Customer Reviews


6 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nobody's best friend...other than their own
In this volume that is accompanied by a CD containing an 80-minute video seminar, Bryan and Jeffrey Eisenberg with Lisa T. Davis explain how to persuade people to purchase what you sell at a time "when they ignore marketing." That is, emerging media have redefined "the rules of the game" in the competitive marketplace. First the bad news: traditional mass marketing models...
Published on 5 Mar 2007 by Robert Morris

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Title suggests more than one actually gets: Nothing more than an average marketing book
I am a finance person, but have been very interested in marketing lately. This book was suggested by one of my acquaintances. Unfortunately I must say that the book leaves some bitter taste after reading.

It starts promisingly and catches your eye quite fast. But then I realised that the contents are quite narrow and the language is highly theoretical. Even the...
Published on 16 Jan 2008 by Van Koks


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nobody's best friend...other than their own, 5 Mar 2007
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
In this volume that is accompanied by a CD containing an 80-minute video seminar, Bryan and Jeffrey Eisenberg with Lisa T. Davis explain how to persuade people to purchase what you sell at a time "when they ignore marketing." That is, emerging media have redefined "the rules of the game" in the competitive marketplace. First the bad news: traditional mass marketing models are no longer appropriate. Now the good news: businesses now have an unprecedented opportunity to communicate effectively with customers by leveraging the power of increasingly interconnected media channels. The authors suggest a number of strategies and tactics by which to do that.

Throughout their narrative, they answer questions such as these:

1. How and why has marketing permanently changed?

2. Why do customers now respond differently?

3. How to anticipate what they now require?

4. How to respond to those requirements?

5. How to bridge the gap between "old" and "new" marketing?

In response to the last question, they offer "Persuasion Architecture" and then explain how to implement it in Chapter Twenty-Nine.

Over the years, I have owned dozens of dogs and cats, and agree with the authors that there are significant differences between them. A source I am unable to recall suggests that a dog's idea of God is man; a cat's idea of God is another cat. The pets I have owned certainly gave me that impression. The authors suggest that "old" marketing follows a recipe that they characterize as "Customers a la Pavlov." Over time, their responses can be conditioned and, through certain repetitions of influence, controlled. Not so with "new" marketing which assumes that customers resemble cats. Unlike dogs that are so eager to please, cats could not care less. They are aloof, indifferent, self-indulgent, independent, solitary, and act in ways that benefit only themselves.

It is worth noting that, given all the major changes in the American workplace, Warren Bennis suggests that managing people is like herding cats and wrote a book bearing that title.

This book's title may state it but, obviously, cats do not, indeed cannot bark. And even if they could, they probably would not because that would be - as they see it - beneath them. The first objectives with cats as well as with customers is to get their attention, then convince them (somehow) that what you have in mind is in their best interests. To the authors' credit, they devote most of attention in their book to the "how" and "why" of mass marketing rather than to the "what."

Whether or not Persuasion Architecture makes sense and would be appropriate for the needs of the reader's own organization is for her or him to determine. My own rather extensive experience suggests that a transition from "old" to "new" marketing (or from "old" to "new" anything) invariably creates significant challenges, especially in terms of cultural barriers. Change agents are certain to face resistance because of what James O'Toole aptly characterizes as "the ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom."

Persuasion Architecture offers a comprehensive, cohesive, and cost-effective methodology by which to launch and then sustain profitable mass marketing. There are others worthy of consideration. Whatever the eventual decision, commit to a methodology (rather than to a bromide) and keep in mind that the transition from "old" marketing to "new" marketing is a marathon, not a sprint. Also keep in mind, as you begin, what Peter Drucker observed (in 1963) in an article published in the Harvard Business Review: "There is surely nothing quite so useless as doing with great efficiency what should not be done at all."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Put It All Together, 11 Feb 2007
Sometimes a marketing book is dull and boring and a rip off - but not this one. Putting together their collective experience helping companies market themselves on the web and traditional media, the authors make it clear - consumers are no longer Pavlovian Dogs - they have somehow morphed into independent Cats - and no one can train a cat to respond to stimulation. With the growing influence of the Web consumers have been enabled to be fickle and in control of their experience - This book attempts to deal with that fact by identifying the various "Personas" and processes that are key to the buying experience - using that knowledge to enable sales to be pulled through the information maze. Since reading this book I have re-evaluated my company's marketing, and begun a thorough revision.

Easy to read and well structured, "Waiting..." is a strong and useful tool. I have sent it to friends in business as a valuable present.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Straightforward, detailed guide to new media marketing, 24 Mar 2011
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
You live in a new multimedia world. Customers call the tune, and marketers need to know how to make them dance. Techno-savvy, web-savvy and advertising-savvy consumers know all about your marketing methods and consider themselves immune. You must cajole, persuade and seduce them into hearing your message and wanting your product. Marketing experts Bryan and Jeffrey Eisenberg, writing with Lisa T. Davis, have learned to understand and translate this new marketing paradigm, calling it "Persuasion Architecture." In their straightforward and anecdotal, if jargony, book - a standard that is slightly showing its age - they provide the overview, principles, strategy and techniques you need to find, attract and keep the right customers. getAbstract recommends this informative guide to marketers and salespeople seeking solid backgrounding.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars so many things that have been staring me in the face, 5 Sep 2012
By 
Ladylawn (Feltwell, Norfolk) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
"Waiting for your cat to bark?" Is an insight into what potential buyers need to find on a website before they part with their cash. In an increasingly competitive environment it's vital to have this type of knowledge. I'm only part way through the book and already changing the way I think about e-commerce. Read this book .... You won't regret it
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Good concept, but bit outdated, 30 May 2011
By 
Daniel Vaczi (UK, London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I like the 'persona-lization' idea, which i haven't tested but i can see it working. The book is a bit outdated because it doesn't cover advanced retargeting methods like behavioural targeting. Good reading overall.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Title suggests more than one actually gets: Nothing more than an average marketing book, 16 Jan 2008
I am a finance person, but have been very interested in marketing lately. This book was suggested by one of my acquaintances. Unfortunately I must say that the book leaves some bitter taste after reading.

It starts promisingly and catches your eye quite fast. But then I realised that the contents are quite narrow and the language is highly theoretical. Even the examples seemed fairly theoretical and played around some virtual 'personas'. In comparison to other marketing books that I have read this was highly disappointing. I would have wished a lot more of a practical touch.

The book mainly concentrates on the internet marketing and B2B customers. I understand that the authors have developed a theory/methodology called 'Persuasion Architecture' which is put forward as some kind of a Holy Grail for marketing. Unfortunately I could not fully understand the principles of the theory as the authors failed to describe it comprehensively.

As I am more interested in retail marketing, the book obvioulsy did not meet my expectations. May be it was not intended for areas that I was expecting. I my eyes this is just another average marketing book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews