Customer Reviews


129 Reviews
5 star:
 (71)
4 star:
 (28)
3 star:
 (13)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (14)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ULTRA VIOLENT!!! READ ON...
Past years have seen one or two football violence related movies; The Football Factory, Green Street, together with numerous hardcore violent British Gangster flicks; Gangster No.1, The Business, Layer Cake etc.
This film, partially based on 1995 true events, melds these two genres together to form a critical mass!
There's no getting away, that this is a...
Published on 19 May 2008 by Adam Jackson

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK film
Bought this for my other half and he didn't think it was as great as it was recommended, thought it would be more about west ham but it's about his life with very little reference to west ham. It's not a football hooligan film, it's a gangster film
Published on 1 Jan 2011 by Amazon Customer


‹ Previous | 1 213 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ULTRA VIOLENT!!! READ ON..., 19 May 2008
By 
Adam Jackson "Symphonic Metal Fan" (Stoke On Trent , England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Past years have seen one or two football violence related movies; The Football Factory, Green Street, together with numerous hardcore violent British Gangster flicks; Gangster No.1, The Business, Layer Cake etc.
This film, partially based on 1995 true events, melds these two genres together to form a critical mass!
There's no getting away, that this is a shocking & at times disturbing film. The football hooligan scenes are even more violent than either Green Street or Football Factory (Once again, West Ham v Millwall), and as we move into Gangland waters, there are scenes of torture that rival either of the Hostel movies! People are stabbed, bitten, beaten & there's some very graphic gunplay. Oh, lest we forget - fingers hacked off, teeth pulled out with pliers and an all over crucifixion! The only film of it's type to rival these shocking scenes is the horrifying Gangster No.1!
It's also completeley foul-mouthed from start to finish - with the now customary excessive use of the C-word.
Also, there's some very scantily dressed ladies on show, usually draped across Craig Fairbrass (who seems to revel in the role of loose cannon Pat Tate).
I can almost guarantee the appeal of this to many people - I enjoyed it - All of us like to look at the dark side of life, but this is a world that 99.9% of us would never want to experience!
It's well directed, with capable performances all around. Parallels could be drawn between central performer Ricci Harnett as the infamous ICF General/organised criminal, Carlton Leach & Ray Liotta's acclaimed performance in Goodfellas. I'm not saying the quality is the same but Scorsese's film has clearly inspired. As in Football Factory, Gangster No.1 etc, we have the voice over throughout the film, and it's one of the better examples.
I really liked the cinematography & the editing - far less of the 'music video' feel that often blights many Brit films at the moment!
And how can you knock a movie that gives us football punch ups to the sound of Motorhead's We Are The Road Crew!!
I have to say I thought it was a better movie than Nick Love's Outlaw which had the potential to be so much more.
This is just a good film to have some mates around, crack open a few cans and see who looks away first!
Definiteley not one for the girlfriends...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Uncomfortably Powerful Insight, 17 May 2008
Avoid this film if you don't like visceral, gratuitous violence presented with a bone-crunching sense of reality by very disagreeable and highly dysfunctional people cranked up on booze, coke and steroids. Apart from that I have to reluctantly concede that this unpleasant British film is well made and well acted, with a menace and power that similar American films simply can't equal. Based on real events, the film portrays the rise of dedicated football thugs from the tribal terraces to the lofty heights of Essex nightclubs, vacuous blondes, and serious crime. Eventually it all goes wrong - or went wrong, because the conclusion to the film ended up in the newspapers of the day, and it seems we're still not sure if the right people were sent to prison for the final bloody crimes. Strong, well-executed (pun intended), and drenched in poisonous testosterone, this film is not only rabid in nature, it could also be upsetting to those of a sensitive disposition. Worth checking out, then.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "When coke deals go bad...", 29 Aug 2007
Let's face it; Reservoir Dogs wasn't so much a movie about a diamond heist gone wrong as it was about a gang of actors that wanted to be Lee Marvin. Rise of the Footsoldier (Released 7th of September) is nothing more or less than a bunch of Scorsese fanatics who wished they'd been in Goodfellas - and be fair, who wouldn't?

`Footsoldier' is a gangster film - pure and simple. "Professional" Football hooligans the I.C.F (Inner City Firm) have met their nemesis with a spate of high profile arrests. With the emergence of the `rave' scene of the late 80's they recognise the lucre generating possibilities of the new counter culture; get `loved up', `steam' the groovy train and swap their Stanley knives and knuckle dusters for smiley T. Shirts, Kickers and eh... shotguns. Quickly establishing themselves as major `faces' in the Essex underworld, it isn't long before these Knights of the glass table are running their cocaine Camelot through a gamut of girls, guns and high friends in dangerous places.

Based on a real life1995 `hit' which rendered three of those `face's blown off at a secluded dirt track in Retterdon, the cinematic possibilities of what is now known as `The Range Rover Killings' has not been lost on movie land. The semi fictional Essex Boys (2000) took its cue from this pivotal event in gangland history but `Footsoldier' is a more authentic account, retaining the facts and the actual characters as recounted in `Muscle', the book written by one of the surviving members of the gang Carlton Leach, played here by a shark eyed Ricci Harnett.

`Footsoldier' also boasts an impressive array of T.V tough guys including Ex-Eastender's Bill Murray and Craig Fairbrass, whose soap appearances had hitherto had me scrambling for the off switch. Both are excellent here, with Murray exuding menace from every pore and Fairbrass chillingly convincing as the `roid' crazed Pat Tate. Mover and shaker Terry Stone has a face that suggests all the members of the Clash at once and follows his impressive turn in Gilby's last movie, the very excellent `Rollin' With The Nines' as Tony Tucker; a one man swear-a-thon sporting a syrup that looked liked it could have been a stunt double for Dougal in the Magic Roundabout.

Brandishing its Scorsese-isms loudly and proudly (sweeping crane shots, freeze frame voice overs etc) `Footsoldier' is no `feel good' film by any stretch. But there is much to enjoy from watching these guys `go ta woik' in a similar, but darker fashion to ensemble piece `Love, Honour & Obey' (Was I the only one that liked that film?!) or the aforementioned Reservoir Dogs. Perhaps not quite dislodging any of the unholy trinity of Get Carter, Brighton Rock and The Long Good Friday from their lofty throne, Rise of the Foot Soldier doesn't let up for a second and holds its own as a `balls out', `in yer face' thrill ride, and certainly a worthy addition to the `Grit Brit' gangster pantheon.

Adrian Stranik
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a Review for the nex extended cut, 3 Jan 2013
By 
The film will always get 5 stars from me, but the current 4 stars is for this edition.
Now you all must by now know what this film is about so won't go into plots; and I will also not explain what new scenes their are purely that don't want to ruin it for anyone.
Question your probably wondering is do the new scenes add to the film?
Yes and no their are a few scenes that look a bit put on just for the fun of it.
Though some scenes where added and the narration removed which gave the film a better edge, the beginning of the film has an added element to it. Which I liked.
worth it for a die hard fan of Rise of the Footsoldier? yeah I think it is, the steel book cover is nice not the best;
so worth getting yeah I would say so.
But I would keep the original as well.
I know this will probably be a useless review as Didn't want to get into the whole new scenes. but the film holds an extra 20 minutes of footage and re-edits. most of the scenes are good just don't think it adds to it as if this edition never came out wouldn't be a bad thing. That being said if you are a fan or huge fan of the film this edition would be worth getting; as with the good additions are worth the purchase the bad ones can be ignored as very short in length.
new commentary by Julian Gibney and Terry Stone, and a new interview With Julian Gibney who talks about his decision to release the film again and the new scenes
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another superb gutsy British film, 17 Mar 2008
By 
Mrs. A. Marks "filmboff" (england) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This film is what it is a true reflection of the underworld violence and criminal activities of this nation, and anybody that don't believe what goes on need to get a reality check and watch this film. The acting the story was superb nothing short of brilliance for the film industry of this country. I can except that this is not everybody's cup of tea but I thought it was totally brilliant. This film kept me on the edge of my seat through out the 2 hours of film which felt like 2 minutes in my opinion this is a must see film. Well Done again to the british film industry and i salute you
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Never going to be to everyone's taste (but I liked it), 18 Dec 2012
This review is from: Rise Of The Footsoldier - Single Disc Edition [2007] [DVD] (DVD)
Rise of the Footsoldier is an interesting box of tricks. Some people describe it as `Britain's attempt at Goodfellas.' However, I couldn't see that much in common with the American classic. Yes, Footsoldier is about gangsters, but, despite being a `firm' they never came across as that organised in the way the American `Mafia' seems to be portrayed on film.

The film is apparently based on a true story. This is slightly open to interpretation as, in real life, the `truth' is still being debated. In 1995, three gang members were gunned down in a Range Rover in Essex. Footsoldier attempts to explain the motivations behind the murders. It's about Carlton Leach, a small time football hooligan in the early eighties, who works his way up to doorman. Yes, that doesn't sound that much of a `rise' but he also gets involved in some drug operations which elevate his status as an `enforcer.'

However, the story (spanning nearly two) hours, sort of leaves Carlton at about the hour mark and goes off to tell the tale of the three gangsters who will later be killed. This seems to have split audiences. Granted Leach was an unlikeable character (in fact, you may find it hard to find ANYONE in this film who you actually like), but at least he was the `hero' (or antihero possibly). The change of direction is sort of jarring and it put me off a bit on my first watch (I'm reviewing it on my second viewing for the record).

Perhaps Footsoldier is best looked at as a film of two halves. The first half sets up the scene, depicting how the underworld works in and around London, then we see what *might* happen to the three gangsters.

Rise of the Footsoldier is certainly not for everyone. It is extremely violent and bloody. Plus there isn't even any real humour to speak of (ala Lock Stock and Snatch). Our `hero' regular beats up people, including his own wife, leaving little sympathy for his plight. However, I still found it an interesting watch. I don't know how much of it is real. Yes, it is BASED on real events, but I got the impression that a fair amount of artistic licence had been taken with the film.

If you have a strong stomach and you like British gangster films, you may like this. Special mention to Craig Fairbrass for portraying a particularly nasty villain - Joe Pesci, you have just met your British counterpart.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK film, 1 Jan 2011
Bought this for my other half and he didn't think it was as great as it was recommended, thought it would be more about west ham but it's about his life with very little reference to west ham. It's not a football hooligan film, it's a gangster film
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rise of the British, 4 Oct 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Rise of the footsoldier is based on the true events of the Range Rover murders in Essex 1995. This film was an adaptation from the book written by Carlton Leach (former villain and friend to those murdered in '95) The story is based on the life of Carlton Leach, a former football hooligan turn from fighting in the terraces to becoming one of the most respected bouncers in Essex and London. His work then turns from protecting bars and clubs to protecting people and making sure illegal deals get done with no problems. Then people start to get greedy around him and things get a little out of control.

If you enjoyed films like the football factory, the firm and the long good friday then you'll love this. There are alot of familiar faces in the film too. This is not a film for people with weak stomachs or don't like swearing as the violence is quite brutal and the swearing is practically in every sentence.

SPECIAL FEATURES:

* Commentary with Director Julian Gilbey and writer William Gilbey
* Filming the Footsoldier: The making of Rise of the Footsoldier [77mins]
* Interview with Carlton Leach
* Deleted and Extended scenes
* Auditions
* Out-takes
* Image gallery
* Trailer
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars rise of the footsoldier, 12 May 2010
By 
This review is from: Rise Of The Footsoldier - Single Disc Edition [2007] [DVD] (DVD)
not bad but very disappointing in the lack of detail relating to carlton leach's life and escapades and the actor that played him in the movie bore no resemblance to him whatsoever especially in stature.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Its a Way Of Life, but if you live by the sword you will die by it, 25 Feb 2010
By 
P. Frizelle (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In December 1995, the bodies of three notorious figures in London's gangland, were found in a Range Rover on a snowy country road. They were riddled with bullets. Though two men were eventually convicted of their murder, the real story behind it has remained the subject of speculation, and it was previously treated in film in the Sean Bean thriller Essex Boys. Rise Of The Footsoldier takes a slightly different perspective, basing itself on the memoirs of former thug for hire and sometime gang lieutenant Carlton Leach. As well as providing background to the murders, it supplies a string of anecdotes about the London underworld which comprise a loose account of Leach's own rise to power and his gradual understanding of the horror of the world in which he operated.
Blame Guy Ritchie. The late 90s success of Ritchie's cliché-ridden Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels triggered a series of pitiful gangster movies from which the genre never really recovered. Sadly Rise of The Footsoldier, isn't likely to reverse that trend. Despite a decent lead performance from Hartnett, the film falls victim to all-too familiar East End stereotypes. They're either busy blowing someone's brains out or shagging a scantily-clad blonde. Director Julian Gilbey can certainly deliver a punch, but he seems to have mistaken shock for real emotional impact. This is an excellent attempt to bring something new to the crime genre. Those who can stomach it will find it genuinely thrilling and disturbing a repugnant gangland romp in which a group of Neanderthalic, perpetually gurning ruffians get tooled up with axe handles, baseball bats and Stanley knives then knock ten bells out of each other for just shy of two hours. Ultimately, violence aside, there's not a whole lot to this story, and once viewers have time to catch their breath and realise this they'll find that it starts to drag. Ricci Harnett makes a charismatic narrator and turns in a surprisingly affecting performance as Leach, but when he's absent there's little to hold our attention. Although there's some good solid acting from a cast largely borrowed from Eastenders, they never make us care as much as we should about the murdered men or the mystery relating to them. Again as with al these films I sense a undercurrent of suppressed homo-tendencies. Perhaps that's why there is a need to express this bottled up suppression in bouts of vilence.

Based on a memoir by former gang member and all-round hard case Carlton Leach. This is an unapologetic two hours that aims in vain for epic stature, tracing his career through three decades. Leach began as a West Ham-supporting soccer hooligan in the 1970s: the queasy violence between rival fans in its early scenes thus sustains another unlovable genre. Leach's progress, if that's the right word, involves a stint as a violent club bouncer (1980s), dalliances with various drugs and anabolic steroids, witnessing sundry murderous acts and eventually graduating to a real gang (1990's). In the large cast, women exist solely to be abused, slapped about or used as sexual playthings by these feral boy-men. And rightly so Beginning with Leach's experiences as a football hooligan, Rise Of The Footsoldier embarks on a visual assault comprising the most consistently violent images you will see on the big screen. Forget horror movies, this is real, visceral, eminently imitable violence of the sort which takes place on British streets every drunken weekend but which is, for the most part, blessedly hidden from the eyes of the public. It's an unrepentant attempt to shock the viewer into sitting up and taking notice, though in time it also has a numbing effect, which is, of course, entirely appropriate, because this is how it enables us to get into the mindset of its protagonists. As such, it is much more honest than most urban crime stories. Here even the most charming of villains are shown in full-on nastiness and there's no room for the illusion that they're really nice guys for whom we ought to feel sympathy because they love their dear old mums. When we start to identify with them anyway, this forces us to ask questions about ourselves.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 213 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Rise Of The Footsoldier - Single Disc Edition [2007] [DVD]
3.50
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews