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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jew in the Holocaust asked for forgivness by a dying Nazi
Weisenthal, a Jew in a concentration camp in the Holocaust, is pulled out of work one day to listen to the confession of a dying SS man. The Nazi is truly repentant of his horrendous sins, and asks Weisenthal for forgivness. Even after Weisenthal makes his decision as to what to say, he spends the rest of his life wondering if he made the right choice. This book...
Published on 28 Sep 1998

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3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
This was not quite as absorbing as I had expected. I found the basic storyline difficult to believe as factual - it read more like a parable. The individual essays on the subject of forgiveness were a bit repetitive although the one which explained the Jewish dogma on forgiveness was interesting.
Published 10 months ago by P. Wheeler


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars keeps going through your mind, 18 July 2013
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Something about this book keeps coming back to haunt me. It is split into two parts - in the first the author tells of his life in a Nazi concentration camp and of the time a dying Nazi asks him for forgiveness for the horrific murders of defenseless Jews. The author is unsure what to do at the time, and continues to ask himself and others what he should have done. After the war he finds the dead man's mother and learns more about him.
In the second part of the book various people say what they believe the author should have done - some say he should have shown compassion, some say he showed too much compassion, others say he behaved appropriately and one rather silly person suggests he should have smothered the Nazi (and presumably brought the wrath of the Third Reich onto every soul the author had ever met).

This is a book I believe every school child in the world should read and discuss as it teaches history, psychology, theology and philosophy in a practical way. Even though I read it months ago the images and questions it raised while I read it still come back to haunt me.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Sunflower is a dramatic & moving story about WWII, 28 Sep 1998
By A Customer
The Sunflower is the story of a dying Nazi SS soldier who calls Simon Wiesenthal, the author, into his hospital room and asks for forgiveness for the crimes he has committed. Wiesenthal leaves the room in silence without fufilling the Nazi's dying wish: to be forgivien by a Jew. The book also describes Simon Wiesenthal's own experiences in the concentration camps and instances where he was a vicitm of an anti-semitic movment. This book greatly moved me and opened my eyes to even more amazement and wonderment that I have have ever known about World War II and the Holocaust. It was an excellent read and yet a mildly depressing one, too.
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