when The Moody Blues were commercially nowhere, 'Days Of Future Passed' would be more accurately credited equally to band and orchestra. That's where the problem lies: the band's 'Afternoon', 'Evening' and 'Night' segments are superb, but before you get to them you have to listen to what is mostly light orchestral music of...
Published on 22 July 2010 by D. J. H. Thorn


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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great classical/progressive rock concept album, 1 Jan 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
"Days of Future Passed" has one of the stranger stories behind the birth of an album in rock history. In 1967 Deram Records, part of the Decca label, wanted to promote its new Deramic Stereo process and tapped the Moody Blues to do a rock version of Dvorak's "New World Symphony." However, instead of putting together something that would anticipate Emerson, Lake & Palmer's live performance of Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition," the group persuaded the powers that be to abandon the Dvorak idea and let them do their own original compositions. Obviously inspired by the Beatle's "Sgt. Pepper," the result was a concept album presenting an archetypal day from "The Day Begins" to "Nights in White Satin" and essentially became the first major salvo in the Progressive Rock movement. This is another album that benefits from being on CD because as an album or cassette Side 2, with "Tuesday Afternoon" and "Nights in White Satin," was going to be listened to a lot more. Both those songs were written and sung by Justin Hayward, who had just joined the band in the wake of Denny Laine's departure. The fusion of rock and classical music works well overall, mainly because the pretentiousness of the songs was offset by the stunningly beautiful orchestrations by Peter Knight. Arguably the Moody Blues never scaled these grand heights again and in one significant sense they never tried: after "Days of Future Passed" the orchestra was replaced by a Mellotron on their albums. But what would become part of the Moody Blue's music that would continue were the deep thoughts profoundly intoned by Graeme Edge, which certainly gave this album one of the most unusual endings in rock history. I think this album still stands up today; if it does not, then it surely takes me back to a time when it did. So there.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolute classic., 10 Dec 2003
By 
Mr. R. Baker (Leeds, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
Days of Future Passed is my favourite album from the 1960s. A mixture of solid, well written 60s psychedelic pop and lush orchestral arrangements give the album an epic, but not over the top feel.
The album is written and constructed as a concept album, marking a day, from sunrise to sunset. Some of the lyrics reflect this in their lyrics (Peak Hour, The Sun Set), whilst some of the references are far more abstract (Dawn is a Feeling, Nights in White Satin).
The songwriting is of a high standard throughout - there are no songs on the album I don't love - and the overall sound is excellent, with beautiful harmonies and excellent instrumentation.
Standout songs include 'Peak Hour', in a 60s R&B style, the fast paced 'Twlight Time' and, of course, 'Nights in White Satin'.
The album's downpoint, as many will tell you, is the poetry in 'The Day Begins' and in the orchestral outro, which is just irritating more than anything. Otherwise, I think this album is perfect, and could not recommend it enough.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!, 25 Jun 2002
This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
This album is one of my all time favourites - no doubt. The beautiful mix of classical music and electric instruments is superb. When the electric instruments in a song takes over from the classical instruments it's so beautiful done that it's almost hard to be aware of when it happens.
"Tuesday afternoon" and "Nights in white satin" are two classic songs. But the rest of the songs are also very, very good. This was the first Moody blues album I bought and it's still my favourite. I listen to it often is fascinated every time how good it is and how well written the songs are.
I usually don't write this positive about an album as I don't want to be seen as an immature, fanatical fan. But with this album I can't help it. This CD is on my top 5 album of all times!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ON THE CUTTING EDGE..., 24 May 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
A unique and magical meld of pop and classical strains make for an unusually compelling CD. The symphonic orchestration of the Moody Blues' music extends their range, and somehow it all works.
Though some of the CD may now seem pretentious and pedestrian, such as the poetry which is, in fact, somewhat trite and sophomoric, the rest of it is quite sublime. Two tracks in particular make this CD well worth having, "Forever Afternoon (Tuesday?)" and "The Night: Nights in White Satin". These two tracks are quintessential Moody Blues.
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Days of Optimism, Magic and Wonder, 26 Feb 2010
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Greywolf (Wiltshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
1967. The Beatles were working on Sergeant Pepper, the Rolling Stones were getting busted and going psychedelic, Pink Floyd were wowing them down at the UFO, Timothy Leary was advising the world's youth to "turn on, tune in, drop out," art was exploding with extravagant flashes of colour, light shows were swirling, flowers were for wearing, life was for living and to be young was a treasure and an opportunity. Magic was in the air. And in a studio in London, the five members of the Moody Blues gathered to fashion a portion of that magic into an album the like of which the world had never heard. The result was this still remarkable collaboration of rock band and orchestra, featuring a collection of strong songs and musical themes, outstanding among which is, of course, their hit single, 'Nights In White Satin.' The latter is widely recognised as one of the best singles in the history of recorded music. The whole album is one of the finest artefacts of a revolutionary musical era. In the current age of cynicism it's fashionable to dismiss the Moody Blues as limp, lame, hippy has-beens. Personally, I rate them as among the all-time great British rock bands and find their albums still fresh, enjoyable and relevant after all these years. This album stands up remarkably well, taking us through a day from sunrise to night with every note, phrase and lyric perfectly judged to create what is arguably the first themed rock album. The quality of the musicianship from the band members is amazing. This was a band who could genuinely play real instruments. Their voices combine beautifully too. A true classic, still capable of rekindling the magic of a golden era of optimism and wonder.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The First Of The True Moody Blues, 8 Jan 2003
By 
Martin A Hogan "Marty From SF" (San Francisco, CA. (Hercules)) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
This is the hallmark recording that started the Moody Blues on their sojourn and it is a remarkable one at that. This grouping brought in John Lodge and Justin Hayward maximizing the songwriting and vocal harmonizing that is so well known now. Although the symphonic arrangments may sound slightly dated, it is still a 'mood-piece' to wash away your worries and dive into your dreams. "Night In White Satin" was released in 1967 and 1971 as a single, so strong is it's appeal. The other songs display how talented and unafraid these musicians were to experiment, bringing classical pop into the rock arena.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An imaginative gem, 27 May 2007
By 
Paul Rance (Whaplode Drove, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
The first of the great Moody Blues concept albums. Only seven tracks in all, but several are split into two parts or more, and the mostly clever, sometimes irritating, orchestral links mean there's a lot packed into an album of just over 40 minutes.

This is an album structured around a day. The first track is a lush orchestral piece, from The London Festival Orchestra (who are featured throughout), entitled 'THE DAY BEGINS', with snippets of tracks from the album, and an illuminating poem.

Justin Hayward's clear, lilting voice comes bursting through in the lustrous 'DAWN: Dawn Is A Feeling'. 'THE MORNING: Another Morning' is a whimsical song, bolstered by some lively flute and a rhythm which sounds, paradoxically, like a childlike marching song.

'LUNCH BREAK: Peak Hour' rocks, and is significantly heavier than anything previously, with loud bass to the fore.

'THE AFTERNOON: a) Forever Afternoon (Tuesday?)' is a gorgeous track, with Hayward's ethereal vocals and Mike Pinder's Mellotron giving the track an eerie quality, followed by a lively middle, and back again. 'THE AFTERNOON: b) (Evening) Time To Get Away' begins with a stark kind of beauty, and then goes into a happy clappy phase, and then into some impressive falsetto, and rich Mellotron phases.

'EVENING: a) The Sunset' is a fine mix of an Indian-sounding rhythm and orchestral music. 'EVENING: b) Twilight Time' throbs, and hurls us over with its vibrancy.

'THE NIGHT: Nights In White Satin' closes the album. 'Nights In White Satin' needs no introduction as one of the true gems in the history of rock music. Lyrically and musically it's about as flawless as it gets, and if 'Go Now' sealed the group's fame, this song sealed their immortality - at least as long as rock music is listened to anyway. And for those of you who've only heard the single, the album version gives you a thoughtful, reflective poem, and a gong to finish (just like a later classic, 'Bohemian Rhapsody'). Like the album cover art by David Anstey, this album can seem different every time you view it/listen to it. Though, I prefer to draw a veil over where the inspiration for the title 'Nights In White Satin' came from. Not romantic at all!

- Paul Rance/booksmusicfilmstv.com.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ABSOLUTELY MAGNIFICENT, 15 July 2011
By 
HAYLING BOOK & MUSIC VENUE (HBMV) "Hayling Is... (26 Rails Lane Hayling Island) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
I am at a loss to understand why one reviewer gave this a one star rating, but we all have an opinion...and here is mine for what it is worth!

I heard this album in its entirety for the first time recently. It was intriguing, because I had heard the individual single releases and some album tracks on compilations and live albums. It was a joy to now hear them in their proper surroundings, cradled in an orchestral setting as part of a larger piece of work.

The album as a whole is of the highest quality for its time (1967) and the orchestrations and compositions (even the 'links') are inspiring and highly enjoyable.

It is fair to say that the CD release could have done without all the bonus paraphenalia which whilst welcome from a value perspective, is difficult to listen to as a 'tack-on' to such a complete, wonderful and well rounded production.

Outstanding.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sgt Pepper Lite, 14 May 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
Wonderful, timeless example of English sixties psychedelia. Green Grass, Blue Skies, Jazz Cigarettes.... Don't be put off by the over exposure of "Nights..", this is choc-full of eccentric, tuneful grooves. Evocative stuff.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars essential listening..., 28 July 2004
This review is from: Days Of Future Passed (Audio CD)
It's incredible to listen to this album and think that it was originally recorded as an experiment - an opportunity to test out a new style of studio recording and at one stage possibly not even to be released - in much the same way that 'Nights in White Satin' was originally not for single release because of its apparently prohibitive length (let alone being considered capable of becoming a chart hit on two separate occasions), an idea that in this day of occasionally feature-length releases (step forward Bryan Adams, Meat Loaf, Oasis et al) seems positively ridiculous.
'Days of Future Passed', the Moody Blues' first genuine studio album also saw the coming together of their classic line-up, following the first single 'Go Now' and departure of guitarist Denny Laine. It was put together as an archetypal concept album in a similar vein to the Beatles' Sgt Pepper, whilst allowing Decca to test their new 'Dynamic Sound System' recording studio method at the same time. The idea of having a rock band combining with a full orchestra, songs with fully scored interludes and links might have seemed ludicrous and extravagant at the time, but the result certainly only justifies the latter description and illustrates perfectly both the bravery and musical confidence of the band.
If one ignores the overblown and close to disastrous start to the album bestowed by 'The Day Begins', Days of Future Passed flows through and over you like one long magical performance. The contribution of Peter Knight and the London Festival Orchestra sits comfortably alongside and between the more conventional songs of the Moody Blues; indeed, a certain amount of the magic of tracks such as 'Tuesday Afternoon' and 'Nights in White Satin' is lost without the 'classical' contribution. As a recorded work, the album comfortably transcends time - even in these days of extensive digital production - as illustrated by the enduring popularity of its most famous track.
A magnificent work - in some ways, the Moody Blues would never surpass this debut album - and a must for any self-respecting fan of either the band, the decade or the genre.
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