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33
4.2 out of 5 stars
The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones, Volume 1 [DVD](1992)
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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on 29 February 2008
Let's admit it. If you're looking for the Indy of "Raiders", you might get sorely disappointed. This one's intended for the whole family and a lot more kid-friendly than Harrison Ford's outings. If you cringed at seeing the young Anakin Skywalker, chance is you might not like the 9-year old Indy.

However, there's plenty of thrills, chills and action in this show, though on a subtler scale than with previous versions of Indiana Jones. This Indy engages in adventures with an emphasis on and appreciation of history, culture and the arts. It's clear that these episodes are meant to be educational, but this is not a bad thing, on the contrary. Following Indy as he travels the world with his parents, and then later - on his own, gives young Indy an exciting and cross-cultural backdrop.

Each installment comes with a truckload of excellent documentaries about the people and places Indy encounters in the adventure you've just seen. These aren't dumbed down for kids docus, but more along the lines of what you'd see on National Geographic or Discovery, and they're all very engaging and informative. I tend to watch the documentaries for each episode first, to get a full appreciation of the ensuing adventure. And I have to say - I've learned a lot.

The production values and attention to detail is a sight to behold, and sometimes you wonder how they did it all on a mere tv budget. The acting is decent, and Lloyd Owen does a pretty spot-on incarnation of a younger Henry Jones Sr. (Indy's father). Every time he says "Junior", I'm sure I'm hearing Sean Connery.

Most of the episodes in this volume revolves around Indy aged 9 or thereabouts. In the last three shows, Flanery takes over the reins and portrays a 20-year old Indy. From here on, the action, pace and tenseness picks up and becomes more adult.

For those who saw the original broadcast versions of the show, you'll probably notice that all the scenes with old Indy (George Hall) has been cut. Initially I was saddened to see these go, but as these dvd's present Indy's adventures in a chronological order, it makes sense the way they've done it. As a result of the new edit however, some episodes, notably the first "My first Adventure", ends somewhat abruptly and unresolved. Hopefully the conclusion to this adventure is presented in volume 2 or 3, as the original version had Flanery completing this storyline.

Although this is quite an expensive set, at least at the moment, I have to say it is still the best value for money I have ever spent on a dvd. The packaging itself is very nice and made to look like Indy's own diary, as featured in the series. Though there doesn't seem to be any extras chronicling the production of the actual show or commentaries, the hours of great documentaries coupled with Indiana Jones' adventures, albeit a young Indiana Jones, fills me with glee everytime I put it on, even as an adult.

If you don't like the idea of Indy as a kid, skip this one and wait for Indy IV.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
I won't bother reviewing the series, as this has already been done. What I will say is that having spent so much time and effort on restoration and filming the 90 odd documentaries that accompany the series, it's a great pity they didn't include booklets with comprehensive disc contents, and cast/director commentaries etc. I'm also not terribly happy that George Lucas has tinkered with the episodes (god can't he leave anything alone!!!) and completely edited out all the wonderful scenes featuring George Hall as the 90 year old Indiana. George Hall's scenes were amongst the most poignant in each episode - so big mistake Mr Lucas, and I know I'm not alone in thinking that. However, £100 for 22 feature length adventures and 90+ documentaries spread over 31 discs is a real bargain.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 3 December 2008
I had been waiting for the DVD set of this for years to replace my vastly incomplete recordings from the TV as well as fill in some gaps. I fought the temptation to fire off a review after watching one disc and have instead waded my through it all.

Initially I was a little dismayed by the composite nature of the episodes: the conjoining of two episodes to make one 'film'. Coupled with that is the removal of Old Indy, it did not bode well. Previously I had thought either a strict chronological ordering of the individual episodes would have worked best. However, I can see Mr Lucas' reasons - it does cut down on the volume of opening/closing credits. The other way might have been to simply order the episodes as they had been aired. This might have ironed out the `Curse of the Jackal' gripe that other reviewers have noticed. As to Old Indy, for this first volume, I haven't missed him. But, I'm not sure how volume two will pan out: I remember, for example, in 'Petrograd July 1917' Old Indy's part is exceptionally good and if not crucial, certainly adds some tremendous gravitas.

As to the production, I do not find the inconsistencies in the actors' ages in the intermediate spliced sections that connect the original pairs of episodes annoying. To my mind, there is a charming ingenuousness here that leaves me feeling "well, good for you for trying to do this". It also helps indentify which sections have been added.

Volume one was always going to be the weaker draw compared to the second. Let's face it, Indy the Youth is far more interesting than Indy the Kid, who I had always found annoying. But I retract that having watched these volumes. Corey Carrier and S.P. Flanery do a fair job of consistency in mannerism - they both have the same shrug and puzzled, doubtful air. I sometimes do find the whole Scottish thing for Indy's father bizarre, though marvel at how the choice of Sean Connery in one feature film has dictated the whole direction of the series. In 'London, May 1917' Indy and Elizabeth Hurley vie with each other in a linguistic competition which Hurley wins with Welsh, saying how can someone with the name of `Jones' not know Welsh. How indeed? And how many Scotsmen have the surname Jones? However, Lloyd Owen is fine in this role, and for me the most enjoyable episode is the Greek one, where we get to see more of Owen as well as indulging a picaresque adventure in the sultry Greek countryside. The acting is a bit hammy, but it doesn't detract; even the clothes-eating goats which look suspiciously like sheep are acceptable if one suspends one's disbelief.

With regards to the extras, these have been done fairly well; that was until I got to 'Black Jack Pershing' - selective history to say the least. I appreciate that time is short, but why not mention his role with leading Afro-American troops (the bowdlerized origin of his nickname) and his participation in two of the U.S. Army's less worthy 'victories' of Wounded Knee (1890) and the Moro Crater Massacre (1906)? A bit more balance is needed. Likewise with the Irish Rebellion: looking at the list of contributors we doubt that we are in for an impartial account of what was a fascinating and important historical incident. Watch the extras but keep a pinch of salt near at hand.

Overall, a delightful series whose weaknesses are far outweighed by the positive things. I look forward to showing these to my sons (when they're a little older). The value of the educational aspect is that it gives viewers enough information to go off and do their own research if they wish. It deserves to endure and finally get the recognition that has so far eluded it.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 11 March 2008
Firstly I would like to post information that I initially found hard to find.

While watching the first episode ('My First Adventure') I found the end of the 'Curse of the Jackal' storyline very abrupt and did not have a resolution. I then read on the internet that this pilot initially aired with a 2nd part starring Sean Patrick Flanery and finished the story....but, everything I was reading was indicating that this part was not in this set.

They were wrong!

Yes, it's annoying that they cut the episode in 2; but the conclusion to the Curse of the Jackal is actually in 'Spring Break Adventure' (it's the second half of that episode).

Other than the strange decision to split this episode in two; which results in the young Indy (Corey Carrier) aging between episodes the rest of this box set has been exemplary.

I usually pick and choose what extras to watch on a DVD, but with this set I have been watching absolutely everything.
Unlike an earlier reviewer I watch the episode first and then the documentaries (mainly so that the liberties taken in the episode don't annoy me) and have found all the doc's to be very well done and packed full of information.

I can't wait for the 2nd release in this series - especially as we in the UK are getting this set so much cheaper than our friends in the USA.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 11 March 2009
I was not much of a fan of the "Young Indiana Jones Chronicles" as a child but the release of the fourth movie last year reignited my interest in the series so I rented out these DVDs from my local blockbuster.

I have to say I really enjoyed these stories. Although at times they substitute talkiness for adventure, young Indy's encounters with famous historical figures are laced with enough intrigue and action to hook both kids and adults. He encounters all kinds of figures in the fields of the arts, sciences and politics so really there is something in here for everyone.

I really liked his sojourns in Vienna, where he sneaks into a castle after taking advice on love from Freud. Even better are his adult adventures first in Mexico, then in Ireland and England. The sense of time and place is captured very well and each of the famous people Indy meets are incorporated plausibly into his story.

The documentaries that accompany each adventure are also worth looking at, adding greater depth to the action in the series.
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on 3 December 2012
I'm really happy with the quality of this pack and don't regret the purchase at all.
A must have for every Indiana Jones fan.
The first pack (volume 1) is about 1.5 times the size of the others (volume 2 & 3) - in thickness, the general measures are the same.
It's a nice glossy outer box carton (unfortunately a bit spoiled with age restriction stickers). The retrievable foldable disk container is made to resemble a book. It unfolds to give way to the DVDs.

I don't like the disk holder system that is being used in volume 1 and 3 so much. You have to push the disk sideways into a groove against a spring that then presses it upwards underneath two little pins to keep the disk in place. This mechanism is prone to scratch the discs over time. I prefer the standard system of the central clip that is used in volume 2.

The DVDs are region 2.
The picture ratio is 4:3.
The quality is DVD typical. With a software player you can get slightly increased quality with HD simulation, but nothing comparable to real HD - a pity that this probably is as good as it gets, for this series most likely won't ever come to blu-ray.
The films have been revised - I think - to offer the best quality that was derivable from the TV-material (without to much costly efforts - this time George Lucas could have let of some steam and go wild on this material to carry it over to HD). But this TV-series, on the other hand, relies more on the story anyways, much more than on scenery and picture quality.

Audio and Subtitles are English only.
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This review is a combined one for all three seasons of Young Indiana.

I remembered watching some of these as a youth. They sparked a free-spirited ambition in a lot of boys and girls of the era I'm sure. When I saw them on offer at amazon I figured I'd snap them all up to re-live some of my past, being an Indie fan anyway.

Turns out, I'd probably not seen over 50% of the full series as I couldn't remember a lot of it.

Season one sees Indie (Henry Junior) as a boy, played by Cory Carrier, who never really seemed to carry on in acting. His father was talently played by Lloyd Owen who sounds the spit of Sean Connery's depiction in the earlier feature-films, which really helped with the feeling of continuity. Margaret Tyzack rounds out the key characters from my opinion, playing the part of Indie's tutor, Miss Seymour. I don't feel Indie's mother was much of a character and was incidental to most of the series.

During the season, you see him being the insolent youth you expect, perhaps rather big-headed and overly arrogant in his portrayal (perhaps reasons why Cory didn't go on to much more?). They travel from place to place, meeting various important and note-worthy people from that era.

As you enter season 2, Indie quickly ages into the dashing figure of Sean Patrick Flanery, and we see his portrayal through "The War Years" where he progresses up through the ranks in the Belgian Army with his pal Remy. Again, various note-worthy occasions, and the odd dash of archeology, but mostly it's his cheeky mis-adventures through the era that endears. I would say this is my favourite season and contains the episodes that I recalled from my youth.

Finally, we come to season 3 where Indie eventually comes out of the War, yet seems to regress into the shadow of his former pre-war life, struggling to get to grips with a stable career. I half-expected this season to be all about the archeology, but it kind of skits round that point. [spoiler alert!] Remy gets swept aside relatively suddenly like some old sock, and various episodes of this season come across as a bit slap-stick and rather un-fitting of the series as a whole. A bit disappointing really.

On the whole, I really did enjoy the series, although as I have mentioned, it perhaps didn't quite go down the road of archeological exploration that I was perhaps hoping for, and that was certainly encouraged in the first season.

One thing that certainly is a boon in this series on DVD is the wide selection of well-shot documentaries that cover the themes at the time. These are all well worth viewing, and help to lend an educational arm to the series to help you learn a bit more about how some of the stories came to being.
The series has been editted about so that episode merge in the right places to form decent length viewings, and it is all done in a relatively seamless fashion.

Despite it's failings, I would still rate the whole series 5-stars at the price I got it for on amazon (about £9 per season at time of purchase). If you end up paying more, I'd probably drop the rating down to 4-stars, and considering that the current price on amazon is around the £18-19 mark, I'll let it sit at 4 for now.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 9 March 2014
Teach me to not be sexist! I bought the collection for our son who loved the adult Indy films but he barely glanced at them. Our daughter has taken them over. Entertaining, tongue in cheek as to history.
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on 6 June 2011
They've done a brilliant job with the whole series. It's both entertaining and very interesting watching young Indy as he, often quite by chance, stumbles into important historical moments with some of the most famous and influential people in early 20th century history.

Each episode is of movie length and movie quality, and not only that, the extra features are both very well done and very interesting. I would never have thought I'd "waste" my time learning anything about opera, ballet and french impressionism, cubism and other artforms, but the episodes along with the extras really sparked an interest for those subjects, and while I'm unlikely to fill up my home with Picasso's paintings, I'll by certain to visit the Louvre next time I'm in Paris and just maybe I'll be able to appreciate it as well.

I really can't say enough good things about this. It's great for children and adults alike and you cannot watch this series without learning something, and that's a rare things nowadays with all the mindless rubbish Hollywood seems to think we want.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 20 January 2008
I always wondered what Indiana did with his life between leaving the boy scouts and becoming an adventurous academic. Well, in the days well before teenage options of hanging out at the mall and collecting Star Wars figures (geek) there were surprisingly plentiful opportunities to travel the world, fight in global conflicts, meet the personalities of the day and expend enormous amounts of money with virtually no parental supervision. A swashbuckling series of adventures with cameo appearances from current stars of screen and stage as varied as Daniel Craig, Christopher Lee, a very young looking Liz Hurley and a belly dancing Catherine Zeta Jones. A very grown up adventure but good family viewing altogether.
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