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13 Reviews
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kano's NO one hit wonder
London Town is a brilliant follow up, with heavy hitting basslines and Kano's amazing flow this album is definitely one to get. You can hear the growth in Kano as an artist production is tighter and the album just seems more soild when compeared to 'Home Sweet Home'. I must admit when I first saw only 11 tracks I was dissapointed I thought I'ld be left wanting more. But...
Published on 11 Sep 2007 by Tasha Marie C

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Disapointing Second Album?
I brought this album purely on the strength of Kano's first album Home Sweet Home, which in short blew me away.

After hearing the Craig David collaberation This Is The Girl i thought it would easily keep to my high expectations, but on first listen i was hugely disapointed. No tracks really stood out to me, even the more main stream collaberations with Damien...
Published on 1 May 2008 by Ms. Beth E. Marchant


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kano's NO one hit wonder, 11 Sep 2007
This review is from: London Town [Limited Edition] (Audio CD)
London Town is a brilliant follow up, with heavy hitting basslines and Kano's amazing flow this album is definitely one to get. You can hear the growth in Kano as an artist production is tighter and the album just seems more soild when compeared to 'Home Sweet Home'. I must admit when I first saw only 11 tracks I was dissapointed I thought I'ld be left wanting more. But as soon as I put the CD on it didn't matter I listened from start to finish and was left feelling satisfied there are NO 'fillers'. If you liked the first album you'll love this, add it to the basket now!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great follow up to home sweet home, 11 Sep 2007
after loving kanos first album home sweet home i decided to pre order london town also based on the strength of 'this is the girl'. i certainly was not dissapointed after listening the album through. the album boasts a wide range of different genre influenced tracks and thats what makes this album special. i am by no means a great fan of grime or garage but do keep an eye open for a good artist and kano is a great artist. each track is a good listen with highlights being 'this is the girl' 'sleep tight' 'london town' 'bad boy'. whilst listening to fighting the nation though it was one track where i just though what the hell is he doing? an accoustic attempt on a grime album? 1st listen i was not impressed but after a couple chances and listening more closely to lyrics i could understand the track and even began to love it. all in all there are no weak songs on this album and it is very close to rivaling home sweet home... i cant quite decide which is better yet.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars London Town, 18 Sep 2007
By 
connor james "C.J.D" (stockport manchester uk) - See all my reviews
this is a brilliant second attempt by kano. when home sweet home ended up being so amazingly good , i doubted that he could match it a second time around. I was rite. because this isnt as good as HSH but theres still no doubting the quality of this album and it is much better than the "flop" some people are calling it. just dont compare it to HSH and youll love it. overall its a brilliant deep , much darker album , and lyrically superior to its brother. overall a very good album.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So proud, 16 Sep 2007
By 
A. Keshi "SofistaFunK" (London,England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: London Town [Limited Edition] (Audio CD)
Im so Proud of Kano and to be a Londoner. Its about time we give some of these Americans a run for their money. This album is GREAT! That's all I can say. Kano is a marvelous lyricist and a cheeky one, well rounded album. Skip to:
Feel Free
Bad Boy
The Product
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Kano -London Town Review (3.5 stars_, 5 Sep 2007
This review is from: London Town [Limited Edition] (Audio CD)
London Town is the second album to be dropped by UK rapper, Kano. Kano has been busy since 2005's successful 100'000+ selling `Home Sweet Home' album which showcased the 20 year old's ability to appeal to a wide demographic. A mixtape released last year entitled `Beats and Bars' satisfied the man dem with its street orientated subject matter but suffered from the Achilles heel of most mixtapes, namely, under production and an excessive number of tracks. `London Town' out on 679 Recordings showcases a confident rapper who has learnt from experiences within the industry and has varied his lyrical content and musical style.

As one enters the album, they are greeted by a future street anthem, `Product'. A murky bubbling synth starts proceedings, and is then joined by short bursts of sharp snares. As Kano narrates slowly saying "one body, two body, three body, four, five more soliders dead on the floor", one can immediately tell this track is going to suck the listener in to the shadowy depths of Kano's cerebral. The track kicks off with a smatter of snares and is joined by an understated beat and Kano's rapid fire delivery. A simple, dark and heavily processed melody meanders through the track adding a sense of grandeur. In this track, Kano engages the listener with his most successful style, i.e. playing with the tempo of his lyrical delivery as the track progresses. This track is a brilliantly produced opener which stylistically echoes the `davinche' produced tracks from `Home Sweet Home'. Following that is the track most people have already heard, `London Town'. It is another well produced stormer which follows on perfectly from the opener. A simple kick-drum and snare exercise is joined by dark intermittent releases of bass drone whilst Kano raps competently in a steady fashion. Although the chorus isn't the most imaginative, the multi-dimensional beat progresses nicely with some fresh stylistic edges, and features some exemplary examples of `beat riding' by Kano.

Following `London Town', is the previously released banger featuring the lanky Ragga legend, Vybz Kartel. I know mans ears pricked up when Westwood announced the collaboration between these two `kings of industry' and the track immediately received good vibes from both sides of the Atlantic. Recorded in Jamaica and released earlier this year on vinyl only, one can tell from the title `Buss it Up', that it is not going to be a big player on daytime radio. Instrumentally we are treated to a high tempo `grimey-fied' military dancehall beat with occasional melodic beeps of traditional Jamaican instruments and a paranoia inducing, warping bass effect underpinning the track. Lyrically, Vybz is on fire, spitting rapid fire and freakily conservative Patois. The intertwining of Kano and Vybz in the chorus works splendidly and Kano holds up his end of the track with some break-neck beat riding which requires repeated listens. Track 4 `Badboy' continues the trend of beefy production values and rapid fire lyrical delivery but this time it is delivered in a slower (yet very fresh) R'n'B fashion with a slight Rasta tinge. So far, 4 tracks have dropped and each track has showcased top production (courtesy of Mikey J and Fraser Smith), fresh and unique beats and excellent lyrical delivery. Can this continue through the rest of the album?

Well, inevitably the answer is NO. `Fighting the Nation' is the next up. When Plan B did an acoustic grime track it made many sit up and listen. This attempts a similar formula but it ends up being a slightly feeble acoustic affair however it succeeds in sending out an important social message. Track 6 `Feel Free' featuring Damon Albarn bucks the downward slope and fully showcases Kano's transformation from street rapper to full blown alt.mainstream act. Contrary to what some may say, this is a fresh, multi-dimensional and ultimately, successful track with Kano's exercising his sharp lyrical delivery over dark oscillating beats garnished with twinkly piano keys and phaser FX. This the kind of track you'd expect to hear on BBC Radio 1 in the early evening after the pop music has been exhausted and before the specialist genre's are explored.

As the album progresses, things start to stutter and warning signs start to expose themselves. Track 7 `Sleep Tight' features a cinematic piano laden soundscape with sharp skittering snares and vocal harmonies which sounds pretty damn cool. There is a `hard to create' reminiscent feeling about this track but as Kano gently whispers "Sleep Tight don't let the bed bugs bite" one starts to think who this album is really aimed at. It's a shame because the verses contain some excellent wordplay and energetic deilivery. One can forsee the comic event of bad boys leaping for the volume control as the chorus kicks in. Failure to reach the volume knob would certainly would tarnish the reputation of any bad man bussin it on their ipod speakers or their Alpine subs.

The introduction of Craig David and Kate Nash results in glossy, mainstream orientated, hit and miss affairs which will appeal to more casual listeners. Track 10 `Over and Over' is a subtley crafted, intelligent piece which stands out as you reach the tail end of 'London Town'. It is a brooding, dark and grimey urban lullaby featuring a skeletal beat and fluctuating synth melody with Kano rapping about past and future in a way that draws the listener in to his world.

On this album Kano (refreshingly) doesn't rap about situations above his station. You can tell that the lyrical content is about issues that he has personally been involved in or has witnessed. Ultimately `London Town' is somewhat of a conundrum, albeit a slickly produced one. There are dark and grimey gangster tracks which draw inspiration from the best of the eski-beat explosion, there are intelligent and varied exercises in instrumentation, and then there are pop-tastic and drawn out crooning numbers. I can't imagine many people will be feeling the whole range of styles covered on `London Town' and hence, it can ultimately be classed as a hit and miss affair, but with more hits than misses.
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5.0 out of 5 stars very happy, 20 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
after damaging the copy that I have I thought to myself 'amazon must be the best place to replace the cd that I like so much' great price and in quality condition ...
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3.0 out of 5 stars Disapointing Second Album?, 1 May 2008
By 
I brought this album purely on the strength of Kano's first album Home Sweet Home, which in short blew me away.

After hearing the Craig David collaberation This Is The Girl i thought it would easily keep to my high expectations, but on first listen i was hugely disapointed. No tracks really stood out to me, even the more main stream collaberations with Damien Albarn and Kate Nash. It wasn't until i accidently stumbled across it again on shuffle mode a few weeks later that i really started to enjoy the album.

Stand out tracks for me include, This Is The Girl, Me & My Microphone and Fightin' The Nation.

Overall i would only give this album 3-Stars because of its slow start. If you buy this album trust me, (eventually) you won't be disapointed! ;)
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5.0 out of 5 stars UK'S BEST, 19 Mar 2008
Im keeping this short cause im in a rush but this is a great album by a Great mc thats all there is to it
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5.0 out of 5 stars Kano - London Town, 1 Nov 2007
By 
C. Allen (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: London Town [Limited Edition] (Audio CD)
Once again representing the finest of UK talent.
Kano's gone and done it again. Fantastic 2nd album.
Whether it be the club bangers Buss It Up & Bad Boy (which is probably my favourite uk track of the year!), the Gorillaz inspired Feel Free, the accoustic Fightin' The Nation, the commercial success of This Is The Girl, or the grimefest of the bonus hidden track, this album is brillantly varied, but packaged together with Kano's trademark sound.
Worth every penny, bring on album number 3!
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Kano- London Town review (3.5 stars), 5 Sep 2007
London Town is the second album to be dropped by UK rapper, Kano. Kano has been busy since 2005's successful 100'000+ selling `Home Sweet Home' album which showcased the 20 year old's ability to appeal to a wide demographic. A mixtape released last year entitled `Beats and Bars' satisfied the man dem with its street orientated subject matter but suffered from the Achilles heel of most mixtapes, namely, under production and an excessive number of tracks. `London Town' out on 679 Recordings showcases a confident rapper who has learnt from experiences within the industry and has varied his lyrical content and musical style.

As one enters the album, they are greeted by a future street anthem, `Product'. A murky bubbling synth starts proceedings, and is then joined by short bursts of sharp snares. As Kano narrates slowly saying "one body, two body, three body, four, five more soliders dead on the floor", one can immediately tell this track is going to suck the listener in to the shadowy depths of Kano's cerebral. The track kicks off with a smatter of snares and is joined by an understated beat and Kano's rapid fire delivery. A simple, dark and heavily processed melody meanders through the track adding a sense of grandeur. In this track, Kano engages the listener with his most successful style, i.e. playing with the tempo of his lyrical delivery as the track progresses. This track is a brilliantly produced opener which stylistically echoes the `davinche' produced tracks from `Home Sweet Home'. Following that is the track most people have already heard, `London Town'. It is another well produced stormer which follows on perfectly from the opener. A simple kick-drum and snare exercise is joined by dark intermittent releases of bass drone whilst Kano raps competently in a steady fashion. Although the chorus isn't the most imaginative, the multi-dimensional beat progresses nicely with some fresh stylistic edges, and features some exemplary examples of `beat riding' by Kano.

Following `London Town', is the previously released banger featuring the lanky Ragga legend, Vybz Kartel. I know mans ears pricked up when Westwood announced the collaboration between these two `kings of industry' and the track immediately received good vibes from both sides of the Atlantic. Recorded in Jamaica and released earlier this year on vinyl only, one can tell from the title `Buss it Up', that it is not going to be a big player on daytime radio. Instrumentally we are treated to a high tempo `grimey-fied' military dancehall beat with occasional melodic beeps of traditional Jamaican instruments and a paranoia inducing, warping bass effect underpinning the track. Lyrically, Vybz is on fire, spitting rapid fire and freakily conservative Patois. The intertwining of Kano and Vybz in the chorus works splendidly and Kano holds up his end of the track with some break-neck beat riding which requires repeated listens. Track 4 `Badboy' continues the trend of beefy production values and rapid fire lyrical delivery but this time it is delivered in a slower (yet very fresh) R'n'B fashion with a slight Rasta tinge. So far, 4 tracks have dropped and each track has showcased top production (courtesy of Mikey J and Fraser Smith), fresh and unique beats and excellent lyrical delivery. Can this continue through the rest of the album?

Well, inevitably the answer is NO. `Fighting the Nation' is the next up. When Plan B did an acoustic grime track it made many sit up and listen. This attempts a similar formula but it ends up being a slightly feeble acoustic affair however it succeeds in sending out an important social message. Track 6 `Feel Free' featuring Damon Albarn bucks the downward slope and fully showcases Kano's transformation from street rapper to full blown alt.mainstream act. Contrary to what some may say, this is a fresh, multi-dimensional and ultimately, successful track with Kano's exercising his sharp lyrical delivery over dark oscillating beats garnished with twinkly piano keys and phaser FX. This the kind of track you'd expect to hear on BBC Radio 1 in the early evening after the pop music has been exhausted and before the specialist genre's are explored.

As the album progresses, things start to stutter and warning signs start to expose themselves. Track 7 `Sleep Tight' features a cinematic piano laden soundscape with sharp skittering snares and vocal harmonies which sounds pretty damn cool. There is a `hard to create' reminiscent feeling about this track but as Kano gently whispers "Sleep Tight don't let the bed bugs bite" one starts to think who this album is really aimed at. It's a shame because the verses contain some excellent wordplay and energetic deilivery. One can forsee the comic event of bad boys leaping for the volume control as the chorus kicks in. Failure to reach the volume knob would certainly would tarnish the reputation of any bad man bussin it on their ipod speakers or their Alpine subs.

The introduction of Craig David and Kate Nash results in glossy, mainstream orientated, hit and miss affairs which will appeal to more casual listeners. Track 10 `Over and Over' is a subtley crafted, intelligent piece which stands out as you reach the tail end of 'London Town'. It is a brooding, dark and grimey urban lullaby featuring a skeletal beat and fluctuating synth melody with Kano rapping about past and future in a way that draws the listener in to his world.

On this album Kano (refreshingly) doesn't rap about situations above his station. You can tell that the lyrical content is about issues that he has personally been involved in or has witnessed. Ultimately `London Town' is somewhat of a conundrum, albeit a slickly produced one. There are dark and grimey gangster tracks which draw inspiration from the best of the eski-beat explosion, there are intelligent and varied exercises in instrumentation, and then there are pop-tastic and drawn out crooning numbers. I can't imagine many people will be feeling the whole range of styles covered on `London Town' and hence, it can ultimately be classed as a hit and miss affair, but with more hits than misses.
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London Town [Limited Edition]
London Town [Limited Edition] by Kano (Audio CD - 2007)
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