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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ratatouille
This was the best family film I saw all year in 2007. What seems at first a simple story about a rat who wants to cook, turns out in fact to be something more, deeper and more subtle. It was funny, charming, and also very touching. The animation was truly stunning and both my husband and children aged 5 and 8 loved it. Wonderful.
Published on 27 Dec 2007 by Mrs. J. Baker

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars disappointed with art cards
great film but not worth paying anything extra for art cards as they are poor quality
Published on 8 Oct 2009 by M. Saddique


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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ratatouille, 27 Dec 2007
By 
Mrs. J. Baker "Baker" (Sy) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This was the best family film I saw all year in 2007. What seems at first a simple story about a rat who wants to cook, turns out in fact to be something more, deeper and more subtle. It was funny, charming, and also very touching. The animation was truly stunning and both my husband and children aged 5 and 8 loved it. Wonderful.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Maximise your HDTV!, 15 Oct 2011
By 
T. Butcher (Kent, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ratatouille [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Whilst I shalln't go into a great deal of depth regarding the actual film (all other reviews have focused on this in great depth so please refer to those!) I'll simply tell you it's more of that Pixar brilliance you come to expect from the guys with the little lamp!

I wanted to focus on one tiny aspect of this Blu-Ray which very few have mentioned (perhaps they don't know it's there!) and that is the calibration tool provided on this disk! Now, for the technophobes out there when you receive your HDTV it's all shiny and nice and the picture quality is most probably good. But in order to get the very most out of your Blu-Ray films and HD Games you need to play around with some of the more in-depth settings in your TV's menu. This can be confusing if you've never done it before however included in the special features of this disk is an easy to follow guide on how to do this! Spend 5 minutes tweaking the settings as you're told to by the disk and your viewing experience (Visual & Audio) will be GREATLY improved!

I think that this alone is a great reason to buy this blu-ray as some calibration disks can cost crazy amounts! So at the very least rent this blu-ray!

Once again, great film but a brilliant little tool that will change the way you view all of your films!

If you have any questions add a comment to this review and I'll get back to you ASAP!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Film for the Whole Family, 11 Oct 2007
By 
M. A. Ramos (Florida USA) - See all my reviews
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Pixar and Disney have made a film that is truly visually appealing. In this movie we follow Remy the rat who has a unique nose for food. It is so sensitive that he can even detect when the food contains rat poison. His sense of smell leads him to a world of flavors and a love of great food. Though his family looks at any scraps as just energy to fuel the body, Remy has other ideas. So ignoring his father's advice he sets out to fulfill his dream of experiencing great food. Once he finds out he is actually living below Paris, he decides he must become a chef and fulfill his greater desire of creating great food. And it just so happens that he is living beneath the restaurant of his culinary hero, Augusted Gusteau. Remy quickly forms a bond with the garbage boy, Linguini. This leads to an adventure that has a story line that is worth watching. Like an old Disney movie we have a real storyline where we follow our little hero as he learns about what is important in life; family, friendship and striving to be the best you can at what ever you try. You also actually learn what it is like to work in the kicthen of a restaurant and the role that food critics play. This is a movie for those of all ages.
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and touching, 15 Feb 2008
I was less than enthusiastic when my husband brought this one home, but what a magical few hours it turned out to be. I adored this tale of Remy, his wonderful clan, acerbic father, genial, dotty brother and all. The human characters were equally as warmly portrayed, genuinely likeable. The villains had a touch of style, too. And there were many moments that had myself and my husband laughing out loud, some of them very subtle. (I loved the fact that the rats, when threatened, ran TO the boats, for example. A fun twist on rats leaving sinking ships!) I even cried at the happy ending. One we'll watch again. Treat yourselves!
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BUY BUY BUY !!!, 11 Feb 2008
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Buy this DVD. It is one you will watch again and again. For the cynics the story is predictable, but for the rest of us its how it gets there that matters. The detail is amazing, like one of the villains uses a somewhat rare French Facel Vega motor car. Perfect as a villains car. The romantic interest uses a powerful Motorbike. Perfect. The rest of the DVD and its detail almost brings the very smells of France, Paris and the food to life. I love the story, it plays well in these modern times,with modern villains. It might even get you to be inspired in the kitchen! Pixar and Disney have truly done it again.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delicious!, 9 April 2008
This review is from: Ratatouille [DVD] [2007] (DVD)
My husband & I saw this at the Cinema (without our children) and loved it! The story of Remy, the rat with a genius for cooking is fantastic. It moves along at a cracking pace using all the creative, high energy, visual effects that you would expect from PIXAR but without losing emotional connection. SPOILER Alert: The morality story of how this lowliest, most vilified of creatures has the talent and finds the spirit to climactically topple the opinion of society's most revered judge, the aptly named food critic Anton Ego (superbly voiced by the one and only Peter O'Toole - who undergoes his own journey of transformation) is wonderfully uplifting. As others have mentioned the sight of a kitchen crawling with rats is so uncomfortable, that it also makes you question your own prejudices, and whether you really believe that `Anyone can cook'. There is a wonderful extra on the DVD where Remy and his brother explain the bad press rats have had and how The Plague was not their fault...!

Then of course there is the sensory experience in the film. A lovely depiction of the sights, sounds and smells of Paris, the wonderful way Remy tries to explain flavour and fusion of flavours to his brother depicted by colour and music and not least, the food preparation itself. You can almost taste the soup and of course the fantastic ratatouille that Remy prepares at the end.

By the way a tip if like us, you have children under 10. They loved the DVD with the English-descriptive setting turned on (initially by accident, but hey!). This narrative fills in many of the visual cues that they would otherwise miss.

Lifted - the failed alien abduction was hilarious and is also included on the DVD along with loads of other fascinating extras.

Entertaining, taste-bud and thought-provoking stuff, top marks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Anyone Can Cook!", 24 Mar 2014
This review is from: Ratatouille [DVD] [2007] (DVD)
This review is for Sarah Sutton (Nyssa in `Doctor Who') who recommended this film as one of her favourites.

"In many ways, the work of a critic is easy." That's how Anton Ego began his review in the film, but I'm not going to write this the way he did it.

`Ratatouille' is a great film! I really enjoyed watching this over Christmas last year when I asked my parents for it upon recommendation. It's the eighth film produced by Disney/Pixar since 'Toy Story'. It's a really clever story and I would have to say is one of the most sophisticated films Pixar have made. A comedy that appeals to both children and adults. The film was written and directed by Brad Bird who previously directed 'The Incredibles' before this.

The film `Ratatouille' is set in Paris, France. It feels very French and makes you want to go there. The film has human characters and it also has rats. The story concerns one rat in particular called Remy (voiced by Patton Oswalt). Being a rat `means life is hard' for Remy. He has this highly acute sense of smell and prefers really good food instead of what rats normally - the garbage. Remy knows how to cook and wants to be a French chef in one of Paris' finest restaurants. He's a keen devotee of one of France's most famous chefs called Gusteau and follows his cookbook recipes. He speaks to Gusteau who appears as a figment of his imagination.

Remy has an older brother named Emile (voiced by Peter Sohn). Emile is a rat who loves eating and is easily impressed by his younger brother's sense of smell. He's surprised by what Remy can do. Remy can himself around Emile despite his brother not understanding him a lot of the time. I love the moments when Remy tries to teach Emile about how to eat good food and him not getting it. I also love it when the two get electrocuted from a chimney and they come out alive with a cheese-mushroom amalgamation with herbs that tastes `lightning-y' when they come it.

Remy also had a dad Django (voiced by Brian Dennehy). Remy's dad's not so easily impressed and only sees Remy's smelling skills in being `poison checker'. Remy and his dad don't see eye to eye. Remy prefers having good food whereas Remy's dad sees the bad stuff as a necessity. Remy's dad tries to tell Remy to stay away from, but Remy seems keen to learn from humans on how they cook and finds them fascinating despite his father's warnings.

Pretty soon, Remy and his large family get forced out of the house they're investing by the old lady who lives there and guns them down. Remy gets separated from his family down a sewage tunnel and is lost and alone. But he soon finds himself up to the top and ends up in Paris - the city of romance! Remy is overjoyed seeing the city at night and discovers the Gusteau's restaurant nearby. Remy's keen to see what's it like and is off to Gusteau's in an instant.

Inside the restaurant, Remy sees everything. He knows what goes on in the kitchen and knows every member of staff from the sous chef to the saucier and poissonnier to the garde manger. When he discovers a `garbage boy' messing up with the soup, Remy's is horrified and ends up accidentally falling in the kitchen. Remy can't resist making the soup himself, so he gets to work and a wonderful sequence ensues as he's adding herbs, vegetables and all sorts mixing it up to form a fully-flavoured concoction of the soup for the dinner guests. He has a good time before he gets caught by the garbage boy, who happens to be Linguini (voiced by Lou Romano). A critic who is provided the soup loves it, and the kitchen staff are convinced Linguini made the soup rather than rat.

Linguini is ordered to throw Remy the rat out, but he simply can't when Remy looks at him with sad eyes through the glass jar he's kept in. Linguini knows that Remy the rat cooked the soup, despite what everyone else thinks. He then realises that Remy can understand him when he's nodding his head. Linguini can't believe it he's actually talk to this rat. He think he's going crazy. He knows that he can't cook but that the rat can. Despite the rat being modest - `Look, don't be so modest! You're a rat, for Pete's sake!', he asks Remy who he calls his `little chef' to help him make the soup again. Remy agrees.

The two figure out how they can work together. Linguini then discovers that Remy can control his arms and legs when pulling his hair, controlling him like a puppet. I found it really funny when Remy controls Linguini pulling his hair and they practice cooking. Linguini's having to be blindfolded and I found myself laughing when he got it wrong with pouring wine over his head and on Remy the rat, smashing an omelette through a window and squirting a tomato into Remy's face. Eventually the two work as a team and cook the soup exactly as before. They're soon challenged to come up with new recipes.

The rest of the kitchen staff include Skinner (voiced by Sir Ian Holm) who takes over Gusteau's restaurant. Skinner's a little guy with a manic ego and is pretty hot-tempered. He's not so impressed by Linguini and suspects instantly that his cooking skills are connected with some rat he keeps under his toque (chef's hat). He tries to catch him out, but somehow Linguini manages to give the impression he doesn't keep a rat.

There's also Colette (voiced by Janeane Garofalo) who works in the kitchen. She's the rotisseur (in charge of the roasts) and the only female chef in Gusteau's kitchen. He's a tough young lady who's not to be intimidated. Colette teaches Linguini how to cook and advises him very sharply how to do it. But the two grow to like each other in the film and Colette is glad Linguini listens to her advice. The two soon end up falling in love with each other that I found very sweet and lovely to watch.

Gusteau's restaurant becomes threatened when a restaurant critic named Anton Ego (voiced by Peter O'Toole) returns. He discovers Gusteau's has become popular again and is determined to give a damning review on it. He doesn't care for Gusteau's and is pretty menacing when it comes to being a critic. If he `doesn't love' the food he's given, he `won't swallow'. Learning of Linguini's successes, he's determined to come to Gusteau's to have some `perspective' and find out what their food is like now. Can Linguini and his `little chef' be able to win Ego's approval and not get a damning critical review by him?

The reason why I think this film works so well is that it focuses on how we as people perceive food and tells us how we shouldn't take it for granted. It encourages us to see food in a new light in terms of taste and texture. Tasting one flavour of food like cheese, then trying out a strawberry and putting the cheese and strawberry together adds a whole new spin and flavour that's really invigorating. Knowing how good a loaf of bread is isn't by its crust or touch by its sound. Listen to the sound of bread when you put it to your ears. The film also emphasises how `anyone can cook' that's a recurring theme throughout this film. I've cooked my own Spaghetti Bolognese and watching this film has inspired me to appreciate how good food cooking is. I have in mind to create my own lasagne someday or even making an omelette.

The special features on this DVD include the following. There are two Pixar shorts. The first is `Lifted' - a hilarious story about aliens in a spaceship transporting his man out of his house which was shown before `Ratatouille' in cinemas. And the second is `Your Friend The Rat' starring Remy and Emile that's pretty funny where they try to convince audiences to be friends with rats. There's a documentary called `Fine Food & Film' that focuses on how Pixar worked with chefs to make a film about cooking and food with director Brad Bird and chef Thomas Keller. There's also some `deleted scenes' from this movie. Also there a 'sneak peaks' for other Disney films including a trailer for the next Pixar film 'Wall-E'.

I'm really pleased I've watched this Pixar animated film. It's a really good-feel film that makes me think of `Ratatouille' whenever I go to restaurants like Frank & Benny's and have my Spaghetti Bolognese. I heard at film and comic cons they have characters dressed up from `Ratatouille' which is interesting. It's a really popular film from Pixar and even though I don't go for animation films nowadays, I have to say `Ratatouille' is one of their finest and greatest. Really enjoyed it! I'm sure you will too!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great family film, 4 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Ratatouille [DVD] [2007] (DVD)
This film is a firm family favourite. The DVD was well packaged and was dispatched and posted very quickly. I would recommend this to anyone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars disappointed with art cards, 8 Oct 2009
By 
M. Saddique (oxford, u.k.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
great film but not worth paying anything extra for art cards as they are poor quality
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Attention all Epicures!, 25 July 2009
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This review is from: Ratatouille [DVD] [2007] (DVD)
My husband and I love good food (the food prepared by the professionals, of course, but we also love to cook), good wine, and lazy evenings at home watching good movies. If you do, too, then Ratatouille is for you. We wish that we could afford the wines mentioned in the film (they range from $2000 to $20,000), and the "Remy Method" of making ratatouille (layering the vegetables, covering them with sauce and baking them; I use a dutch oven) yields excellent results.

Oh, and the story itself is charming, the animation is wonderful, and all the characters have clear motivations without sacrificing personal depth. Yes, it is a G-rated movie, but that does not stop it from being nuanced and multi-layered, not to mention entertaining. I recommend it with a 2000 Medoc.
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