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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Look No Further
It is traditional to expect performances of middle period - modernist Bartok - to carry exaggerated aggression and dissonance. There's no question that this music is highly dissonant and challenging but the aggression can get over played and this can skew our view of these works. These performances are indeed very polished but are certainly not detached or lacking in...
Published on 7 Jan. 2011 by Nobody

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Alone without feeling or beauty, together they thrive
I agree with the "third eye" guide that the solo violin sonata is played without feeling by Tetzlaff. For me, he doesn't reveal the beauty of III Melodia at all - contrast it with Pauk on Naxos, whose account of the Melodia is lovely and singing.

I've given three stars because the two performers work very well together on violin sonata 1, with Andsnes providing...
Published on 10 Mar. 2011 by William Shardlow


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Look No Further, 7 Jan. 2011
By 
Nobody "Alan Boyes" (Newcastle, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Bartok: Violin Sonatas (Audio CD)
It is traditional to expect performances of middle period - modernist Bartok - to carry exaggerated aggression and dissonance. There's no question that this music is highly dissonant and challenging but the aggression can get over played and this can skew our view of these works. These performances are indeed very polished but are certainly not detached or lacking in expression or dynamism when required.

The first sonata is radical indeed with the piano and violin playing almost independently of each other in the first movement. What this performance brings out however, is the violence and more the romantic and expressionistic. The first movement sounds passionate and exansive and the middle slow movement is contemplative and quite austere. The finale even with such an expanded tonality is essentially dance movement.

The second sonata is a llittle more equivocal and hints at the new neo clasical order that began to appear in the middle quartets and the first piano concerto. Both these sonatas stretch tonality to its limit but carry a key signature. The second feels like an ever so slight step back from the edge towards more traditional tonality.

That might be seen as the beginning of the journey that ended with the third piano concerto an dthe viola concerto. The sonata for solo violin dates from that period too but do not expect it to be a relaxation from the intensity of the two other sonatas. Based firmly as it is in tonality it is just as intense as the early works with a firm Bachian logic added to its form. This is a major work that all too often gets overlooked and is arguably the greatest work on this disc.

This is an excellent programme and the performances are technically superb - virtuoso on both instruments but never showy. As hinted earlier, they do not emphasise so much the aggression in these works but this is certainly not at the expense of sensitivity and expression. The two earlier sonatas, therefore sound less volcanic and more rounded works of art. Recorded sound is very clear and it is not difficult to see why this disc received rave critical reviews. There is serious bargain competition on Naxos but you can't go wrong with this version, especially as it is at a bargain reissue price too.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Alone without feeling or beauty, together they thrive, 10 Mar. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Bartok: Violin Sonatas (Audio CD)
I agree with the "third eye" guide that the solo violin sonata is played without feeling by Tetzlaff. For me, he doesn't reveal the beauty of III Melodia at all - contrast it with Pauk on Naxos, whose account of the Melodia is lovely and singing.

I've given three stars because the two performers work very well together on violin sonata 1, with Andsnes providing character, control and immaculate timing - Tetzlaff thrives on the partnership and a beautiful performance ensues. So worth buying for that alone. But if you are a bit disappointed by the solo performance, try Pauk.

P.S. Why is Andsnes's name smaller than Tetzlaff's on the cover?
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Bartok: Violin Sonatas
Bartok: Violin Sonatas by Christian Tetzlaff (Audio CD - 2008)
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