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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Hell that was Gallipoli
****DOES CONTAIN SPOILERS****

"Gallipoli" made in 1981 is an Australian film directed by Peter Weir and starring Mel Gibson and Mark Lee, all natives of that country. The film is set during the First World War and the title refers to the peninsula of the same name located on the Aegean coast of The Dardenelles in Turkey. It was in this area that between the...
Published on 25 Feb 2009 by Bob Salter

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ok
making people write long reviews on ggod they receive is in my opinion expecting a lot. surely just a simple word comment is enough??
Published 17 months ago by Ms. Julie A. Renyard


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anti War, 29 Nov 2011
This review is from: Gallipoli - Collectors Edition (1982) [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
One of the best Anti War films of the 20th century, it shows the futility of war and how Australia and New Zealand lost a whole generation of young men due to the stupidity of politicians, the majority of those young men did not know what they were fighting for across the other side of the world.A Great film.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Watch this film, 8 Sep 2011
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This review is from: Gallipoli - Collectors Edition (1982) [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
I first saw this film 15 years ago and thought that I had glorified it in my mind..... not so. It is a wonderful but tragic tale of coming of age during World War 1 and being faced with the brutal reality of wartime during the Australian Turkish conflict at Gallipoli. The concept of 'fate' has never been so tenderly and agonisingly explored. Gibson and Lee are not only in their physical prime, but also give 2 outstanding performances in the lead roles. This is Weir at his best.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The tragedy of war., 6 Aug 2011
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This review is from: Gallipoli - Collectors Edition (1982) [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
Peter Wier's Gallipoli (1981) is visually stunning and deeply moving. A simple story of 'modern' warfare that was as brutal and wasteful of young lives as any medieval battle. The commanding officers watching through binoculars from a safe distance as their men are mowed down like flies before the enemy guns, while the young brave boys piss in their pants with fear, write last poignant letters to their mums and girlfriends before obeying the reluctantly given order to go over the top of the trench to certain death, was almost too painful and realistic to watch. Mel Brooks was so young when he made this (23 I think) that he is barely recognisable but he and Mark Lee were pitch perfect. A superb tribute to a horrendous battle.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Gallipoli, 29 Oct 2010
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Sandra J. Lee (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gallipoli [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
The DVD arrived promptly but it stick most of the way through, but I managed to see what I wanted
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seriously moving, 3 Dec 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Gallipoli [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
This 1980 film maps the friendship of two Australian men and how they came to face the true massacre in Gallipoli during the first world war. Although it does dip into movie-style sentimentality at times, it is well worth watching.It always makes me cry.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 3 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Gallipoli - Collectors Edition (1982) [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
Disjointed, very little of Gallipoli itself, and appears to have been shot in a totally different location. It just doesn't relate to the muddy, ghastly Gallipoli of reality.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A SPECTACLE, 20 Jan 2006
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This review is from: Gallipoli [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
Gallipoli is a great film of war, peace and friendship. It tells the story of two Australian soldiers who get butchered in the Trenches on the hills that are overlooking the beaches of Gallipoli.
Beautifully shot Gallipoli is a film that should be seen and seen again.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good visuals, but follows a well-trodden track, 14 Feb 2010
By 
Humpty Dumpty (Wall St, Upton Snodsbury) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gallipoli - Collectors Edition (1982) [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
Peter Weir's approach to filming the Gallipoli landings and campaign, the memory of which resounds to this day particularly in Australia and NZ, is an idiosyncratic one in that we don't arrive in Turkey until well after an hour's running time. Weir's good idea of focusing on the experiences of two young men, contrasting characters but still friends, means however that much time is devoted to introducing them and the background they come from before they even join up, let alone witness their first bullet fired in anger.

This long preamble would be more successful were the pair shown to be compellingly interesting. As it is, we have a fresh-faced, naive amateur sprinter, engagingly played by the debutant Mark Lee, who is contrasted with the more worldly-wise, if not cynical Mel Gibson, putting in a characteristically blank, even unattractive performance. Their hesitations and false starts proceed in a leisurely manner until away they go with a group of undifferentiated friends and acquaintances to Cairo. Here chapter 2 is signalled and then limps along as they drill and exercise in the shadow of the Pyramids; all very charming, but adding up to little more than a series of Thomas Cook picture postcards.

So far so pedestrian, but now at long last Weir finds a burst of energy as he tackles a vignette from the campaign which has to serve as representing the whole eight months of fighting. Fair enough, and these trench scenes are well-mounted and carefully filmed. But the sequence follows an all-too-familiar pattern - camaraderie struggling to overcome the perils of blind generals, dud communications and the deadly machine gun - and I looked in vain for some new insight or point of view; nor do the sonorous tones of Mahler's 5th Symphony and Albinoni's Adagio help to dispel the sense of deja vu.

So we are left with a movie of great visual beauty, whether we're in the sweltering outback, beneath the Sphinx looming up beyond the last dwellings of Giza, or looking down on the swarming Gallipoli beaches. And the freeze-frame final shot encapsulating the waste of war in a stunning image leaves you with a real jolt. But the look of the film, despite being served by a pin-sharp picture quality in this release is, like patriotism, not enough.

The extras consist of a series of Making Of featurettes that make up a feature of c. 1 hour. You get tantalising glimpses of sepia photos and diary entries from the period, but alas the rest adds up to cast and crew telling us what fun they had making the film and how well they did it.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful film, 3 Dec 2005
By 
M. Jeffery "mark41782" (Surrey, England, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gallipoli [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
I watched this film years ago when it was shown late one night on TV and I was blown away, I ended up crying at the end - not something I usually do at films. I can't stand Mel Gibson but I have to say this performance is outstanding, and the music, well I hate classical/opera, but Adagio in G minor and Au Fond du Temple Saint from The Pearl Fishers did it for me but Jean Michel Jarre! What was Peter Weir thinking!
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unconvincing, 31 Aug 2010
By 
Mr. H. D. Perry "Above us only sky" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Gallipoli - Collectors Edition (1982) [DVD] [1981] (DVD)
Having recently visited the Gallipoli peninsular I was looking forward to filling out my understanding of the doomed invasion. Unfortunately the film concerns itself less with the historical context and the facts of the battles than with the individual Australian soldier's experience of being sent to an exotic part of the world without thinking very much about the whys and wherefores.

Too much time is spent on the life of lads in the Australia of the time and their escapades while training in Egypt. Too little is spent on the position of Turkey and the historical context there, or the role of Mustafa Kemal Attaturk in the campaign and his subsequent rise to power and transformation of Turkey. This is extremely relevant for Turkey today and it would have helped viewers to get that perspective in, even if only in an introductory piece of text.

Nothing can compare with the realism of the beach landing and battle scenes of 'Saving Private Ryan' but unfortunately the comparison puts 'Gallipoli' very definitely in the shade. The viewer simply does not get anything like the same impression of the slaughter involved in war. If this was deliberate, to obtain a lower grading for the film, to increase its audience among children, it was perhaps an error of judgement. If children are to learn anything about war it should not be about the fun of boot camp but about the horror of bodies being torn apart.
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