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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jew in the Holocaust asked for forgivness by a dying Nazi
Weisenthal, a Jew in a concentration camp in the Holocaust, is pulled out of work one day to listen to the confession of a dying SS man. The Nazi is truly repentant of his horrendous sins, and asks Weisenthal for forgivness. Even after Weisenthal makes his decision as to what to say, he spends the rest of his life wondering if he made the right choice. This book...
Published on 28 Sep 1998

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3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
This was not quite as absorbing as I had expected. I found the basic storyline difficult to believe as factual - it read more like a parable. The individual essays on the subject of forgiveness were a bit repetitive although the one which explained the Jewish dogma on forgiveness was interesting.
Published 5 months ago by P. Wheeler


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5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read book that challenges your belief in humanity., 13 April 2014
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A very thought-provoking and timeless book that I would definitely recommend. The story itself really questions your beliefs on justice and morality, and the responses that make up the bulk of the book are often very surprising. This is a book that should be passed from generation to generation to remind the world of atrocities that still haunt us.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 29 Jan 2014
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This review is from: The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness (Kindle Edition)
This was not quite as absorbing as I had expected. I found the basic storyline difficult to believe as factual - it read more like a parable. The individual essays on the subject of forgiveness were a bit repetitive although the one which explained the Jewish dogma on forgiveness was interesting.
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5.0 out of 5 stars the sunflower, 16 Jan 2014
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This review is from: The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness (Kindle Edition)
I was fascinated with the book because it provoked considerable thought and I am still in turmoil .Having considered all the opinions in the symposium one is still left thinking…. why?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 13 Jan 2014
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This review is from: The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness (Kindle Edition)
The only thing that's disappointing about this is the introduction - as it fails to mention other genocides that have happened since 1945 or argues that they constituted "acts of genocide" rather than genocide.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Thoughtprovoking, 9 Jan 2014
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A very interesting and thought provoking read. It certainly gives some context to Wiesenthal's relentless pursuit of holocaust war criminals.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A briliantly thought-provoking book, 19 Sep 2013
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This review is from: The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness (Kindle Edition)
This book made my head spin. It is a book which places the reader precisely in Weisenthal's situation.There are so many variations to the basic question which is asked that I needed to read to the last page and then have meditation time, before I could make my own personal answer,
A book which deals with a very deep, if not the deepest, moral dilemma.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very thought provoking, 16 April 2013
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This review is from: The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness (Kindle Edition)
Have discussed with some of my friends and it it always quite a serious discussion based on both religion, humanism and the holocaust. Well worth a read, some of the responses are perhaps surprising and some of them may change your initial reaction, if not necessarily for the reasons you'd expect.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What would I do...I really don't know, 2 Mar 2010
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A. J. Tainty (Dyserth, N. Wales) - See all my reviews
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I heard about this book from a colleague in work and bought it the same afternoon.

I was totally overwhelmed by the first part of the book that raised the question, learning things about the mistreatment of Jews in Poland long before the war. Once into the views of the contributors over the issue of 'what they would have done' I was riveted and could not put the book down. Only the Dalai Lama's view was predictable and seemed to have no depth (the depth part surprised me).

I would recommend this book to anyone, interested or not in the holocaust. It raises more questions than it answers and certainly made me look at things differently.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking- what would you do?, 22 Nov 2000
One book that i cant forget. Would you forgive someone who has committed crimes against humanity and yourself. Beautifully written that holds no punches. the author bears his soul and suffers terrible conflict on top of all the suffering that he has endured.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars keeps going through your mind, 18 July 2013
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Something about this book keeps coming back to haunt me. It is split into two parts - in the first the author tells of his life in a Nazi concentration camp and of the time a dying Nazi asks him for forgiveness for the horrific murders of defenseless Jews. The author is unsure what to do at the time, and continues to ask himself and others what he should have done. After the war he finds the dead man's mother and learns more about him.
In the second part of the book various people say what they believe the author should have done - some say he should have shown compassion, some say he showed too much compassion, others say he behaved appropriately and one rather silly person suggests he should have smothered the Nazi (and presumably brought the wrath of the Third Reich onto every soul the author had ever met).

This is a book I believe every school child in the world should read and discuss as it teaches history, psychology, theology and philosophy in a practical way. Even though I read it months ago the images and questions it raised while I read it still come back to haunt me.
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