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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic
I remember watching these made-for-TV films in the 1990s, usually scheduled for late morning on a Saturday. So gripped was I by them that I would arrange my day around their broadcast time. They are lavishly produced, almost to rival the original films of Indiana Jones. Their plots are beautifully fanciful, with many historical figures woven into the plots. The acting is...
Published on 2 Feb. 2009 by HughOSB

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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable if shallow history series
The concluding volume of the "Adventures of Young Indiana Jones" typifies much of what is very good about this series but also shows the kind of flaws that let it down at times. As ever, the documentaries that accompany the episodes (detailing further the events and historical figures Indiana Jones becomes involved with) are as engrossing as the episodes themselves...
Published on 20 Mar. 2009 by Alain English


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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable if shallow history series, 20 Mar. 2009
By 
Alain English (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
The concluding volume of the "Adventures of Young Indiana Jones" typifies much of what is very good about this series but also shows the kind of flaws that let it down at times. As ever, the documentaries that accompany the episodes (detailing further the events and historical figures Indiana Jones becomes involved with) are as engrossing as the episodes themselves.

This box-set sees Indy (again played by Sean Patrick Flannery) survive World War One, attempt a reconciliation with his father back home and become involved with gangsters, Broadway stage actors, and Hollywood film directors during his time at university.

The best episodes are "Masks of Evil", where Indy has a tragic love affair working in Istanbul and is then sent to Transylvania, in probably his first encounter with the supernatural, to tackle a crazed descendant of Vlad the Impaler who is raising an army of the dead. The first part is notable for it's complex realism, and the second part for it's hoary but still enjoyable Gothic horror imagery.

An intriguing episode is "Winds of Change" where Indy finds himself in France at the end of World War One, and faces the horrifying treatment of the Germans, who unfairly shoulder blame for the entire war as well as marginalised individuals like the Vietnamese whose fate is cruelly ignored in the process. This episode some good thoughts on the nature of war and evil, and an excellent recreation of the tortured President Woodrow Wilson by actor Josef Summer. Lloyd Owen also makes a welcome return as Indy's distant father.

"Mystery of the Blues" is bookended by 1950 segment with Harrison Ford playing an older Indy recounting his days at college playing the blues. It is terrific to see Ford playing Indy again, and it also features great performances from Jeffrey Wright as jazz musician Sidney Bichet and Nicholas Turturro in a chilling depiction of a young Al Capone.

The series suffers significantly in translation to these DVD editions, and many of it's flaws are exposed. The DVD documentaries, in exploring the people Indy meets in more depth, expose at times their comparatively shallow portrayal in the series. As the series was originally shot out of chronological sequence (with George Hall playing an elderly Indy randomly recalling events from his youth), the episodes don't always follow on coherently from each other in the DVD format. Crucial to this is the depiction of Indiana Jones himself. In spite of all he goes through (war, intrigue, countless love affairs and near-death experiences), he never seems really affected or changed by what happens to him. It's not really Sean Patrick Flannery's fault, as the original format of the show would have hindered his developing a proper through-line for his character, but throughout the show Indy is played in pretty much the same way. This reduces the audiences ability to properly relate to him and damages his believability as a character.

These are tiny nit-picks, though, and it shouldn't put anyone off buying this boxset, as it continues the high performance and production standards of the first two. Recommended for history buffs and hardcore Indiana Jones fans.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 2 Feb. 2009
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
I remember watching these made-for-TV films in the 1990s, usually scheduled for late morning on a Saturday. So gripped was I by them that I would arrange my day around their broadcast time. They are lavishly produced, almost to rival the original films of Indiana Jones. Their plots are beautifully fanciful, with many historical figures woven into the plots. The acting is excellent, with many special guest stars of fame. The hero, except in the early boyhood episodes, is played by Sean Patrick Flannery, who was born for the role. These are ripping good yarns, a joy to watch, a worthy addition to any collection that likes a little adventure inlcuded.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AWESOME, 12 Sept. 2010
By 
Mr. D. L. Rees "LEE DAVID" (DORSET) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
Sean Patrick Flanery is the young Indiana (here to turn 20) - forever at the centre of major events, unable to travel in any direction without meeting someone famous or destined to be....

10 discs, one of them inter-active. 7 feature length adventures. 15+ hours of absorbing follow-up documentaries.

The result stuns, valuable insights given of turbulent, rapidly changing times:- The end of The Great War; The Paris Peace Conference (greedy victors unwittingly sowing seeds for World War II and a host of other major troubles); Prohibition; Colour Prejudice; the Births of Jazz, Musical Comedies and Films. Excellent documentaries tell of Hemingway, Al Capone, Eliot Ness, Paul Robeson, Louis Armstrong, Dracula (yes, Indy meets Vlad!). Most moving perhaps is the account of Harlem's Hellfighters - denied the recognition deserved for their war heroism. Amongst other illuminating features are those on the creation of modern Iraq and the background to Vietnam.

There are weaknesses. Indy is at times unconvincingly propelled into new situations; attempts at comedy do not always work; it is hard to believe in some of the younger depictions (especially of Hemingway), though others (Robeson, etc.) are splendid; Indy's repeatedly falling for the latest pretty face becomes tiresome. Overall, however, there is fun and much to please - not least Sean Patrick Flanery's spirited performance.

In one episode Harrison Ford himself appears, the older Indy reminiscing. In fact all three boxed sets skilfully pave the way for the films - as with the portrayal of Indy's uneasy relationship with his dad.

An ideal family present. Initially it will entertain in the spirit of the films, but let it not end there. The documentaries are an education in themselves, opening eyes and provoking thought.

Wholeheartedly recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good conclusion to the series, 15 Aug. 2009
By 
J. R. Pack "julianpack" (Equatorial Guinea) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
Having watched the final set, my fears that it would pale in comparison with the second set have been unfounded. There are some very good episodes here, and the intial (perceived) weaknesses (more swashbuckling and supernatural themes) have turned out to be strengths; after all, these things are the cornerstone of the four Ford feature films and set the tone for those films. Here also is some good food for thought - as a couple of other reviewers have stated, the 'Winds of Change' is excellent and the completion of Indy's war-disillusionment. Like other reviewers, I do wish he would talk a bit more about the war and its affects; not that he should be shell-shocked, but just something a bit more human - the only attempt at this is made in the 'Mystery of the Blues', which would have been an excellent opportunity to explore this more within the context/juxtaposition of the quiet seat of learning. However, in Indy's defence, I have heard it said that the ideal soldier is a sixteen year old boy (in a man's body), as he'll do things in war that no man would and be less affected by them, which may go some way to account for his recklessness and ingenuousness in the earlier war years.

By way of criticism, I would point to that there has been some tinkering with chronology here and Hemingway's being wounded (unavoidably June 1918) is grossly at odds with the 1917-referenced episode that directly follows. Does mean that there's, in theory, a huge gap of October 1917 (close of boxset 2) and the Italian section. The Hemingway episode is I think highly important - I have always felt that the young Indy character was superego of Hem, owing much to his life: even the same birthday (July 1899) - as such poor Hemingway is shown to be ingenuous and brash, wholly inspired by meeting Indy. I was also uncomfortable about the 1950s Ford parts included in 'Mystery of the Blues': they are interesting, but do break the train of events - if Ford, why not George Hall then? (That's rhetorical, by the way.) The last three episodes do tail off a bit, but at least attempt to capture the era and prove good fun, but the shouting Prussian Stroheim is at odds with the real softly spoken Austrian Stroheim.

Anyway, for my money, the best episodes are 'Winds of Change' (with 'father' Lloyd Owen back and some exploration of their relations); the Istanbul/Transylvannia one; and 'Eye of the Peacock' (Remy back again). Educationally, I still think this series is good. It never pretends more. Likewise, criticism of war scenes and other content avoids the fact that the series was/is pitched at a young audience. The acting is sufficient - Flanery does what has been required of him and is mostly sympathetic. One of its greatest strengths is the emphasis on speaking of languages - it's been the message from start to finish: communicating in a foreign language is one of the greatest things in the world, and anything that promotes that in young people, cannot be bad.

So, go on, treat yourself to the final slice of the adventure - you won't regret it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Has aged remarkably well, 16 Sept. 2012
By 
Chappers "chappers" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
Has aged remarkably well

This review is a combined one for all three seasons of Young Indiana.

I remembered watching some of these as a youth. They sparked a free-spirited ambition in a lot of boys and girls of the era I'm sure. When I saw them on offer at amazon I figured I'd snap them all up to re-live some of my past, being an Indie fan anyway.

Turns out, I'd probably not seen over 50% of the full series as I couldn't remember a lot of it.

Season one sees Indie (Henry Junior) as a boy, played by Cory Carrier, who never really seemed to carry on in acting. His father was talently played by Lloyd Owen who sounds the spit of Sean Connery's depiction in the earlier feature-films, which really helped with the feeling of continuity. Margaret Tyzack rounds out the key characters from my opinion, playing the part of Indie's tutor, Miss Seymour. I don't feel Indie's mother was much of a character and was incidental to most of the series.

During the season, you see him being the insolent youth you expect, perhaps rather big-headed and overly arrogant in his portrayal (perhaps reasons why Cory didn't go on to much more?). They travel from place to place, meeting various important and note-worthy people from that era.

As you enter season 2, Indie quickly ages into the dashing figure of Sean Patrick Flanery, and we see his portrayal through "The War Years" where he progresses up through the ranks in the Belgian Army with his pal Remy. Again, various note-worthy occasions, and the odd dash of archeology, but mostly it's his cheeky mis-adventures through the era that endears. I would say this is my favourite season and contains the episodes that I recalled from my youth.

Finally, we come to season 3 where Indie eventually comes out of the War, yet seems to regress into the shadow of his former pre-war life, struggling to get to grips with a stable career. I half-expected this season to be all about the archeology, but it kind of skits round that point. [spoiler alert!] Remy gets swept aside relatively suddenly like some old sock, and various episodes of this season come across as a bit slap-stick and rather un-fitting of the series as a whole. A bit disappointing really.

On the whole, I really did enjoy the series, although as I have mentioned, it perhaps didn't quite go down the road of archeological exploration that I was perhaps hoping for, and that was certainly encouraged in the first season.

One thing that certainly is a boon in this series on DVD is the wide selection of well-shot documentaries that cover the themes at the time. These are all well worth viewing, and help to lend an educational arm to the series to help you learn a bit more about how some of the stories came to being.
The series has been editted about so that episode merge in the right places to form decent length viewings, and it is all done in a relatively seamless fashion.

Despite it's failings, I would still rate the whole series 5-stars at the price I got it for on amazon (about £9 per season at time of purchase). If you end up paying more, I'd probably drop the rating down to 4-stars, and considering that the current price on amazon is around the £18-19 mark, I'll let it sit at 4 for now.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great documentaries/drama, 13 Mar. 2009
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
Great fiction and good acting but the gem is really in the documentaries that accompany the set. Photos, footage, and well-written and researched histories in short 30 minute videos that won't bore you and enhance viewability of the drama series itself!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 14 May 2009
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
This show is great, not only for fans of Idiana Jones, but also for people who are interested in history. It's accuracy of historical events is quite accurate, apart from Indiana Jones, a fictional character, metting up with the famous people presented in the shows, the accuracy of events depicted is very well done. The documentaries are good enough on their own even without the show but with the show they create a brilliant roundign effect to watching the shows. I bought this DVD under the impression that, perhaps, this boxset wouldn't be as good as the other two but I was soon proven wrong. The stories are fast with blends of horror, Masks of Evil, comedy, Hollywood Follies, music, Mystery of the Blues and Scandal of the 1920's, and adventure, Treasure of the Peacock's Eye. I think, however, that the key to this whole boxset is Winds of Change, it may show Indy is a more relaxed mood after the war, until he meets his Dad, but it shows a human side to Indy that would have been totally lost if the writers had gone straight from war to high adventure stories. I recommend this boxset to fans of Indiana Jones and lovers of history as both these groups of people can appreciate this series for what it is; a fun look at historically relevent tales from the viewpoint of one of fictions greatest adventure heroes.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly good, 3 Dec. 2012
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
I'm really happy with the quality of this pack and don't regret the purchase at all.
A must have for every Indiana Jones fan.
The first pack (volume 1) is about 1.5 times the size of the others (volume 2 & 3) - in thickness, the general measures are the same.
It's a nice glossy outer box carton (unfortunately a bit spoiled with age restriction stickers). The retrievable foldable disk container is made to resemble a book. It unfolds to give way to the DVDs.

I don't like the disk holder system that is being used in volume 1 and 3 so much. You have to push the disk sideways into a groove against a spring that then presses it upwards underneath two little pins to keep the disk in place. This mechanism is prone to scratch the discs over time. I prefer the standard system of the central clip that is used in volume 2.

The DVDs are region 2.
The picture ratio is 4:3.
The quality is DVD typical. With a software player you can get slightly increased quality with HD simulation, but nothing comparable to real HD - a pity that this probably is as good as it gets, for this series most likely won't ever come to blu-ray.
The films have been revised - I think - to offer the best quality that was derivable from the TV-material (without to much costly efforts - this time George Lucas could have let of some steam and go wild on this material to carry it over to HD). But this TV-series, on the other hand, relies more on the story anyways, much more than on scenery and picture quality.

Audio and Subtitles are English only.
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5.0 out of 5 stars must see, 16 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
This is excellent so very well done very well crafted the bonus DVD are definitely worth watching if you missed this catch up and see this.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Homenagem justa!, 1 Feb. 2013
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This review is from: The Adventures Of Young Indiana Jones Vol.3 (10-Disc-Set) [DVD] (DVD)
Uma linda homenagem ao Indiana Jones! Seriado fiel aos filmes. Pena não ter legendas ou áudio em português Brasil!
Recomendo a todos!
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