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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best
This is, put simply, the best rock album I have ever heard. Most people discuss the orchestral sweep, the mastery of One for the Vine etc etc; I want to put in a case for Blood on the Rooftops as one of the most surprisingly moving rock songs ever written. The unlikely writing partnership of Phil Collins and Steve Hackett pays off with an unusual and devastating result:...
Published on 3 Mar 2003 by graham4153

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not my cup of tea
This record was the last I bought by Genesis. The band were not the same without Gabriel. The stories in the songs were not as interesting. The melodies did not seem as good. The worst to my ear was that this record and the previous 'Trick of The Tail' seemed to have an excess of jangly treble sounds which were torture to listen to, and I preferred Gabriel's voice.
Published 3 months ago by K. Prygodzicz


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best, 3 Mar 2003
This review is from: Wind And Wuthering (Audio CD)
This is, put simply, the best rock album I have ever heard. Most people discuss the orchestral sweep, the mastery of One for the Vine etc etc; I want to put in a case for Blood on the Rooftops as one of the most surprisingly moving rock songs ever written. The unlikely writing partnership of Phil Collins and Steve Hackett pays off with an unusual and devastating result: this song and this album should be played in schools to teach the youth of today what music is!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure Genesis Genius, 24 Jan 2004
This review is from: Wind And Wuthering (Audio CD)
An absolute masterpiece as Genesis albums go. 11th Earl is a first-class opener, and it just gets better from there. Phil, having taken over as lead vocalist on "A Trick of the Tail", continues to lend his own unique style to some beautiful lyrics. "Blood on the Rooftops" has a poignancy as it was one of Steve Hackett's last contributions to the band before he left. A stunning finale - the last 3 tracks are segue, a winning formula later repeated on "Duke", with that good old trick of reminding the listener of previous tracks. (In that quiet earth has a great riff from 11th Earl). "Afterglow" really rounds it all off with its powerfully romantic sound. Certainly worth every penny!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Last Hurrah...., 22 Oct 2000
This review is from: Wind And Wuthering (Audio CD)
Simply put, IMHO, the last great Genesis album before it all went downhill. They hadn't had a bad album from 'Foxtrot' to 'Trick of the Tail', and Wind and Wuthering is the last of this great era of Genesis albums.
The Album opens with Eleventh Earl of mar, which is really the stand out track for 'theme' of the album, that, and One for the Vine are just amazing. If you like the instrumental sections of genesis work, then wind and wuthering is definetely no exception. Two tracks in one 'Unquiet slumbers for the sleepers.... and ...In that quiet earth' is a suberb 10 or so minute instrumental that eventually crescendos to a very funky rendition of the Eleventh Earl of Mar theme (which i might add, is my favourite few bars of the album, and i can't help but Bounce to). Other Stand out tracks are 'All in a mouse's night' which for some reason reminds me of 'Robbery, assault and Battery' from Trick in it's structure - (and in it's place, at the start of side two), actually overall Wind and Wuthering is a very succesful evolution from Trick of the Tail, developing a new side of Genesis, that unfortunately only lasted these two albums (although i feel they recaptured some of the magic on 'duke'). another great track is 'Your own special way', which i hated at first, because i can't stand ballads, but after the Middle Eight section with the mellotron, When it kicks back in, really got me interested - Now i love it. Overall, A great album, but needs a few listens to get used to.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Close to perfection, 30 Nov 2007
By 
M. Blackwell - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Whenever I hear this album, thoughts go back to the gig in 1977 at Birmingham Odeon, when I saw the boys on the "Wind" tour. The most brilliant concert I have ever been to, showcasing their most brilliant album (more so than Trick of the Tail). This album represents the high-water mark of Genesis's career, before the sad decline through "And Then There Were Three", and "Duke", to the appalling "ABACAB".

Prog-rock is often criticised as just self-indulgent twiddling, but listen to the epic story-telling of "One for the Vine", the lush romanticism of "Your Own Special Way", and the semi-orchestral "Blood on the Rooftops", with its witty lyrics (the Queen, Errol Flynn and Mother Goose mentioned in the same song?) - I'm getting a bit carried away, but you get the picture. If you want the finest example of 1970's British prog-rock, this album is close to perfection. If your acquaintance with Genesis began in 1979, buy this album and hear what you missed.

Incidentally, I know I'm not supposed to comment on other reviews, but I can't let previous comments on "All in a Mouse's Night" go without offering a different view. A weak track? Let's run it through the checklist for Genesis classics: 1. Whimsical/nursery-rhyme lyrics - check. 2.Sublime guitar from Hackett - check. 3. Movements with different time-signatures - check. 4.Climactic, multi-layered ending with Banks playing everything including the kitchen sink - check. Yep, sounds like a classic to me. Definitely one of the best tracks on the album. But hey - don't believe me, buy it and judge for yourself!
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Continued Excellence!, 1 Jun 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Wind And Wuthering (Audio CD)
Wind And Wuthering continues from where A Trick Of The Tail left of - excellence all-round. There are many excellent songs on this album. 'Eleventh Earl Of Mar' is a pulsating opener, filled with booming drums and quietly atmospheric guitar. The wonderful epic track 'One For The Vine' is equally loud, but with wonderful keyboards/guitars. Other personal favourites include 'Blood On The Rooftops' with the well-crafted accoustic opening and eccentric lyrics, and the U.S. Hit 'Your Own Special Way' - a classic ballad (recently re-done by Paul Carrack). It was a shame that this was Hackett's last studio album - although he was on Seconds Out. But the trio continued to greater heights - and this album is another great continuation of the epic Genesis style, as the later albums were too!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hackett so crucial, 29 Jan 2006
By 
N. Mason (Taunton, Somerset United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Wind And Wuthering (Audio CD)
This is an excellent (if not perfect) Genesis album - probably the last true 'progressive album' as from then on the 'poppy' side of Genesis tends to show through more and more. What this album shows more than anything is how crucial Steve Hackett was to the sound the band produced. The lack of cutting edge on future albums when Mike Rutherford is playing lead guitar can be clearly seen and heard if you listen to this album. There are some top class songs - some of them may now seem a touch overlong but that is a minor criticism. 'One for the Vine' is a classic Genesis song with an interesting story line and some superb instrumental passages. 'Blood on the Rooftops' is another classic which Steve Hackett has recently been playing in his live show. There is only one weak song on the album 'Your Own Special Way' which is frankly quite boring. It is also disappointing to note that Steve Hackett left after this album as he felt that his work was not been represented - then why put a bit of a filler in like 'Wot Gorilla'? Have a listen if you get the chance to the song 'Inside and Out' which is available on the Arcoives 2 and wonder why it was not included on this album -it would have made it an even stronger album and probably have kept Hackett in the band.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, Don't be Put off by the Cover, 9 Sep 2002
By A Customer
This CD is definitely one of Genesis' best. The first track Eleventh Earl of Mar is a great ten minute track which in my opinion is one of Genesis' most underrated tracks. 9/10. One for the Vine is another of the great tracks on the album. Quite slow with nice changes of pace. However can get a bit tiresome at times. 8/10. Your Own Special Way is Genesis' first Ballad. This was written by Mike Rutherford and has some great acoustic guitar. 8/10. Wot Gorilla is a great fusion like track which is much like Phil Colins work with Brand X. 8/10. All in a Mouses Night is the track that lets down this album a bit. Great lyrics though. Blood on the Rooftops is definitely one of the highlights of this album. Great classical guitar by Steve Hackett. Very powerful when the drums get started. 10/10. Unquiet Slumber for the Sleepers... again demonstrates Steve Hackett's classical guitar ability. Underrated track again. 8/10. ...In That Quiet Earth is one of Genesis' best ever. A live favourite for years after. Great keyboards by Tony Banks. 10/10. Afterglow is arguably the hightlight of the album. Very powerful track written by Tony Banks. Again 10/10. If you like any of the earlier Genesis stuff I guarantee you'll like this.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Steve's Last Contribution, 8 Oct 2009
By 
Jonathan P. Hughes "JPH01" (Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Wind And Wuthering (MP3 Download)
Ah, 1970s prog rock...
We loved our odd time signatures and our obscure lyrical content - oh, and virtuosity was a given. Mediocre players needn't apply.

So it was with Genesis before it began to fall apart with Peter Gabriel's departure after 'The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway'.

Everyone assumed that Genesis would fold instantly; but Phil Collins, as it turned out, could sing. So, whereas you might not have had the benefit of Peter Gabriel's "characters" within a song, or the opportunity to get all metaphysical whilst trying to talk to your stoned mates about the deeper layers of meaning contained within 'Trick of the Tail', at least we had a passably good album. 'Los Endos' was excellent, actually.

'Wind and Wuthering' was the last album before Steve Hackett's departure. It has its high points ('Blood on the Rooftops')and its low points ('All in a Mouse's Night'). In the case of the former, you have an achingly lovely classical guitar intro, some fantastic chord (& key?) changes that really push you into that 'other place' - the place in your head, where your dreams happen - and a well-characterised, bittersweet lyric. This is what we'd learned to love about Genesis. Lovely. In the case of the latter, you're not far away from trite synth-pop.

'Rooftops' was Steve Hackett's contribution. If Wikipedia is to be believed, he had more to offer to this album, but was faced with opposition from the other members. Subsequently, he left and over the last three decades has produced some fantastic music (provided he doesn't sing... Sorry, Steve).

After 'Wind and Wuthering' came 'Then There Were Three' - in which Genesis, stripped of its personalities, became a pop band. Really, Phil Collins' solo albums were better; the material wasn't much different and the session musicians were far better than poor old Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks. (I mentioned virtuosity earlier on - Mike and Tony could play, for sure, and made some excellent contributions to some very complex arrangements. But Chris Squire and Rick Wakeman, from Yes, could eat them for breakfast. Once the complex arrangements had gone, there wasn't much left of interest).

To sum up - you should buy this album, for 'Blood on the Rooftops','Unquiet Slumbers for the Sleepers...' '...In that Quiet Earth' and 'One for the Vine'. This is really good music. The rest of it is notable for its early indications of a band transmuting into something else. I don't like what Genesis became. You might disagree. Either way, I'd say that this is the last shout of anything like the 'old Genesis' Buy it and see what you think. It's worth it, just so you can have an informed opinion.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vastly improved on the original, 8 April 2007
Of all the five Genesis albums that have recently been re-mixed and re-released, this is probably the one that has gained the most from its new stereo mix (I have not heard the surround mix). The original recording and mix was done in a substandard studio (by professional standards), hence the poor tonal separation and cheap reverb soaking every instrument and vocal.

But stripped of these artefacts and treated to the latest digital reverbs and compressors, hearing the new version is like having the wax removed from your ears, it's all so clear!

'Wind' was always my favourite Genesis album, partly because I feel this is Tony Banks (my favourite composer of the band) at the top of his game, creating drama and beauty in his chord movements and arrangements, and fine contributions from the other members too.

But the songs always suffered from all that heavy reverb and a buried lead vocal, non more so than 'Eleventh Earl Of Marr'. No more though. As with 'Trick' and '...Three' but to an even greater extent, this mix is a massive improvement on the original.

The downside, as with all the five re-releases, is a slightly over-zealous compression applied to the whole mix (possibly added at mastering stage), making it sound a little squashed and suffocated. But since the improvement over the original is so great, this is easily tolerated.

Not much in the way of DVD extras to speak of, other than a fine section of the interview which spreads over all the discs. It is very enjoyable to watch, especially as the usually shy Tony Banks speaks eloquently and passionately about this, one of his favourite Genesis albums.

Buy it, and ditch your 'definitive remaster' edition.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, but should have been stupifying, 28 Sep 2008
By 
K. O'Leary (Milton Keynes, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I've read so many reviews on the net regarding these discs I just had to add my two penneth worth.

Firstly, to anyone who cannot hear the stifling compression on these new remasters, there is a very simple test which I assure you will prove it to anybody, be they I-Pod philistine or just plain hard of hearing. If you play the definitive re-mastered CD version of Eleventh Earl of Marl and listen out in the second verse for the line starting "backwards and forwards", you can hear Phil spit this line out with a very clear expulsion of air from his lungs. If you then play the same from the SACD version (you'll need to adjust the volume down to compensate), that bite of the first syllable has completely evaporated, along with the added emotional weight of course. It's night and day, and nothing less than vandalism.

What you get instead when listening to that line, is perfect clarity and enunciation. And that is generally the trade off in all other respects as well. These discs are hugely superior; they have a much more expansive soundstage, startling clarity, and bigger, smoother bass. The crime is that without the compression they could have been monumental. I will continue to play the SACDs, but I'm always going to be thinking of how they should have sounded.

Turning to the other tracks; "One for the Vine" has great bass wallop at the first "Follow me" chorus, although the drums appear a little drowned out at this point. Also, the piano during the development section and the end is occasionally accompanied by a strange "thumping", which I presume is either a sticky key or the sustain pedals in use, if that is indeed what it is, it speaks volumes for the clarity of SACD.

The weakest track in my view is certainly "Your Own Special Way". Genesis' first true "pop" song, it is extremely bland with rather childish lyrics about someone having their hand held (a six year old?). there is also a little electric piano interlude towards the end to help it sound like 10cc. Still, a lot of other people love this song.

"Mouses Night" is often dismissed by many fans, I presume because of the subject matter; a mouse escaping a cat (isn't this a perfect theme for a Genesis song?). I've always thought of this as a highlight and possibly my favourite song on the album. I love Collin's use of bass drum on this track, and there's a beautiful Hackett guitar solo towards the end as well.

"Blood on the Rooftops" movingly explores the lives of an elderly couple who have wasted year after year in front of the TV; a brilliant and unusual subject I have always thought. The original CD releases displayed some pretty ragged and distorted bass pedals, this has now been completely rectified. In fact, this edition's rendering is almost perfect in most respects. It also suffers the least from "compression damage" as well.

All of the instrumentals sound superb, "Wot Gorilla" has wonderful shimmering Crotales, pretty amazing in the 5.1 mixes actually, and "Slumbers...Quiet Earth" has some really evil sounding synth sounds that grip the listener right in the pit of the stomach.

I've always found the fans favourite "Afterglow" a little bit of a dirge; it slowly builds up from an arpeggio guitar theme without a chorus, middle eight or development section to keep interest. It reminds me a lot of the closing section to the "Musical Box" - should be good then? well, I think it's OK, but the more I hear it the less I like it.

To conclude, these discs are the best releases soundwise of these great albums, but it's a travesty knowing what could of been. I should also add that although I have heard the DTS 5.1, my comments are regarding the SACD stereo mix. I understand the purpose of multi-channel sound in respect to moving pictures, but I'm not too sure about it as far as music goes; I can't make my mind up on where I'm supposed to be sitting.

BTW, I would ignore the murmurings from some quarters that the brilliant defintive edition CDs are to be pulled leaving only the SACD hybrids on sale, the two big retailers I visited in Milton Keynes only had two of the new Genesis discs between them, and had no interest in restocking these or any other SACD/DVD-A.
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