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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Move as they have never been heard before!
This is The Move's 3rd album originally released by the group in 1970 and introduces Jeff Lyne to the line up after the departure of Trevor Burton and Carl Wayne.

What makes this newly released reissue stand out is that it is superbly remastered and expanded. The sound quality is simply mind blowing and multi instrumentalists Roy Wood and Jeff Lynne's talents...
Published on 24 April 2008 by Iain

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, yes but not easy on the ear
It's 1970. Enter Jeff Lynne. And begin The Move's attempt to get in sync with the new decade. LOOKING ON is heavy and dense and resembles neither The Move which preceeded it nor that which came after. This is basically hard rock with a few eccentric moments like Roy Wood inserting discordant cello and oboe for no other reason than he can. Those diversions do provide some...
Published 14 months ago by ds


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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Move as they have never been heard before!, 24 April 2008
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This review is from: Looking On (Audio CD)
This is The Move's 3rd album originally released by the group in 1970 and introduces Jeff Lyne to the line up after the departure of Trevor Burton and Carl Wayne.

What makes this newly released reissue stand out is that it is superbly remastered and expanded. The sound quality is simply mind blowing and multi instrumentalists Roy Wood and Jeff Lynne's talents are shown off to maximum effect. Full credit must go to all of those involved in producing this cd from the old master tapes.

The material on this album is much heavier than on the group's previous albums and singles and several of the tracks are over 6 minutes in length. The two most well known tracks are "Brontosaurus" and "When Alice Comes Back to the Farm".

The cd is presented in a neat digipak and there is a 16 page booklet full of notes and photographs of the group.

This album is not for those who prefer to remember The Move for their better known singles as the band had moved on a long way from those days.
However this cd is worth buying just for the wonderful sound quality and is a must for fans of Roy Wood and Jeff Lynne. Not long after this album was completed the duo formed The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) before Wood finally split and went off to form Wizzard.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cinderalla goes to the ball..., 27 April 2008
This review is from: Looking On (Audio CD)
Their 'Flowers in The Rain' launching Britain's BBC Radio 1 back in '67, paisley popsters The Move tipped the toys out of the pram in 1970 when they made their most compelling and original album in 'Looking On'. Key changes at play were the swing to more serious 'progressive' sounds and the arrival in Jeff Lynne of a writing partner Roy Wood could really spar with. Left to their own devices in the studio by new label Fly - distracted by ingenue signing Marc Bolan - the two got to work fusing hard rock with doo-wop, bar room boogie and chamber, crossing amplified sawing cello, piping oboes, sitar and squalls of lead guitar, the multi-textured melange driven solidly by the hod-carrying backline of bassist Rick Price and drummer, Bev Bevan while over it all piped the trademark megaphone vocal. The result: dense, melodic, melodramatic - contrived to be both raw and sophisticated. The singles 'Brontosaurus' and 'When Alice Comes Back To The Farm' are respectively lumbering and manic, while the lengthier 'What?' and 'Open up Said The World At The Door' indicate the door marked 'Electric Light Orchestra', a vehicle Lynne would have fired up right away but for contractual obligations. Cheaply-packaged, 'Looking On' limped out and was left. But this top notch reissue more than makes up for the injustice: beautifully re-mastered, lusterous gatefold digi-pack, plenty of period imagery, highly-informed and entertaining notes from Mark Paytress, expanded with studio out-takes and the 'Brontosaurus' B-side. Good-bye 'Blackberry Way' and Hallo 'Mr Blue Sky' by way of 'Paranoid', the Cinderella in The Move catalogue finally goes to the ball.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, progressive thunder from the Black Country, 18 Sept. 2005
By 
Adriano (Berkshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Looking on (remastered) (Audio CD)
Four hairy, bearded Brummies walk into a studio in 1970, wearing shades (probably).

Bev Bevan (drums & percussion), Rick Price (Bass), Jeff Lynne (piano, guitar, etc.) and Roy Wood (any and every instrument he had at his disposal).

I remember buying this album on vinyl back in the early 1970s. The two singles ('Brontosaurus' and 'Alice') were the heaviest and loudest the Move ever released. I loved the way Roy Wood gave the vocals everything - this before the days vocalists experimented with megaphones. He continued to adopt this style of delivery later on with Until Your Momma's Gone and Wizzard's debut 45, 'Ball Park Incident' amongst other classic Wood compositions.

On first listening, 'Looking On' left me dazed. The only hint that these hit single-makers may head in a darker direction was the blistering 'Hello Suzie' - the opening track on the previous 'Shazam' album.

The opening title track (very Sabbath) and the closing 'Feel Too Good' are epic monsters - both long multi-instrumental songs dominated with heavy guitar riffs and drums. These, and Bev Bevan's 'Turkish Tram Conductor Blues' - again, vocals by Roy Wood along with the two singles are not the whole story, monumental though they are.

This was the first time Jeff Lynne worked in the studio with The Move after Wood finally persuaded him to replace original front man Carl Wayne.

On subsequent plays, I found that the brace of Lynne songs: 'What?' and 'Open Up, Said The World At The Door' balance the whole album with their experimental effects and Jeff's now-familiar voice. A very definite nod to the future ELO.

The album closes with an unlisted bit of studio fun (a prank to be repeated on the following years 'Message From The Country' - the only Wood/Lynne co-credited song ever - the silliness of 'My Marge'). A much-needed lightness to ease the senses after all the heaviness. Recent sources identify this as 'The Duke Of Edinburgh's Lettuce'.

While I'm on trivia - rumours did suggest PP Arnold contributed backing vocals to `Feel Too Good' - her itinerary at the time of recording matches this possibility. Back then, I believed this is mere speculation, though I loved the image it brought to mind. Recent research for the anniversary edition confirms this is indeed true, our first lady of soul is contributing along with Doris Troy...wow. The stuff of legend.

And more recently, this track can be heard on the soundtrack (CD Vol II) to the film Boogie Nights.

So, although the heaviest album either Wood or Lynne ever recorded, do not be fooled by first impressions. This session uses many, many instruments not usually associated with rock'n'roll. But never over-used: there's no wall of sound here. It's raw and nasty, melodic, twangy and inaccessible (at first) - in some places there are soundscapes so trippy you'll wish they would never end. After all this was originally a seven-track prog-rock session. Seven long tracks.

This CD reissue includes singles and b-sides belonging more to the `Shazam' era (but there was probably no room for any more bonus tracks on that CD) - but when these four boys checked into the studio to record this album no one ever saw The Move as flowery sixties popsters again.

Thirty-five years on I'm still playing it and never tired of listening to it from the opening drums of the title to the closing barrelhouse of The Duke's Lettuce...ah, nostalgia. Love it you guys.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars monstrous!, 26 Sept. 2007
This review is from: Looking on (remastered) (Audio CD)
amount of tracks (not including bonus tacks) :7
excellent :4
v.good :1
good :2
fair :0
poor :0

if you wanna know where queen 'borrowed' their style from look no further than this album. the move were a quite fantastic pop act, and of roy wood there can be no praise high enough - surely THE most under-rated british songwriter of them all. the moves pop hits during the late 60's were easily as good, if not better, than anything the beatles or the stones were turning out (especially 'blackberry way' surely one of the greatest singles ever released) by 1970 the band were close to imploding, theyd released the patchy 'shazam' which, however, contained one track 'cherry blossom clinic', which was a staggeringly good song and was kind of a pointer for where they were going next.

which was here! in 'looking on' the band straddled the heavy rock sound which peaked in 1970 (even genesis were heavy in 1970!!), and came up with a real masterpeice. the album is very heavy, but with a very unusual and completely original sound. listen to the track 'open up said the world at the door' and then tell me that queen didnt base their entire sound on the move! right down to the multi-tracked harmonies

this is quite simply an incredible, indispensible slice of pop/rock/heavy rock/metal/prog/folk history which defies categorization! (as you can tell!)overlooked for too long, the move were one of the greatest bands of all time , and as for roy wood, well, the man was a musical genius. buy this album and i promise your chin will be on the floor in amazement at its brilliance! class with a capital C
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4.0 out of 5 stars Looking back on Looking On, 29 Mar. 2015
By 
The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Looking On (Audio CD)
`Looking On' recorded in 1970 was Jeff Lynne's debut with The Move, persuaded to join by fellow Brummie Roy Wood following the departure of Carl Wayne and Trevor Burton. The resultant band became a talented three-piece: multi-instrumentalists Wood and Lynne, and drummer Bev Bevan.

The character of the music is much more 1970s-prog-rock than The Move's previous pop-oriented recordings. The 2008 re-issue is superbly remastered and expanded with 7x bonus tracks, most of them alternative takes of those on the original album.

The original album tracks benefit most from re-mastering the analog tapes. Long `heavy' numbers like the opener `Looking On' and closer `Feel Too Good' are juxtaposed with thumping rockers `Brontosaurus' and the rock-and-roll influenced `When Alice Comes Back to the Farm'. Jeff's `What?' and `Open Up Said the World at the Door' enrich the album and offer contrast to the heavier Roy Wood-influenced sounds.

Following the indifferent `Shazam', the ELO debut set Jeff Lynne on a new direction. `Looking On' is therefore a one-off with a character all its own, never repeated but interesting for fans of 1970s rock music especially for its inventive arrangements and deployment of non-standard instrumentation (cello for example, with a classic 9-note riff deploying its own time-signature in `When Alice comes back to the Farm').
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5.0 out of 5 stars Simply Wizard, 19 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: Looking On (Audio CD)
Roy Wood should have been credited for far more than he was. The Move was definitely a happening band at the time that this recording originally appeared. And after several listenings, one begins to wonder how significant this album was in influencing other younger musicians. A rock solid album that easily stands the test of time.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still Underrated After All These Years..., 13 April 2010
By 
Og Oggilby "Og Oggilby" (North London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Looking On (Audio CD)
With the introduction of Jeff Lynne and the departure of Carl Wayne to cabaret, The Move finally addressed the 1970s with 'Looking On', a powerful collection that picks up where 'Shazam', it's predecessor left off. What Lynne brought to the band was a distinctive new compositional voice, as well as some keyboard expertise that Roy Wood, even allowing for his vast instrumental prowess, simply didn't have.

'Looking On' has been reissued a number of times, but this Salvo edition finally accords it the treatment that the rich musical fare contained within it has always deserved. Tracks such as 'Open Up Said The World At The Door' and 'What' are densely arranged but thrilling prog-rock exercises (but always with a commercial edge), and the hit single', 'Brontosaurus' was always a pleasing hard rock outing that has never sounded better than herein. The failed single, 'When Alice Comes Back From The Farm' anticipates the sound of the ELO with it's cello emebllishments, and although I've never been greatly enamoured of 'Turkish Tram Conductor Blues' and 'Feel Too Good', they do sound much better in the context of the whole album.

Although the album is vastly different from their '68 poppy debut, and their final album, 'Message From The Country', which offered more stylistic range and concise songs, the sandwich filler of the 'Shazam' album, and 'Looking On', offer the listener a lot of tasty musical morsels to chew on. Recommended.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Looking Up, 21 Jun. 2008
This review is from: Looking On (Audio CD)
One of the more important bands of their time and in Roy Wood probably the most unheralded and under appreciated talent of his era. This was a further development of some of the ideas from Shazam, at least as far as tracks like 'Hello Suzie' are concerned.

It was largely ignored because of the record labels focus of attention on label mates T Rex and perhaps by the band because they wanted to get on with ELO. How does it stand up on its own? In my book very well. This is probably the heaviest album The Move ever did, with tracks like 'Turkish Tram Conductor Blues', 'Brontosaurus', 'When Alice Comes Back to the Farm' and the title track (very Black Sabbath a la Ozzy vocals by Roy Wood).

Is it a bit overlong and overpomped in places? Well yes but at its heart it shows two great talents finding their feet with each other and reveling in it. They would do a better job with the next and last Move album and get Bev more involved but as a listen its well worth it, especially if you are a bit of a 'banger'.

The remastered sound brings out a lot more than my unmastered cheapy box set and the work put into the album is even more appreciated. If you like the genre you should like this.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Looking on takes us back, 17 Oct. 2010
By 
Samuel Pyke (Barcelona) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Looking On (Audio CD)
First, the music: the Move, one of a number of fine rock bands from the Birmingham area (UK), were always on the move, as their track record richly confirms. They were not a very proliferous band, but what they released is all worth listening to carefully. The need to put out singles material (60's mentality) is evident, but they certainly proved themselves to be capable of creating a lot of fun serious music. This album is enjoyable because they didn't take themselves too seriously. It was their third album, released in 1970. Shazam, their second offering, is full of good music and good humour, too. It remains my favourite, but Looking On will not disappoint, despite its being rather overlooked. The music is on the heavy side, and the album perhaps lacks a gentler ballad or two, but it contains some fine material. The bonus tracks provide an opportunity to hear how they played around with their own songs before settling on a final version to release. What comes over is the fact that they really did enjoy themselves in the process of making music. Just listen to Feel Too Good (both the full song and the rough mix). Great!
And now for the product: Very tastefully packaged, with some nice photos, good liner notes and a mock-vinyl disc. My only doubt is whether the non-standard size (five and a quarter inches square, or roughly thirteen and a half cm ) will appeal to everybody. If all cd sleeves had been made to these measurements, much the better; but now these sleeves mix poorly with the standard ones.
But what's that compared to over an hour's worth of good music that takes you back to one of the most creative moments in rock's history?
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars THE MOVE'S SEMINAL MOMENT CAPTURED, 3 Aug. 2010
This review is from: Looking On (Audio CD)
`Looking On' the band's third album, marks their brief foray into the world of the `album band', sandwiched between their late 1960s pop output, and the more folkie pop singles of the early 1970s. This `move' is helped by the arrival of former Idle Race front man, Jeff Lynne, replacing the cabaret-singer wannabee, Carl Wayne. The tracks are longer too, with Roy's contributions leaning in the `hard-rock' direction, notably the title track, whilst Jeff's compositions, such as `What If' and `Open up Said the World at the Door', are lyrical and decidedly `proggie'. Indeed, this was a very creative period for the band. The `Electric Light Orchestra' project was actually conceived during the recording of this album, with 10538 Overture originally penned for, and due to appear on `Looking On'. (Roy also contributes cello to another of the album's tracks: `When Alice Comes back to the Farm'). The cello-drenched 10538 Overture was subsequently withdrawn and put aside, and herein lies the album's only apparent weakness. To fill the void left by the `Overture', the weaker track `Feel Too Good' was substituted, or expanded, to make up the numbers, resulting in a disappointing climax to the record. This aside, the album's re-release with extra tracks is most welcome, and worthy of far more listeners than it got the first time round.
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