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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "What is a director that cannot direct?"
"The lives of others" (= "Das leben der anderen") is a wonderful film directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, that won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film. Truth to be told, I hadn't heard his name before, but I'm certain that I won't forget it now. This film, his debut as a director, is simply exceptional. An engaging political thriller, this movie is at the same time...
Published on 7 May 2007 by M. B. Alcat

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars an okay film.
Although it may appeal to some, "The lives of others",did not turn my crank. It lacks some important ingredient but I'm not sure what that ingredient may be.
Published 5 months ago by Michael


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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "What is a director that cannot direct?", 7 May 2007
"The lives of others" (= "Das leben der anderen") is a wonderful film directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, that won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film. Truth to be told, I hadn't heard his name before, but I'm certain that I won't forget it now. This film, his debut as a director, is simply exceptional. An engaging political thriller, this movie is at the same time a complex study regarding the power of choices, and the way we behave when faced to our worst fears.

The story is set in East Germany in 1984, when the lack of freedom and the zeal of the Secret Police (Stasi) were pervasive. Captain Gerd Wiesler (Ulrich Mühe) is an agent that specializes in discovering "traitors", that is, those that don't agree with everything that the government says. Wiesler is very good at his job, and has no mercy for those that don't add up to his ideal of what a good socialist should be.

That is probably the reason why his superior assigns him the task of of spying on Georg Dreyman (Sebastian Koch), a well-known socialist playwright that is nonetheless suspicious, due to his friends. Dreyman lives with his girlfriend, Christa-Maria Sieland (Martina Gedeck), a talented actress that loves him but has sexual trysts with a powerful government official that promises her that she will never be in the black list of artist that cannot work.

As Wiesler learns more about the couple, thanks to the hidden microphones his team installed in their apartment, he starts warming towards them. He even protects them when Dreyman becomes actively involved in "subversive" activities, as a reaction to the suicide of a friend that had been blacklisted. But how far will Wiesler risk himself? And can human beings really change?

Strangely enough, "The lives of others" tackles those difficult questions in a manner that leaves nothing to be desired, and makes you think almost involuntarily about many more that have to do with them. On the whole, I must say that I cannot recommend this film strongly enough. Please don't miss it...

Belen Alcat, May 2007
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98 of 100 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, 23 Dec 2007
By 
This review is from: The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
This film holds you spellbound. I saw it first in the cinema and you could have heard a pin drop. Had read the critics rave reviews particularly about one actor but didn't realise who it was until about half hour into the film. Ulrich Muhe is absolutely superb in his role as the Stasi Officer. He gives a faultless performance. He dominates every scene. How sad to find out he died not too long after making this film. This film is without doubt the best film I have seen in many years. The atmosphere of the GDR inhibits you. The horrors and loss of liberty suddenly become real to the viewer in a way that has never been portrayed before. Fantastic direction of superb actors at a magnificent pace. Buy this and add it to your collection, it will become a classic.
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259 of 266 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easily one of the top five films I have ever seen..., 23 July 2007
This review is from: The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
Utterly, utterly wonderful. This is a story of redemption and atonement and explores whether, and to what extent, they are possible. The contrast of the personal joy, love, friendship, kinship and art, against the backdrop and circumstance of the 1984 GDR is completely sublime and the direction is faultless. It is the acting that is jaw-dropping though - an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film is fantastic recognition, but at least three of the four major acting gongs would have found a more deserved home here. The ending is the most appropriate and well edited I have ever come across and left me in tears - a personal first for any film. I cannot give it higher praise than the truth - I have never seen better cinema than this. Enjoy.
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135 of 140 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A sad, thoughtful and redemptive film, 9 Jun 2007
By 
C. O. DeRiemer (San Antonio, Texas, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
The Lives of Others (Das Leben der Anderen) is one of the best films I've seen in a long, long time. It's sad, thoughtful and redemptive, and it deals with major themes. We're in East Germany a few years before the fall of the Berlin wall. The Stasi are everywhere, watching everyone and punishing in brutal or subtle ways anyone who might be even an implied threat to the government. Their greatest tool is the system of informers that reaches everywhere, people who may relay indiscretions to the Stasi because they believe in what they are doing, but more often are compromised into doing so. People are given terrible choices to either work with the Stasi as informers or see their careers or their children's futures destroyed. One-third of the East German population is kept under Stasi surveillance. Everyone, it seems, is being watched by someone.

Georg Dreyman (Sebastian Koch) is a playwright who has made his accommodations with the regime, has won awards and has learned not to go too far. The mere fact that he is seen as reliable makes him a subject of Stasi interest. That, and because his lover, the actress Christa-Maria Sieland (Martina Gedeck), is coveted by a powerful official who wants Dreyman ruined. Hauptmann Gerd Wiesler (Ulrich Muhe), a dedicated, colorless Stasi officer, noted for his reliability and interrogation skills, is assigned the job of monitoring Dreyman. This means installing bugs in Dreyman's apartment where Dreyman lives with Sieland, setting up 24 hour monitoring, recording everything and preparing reports. Wiesler takes his share of listening in. Weisler seems to have no purpose but his dedication to the ideals of the East German system, but even he can see the corruption of those ideals. He has no friends to speak of except his boss, who knows which way the wind can shift. Dreyman, on the other hand, is a handsome man of talent who loves Christa and who has seen a close friend and talented director banned from the theater for speaking too clearly. Dreyman gradually finds the conscience he had put on hold in order to be successful. Wiesler gradually finds himself, through listening in, drawn to an awareness of the compromises and corruption he knows has seeped into a system he once believed in. Even more subtly, he finds himself drawn into the lives of Dreyman and Christa-Maria. Slowly, cautiously and anonymously, Wiesler begins to protect Dreyman. All the while we are witness to the pervasive spying on people, the pettiness, the corruption of authority, the use of subtle threats to keep people in line, the almost comic meticulousness of the Stasi and their obsessive record keeping on everyone. The conclusion of the film brings us well past the fall of the Berlin wall, when the full evidence of Stasi spying and the corruption of so many to be informers became evident. We see what happened to both Dreyman and Wiesler. I found the ending to be very, very emotional.

This was director von Donnersmarck's first feature film. He also was the writer. The acting is just as good as the film, particularly Muhe, Koch and Gedeck. Muhe has perhaps the toughest job. He has to show us this dedicated functionary first relentlessly breaking a suspect through calm, psychological questioning, then gradually, gradually letting us see Wiesler's doubts and humanity as he listens into to the lives of Dreyman and Sieland. Muhe makes us aware of Wiesler's changing outlook no faster than Weisler becomes aware of them himself. It's a subtle, strong performance.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favourite film of 2007, 20 Jan 2008
By 
russell clarke "stipesdoppleganger" (halifax, west yorks) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
The Lives Of Others(Or Leben der Anderen Das) is my favourite film of 2007. I have seen it twice now and on the first time viewing thought it a compelling but rather static film. However having watched it again recently i have now come to the conclusion that the film is a superbly conceived discreet masterpiece.
What is truly remarkable about The Lives Of Others is that for a film running for 137 minutes it is very light on plot. For great swathes of the narrative nothing really propels the film forward but it still retains a mesmeric fascination. Set in East Germany in 1984 it tells the story of Stasis officer Wiesler( Urich Muhe) who is designated by his supercilious superior Grubitz( (Ulrich Tukur) to set up surveillance on playwright Georg Dreyman (Sebastian Koch). Their reasons for doing so are flimsy at best ,based more on supposition than anything and an instinctive mistrust of artists.
Dreyman is having an affair with an actress Christa -Maria( Martina Gedeck) working on his latest production who is also lusted after by the repellent Minister Bruno Hempf ( Thomas Thieme). As Wiesler spends hours, sat in a dingy attic surrounded by his surveillance equipment, diligently logging every conversation he hears in Drayman's flat he gradually changes his affiliation towards the couple and this leads to an inexorable shift in his perception of the political system he works for. Eventually he neglects to mention incriminating evidence in his logs and as it becomes clear Dreyman is indeed implicated in activity that would have him marked out as an enemy of the state Weiss resorts to methods increasingly dangerous to himself in order to cover up for him. What ultimately transpires is full of tragedy and pathos and the final scene is a beautifully composed and moving testament to how one mans actions can have a resounding influence on the destiny of another.
First time director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck who wrote the script as well does a remarkable job of portraying the austerity and paranoia in East Germany at that time. The film is shot in muted tones to reflect this with Wiesler always dressed in grey and hunched into himself to reflect his myopic world view. Urich Muhe gives a superb performance as Weisler, reining himself in to express everything through his slightly craggy visage and effusive eyes as his character realises the futility and melancholy of his existence, though it must be said all the cast acquit themselves admirably.
The Lives Of Others is imbued with various themes-love, faith, loyalty, deception, redemption sacrifice( And others I'm probably not perceptive enough to notice) and has numerous scenes that stay with the viewer. Apart from the fantastic final scene the one where Weisler steaming open envelopes hears of the fall of the wall and just gets up and walks out of the room without saying a word is especially memorable. A great film all the better for it's quiet subtlety and understated gradations , a lesson many other film makers could do with taking notice of.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Lives of Others, 29 April 2007
1984 is an inauspicious date for the setting of this fine movie about the East German autocracy. Whereas films like 'Goodbye Lenin' inspired a trend of nostalgia (coined as OSTalgia) for the GDR, 'The Life of Others' paints a more realistic picture. In a thoughtful, humane work, Stasi captain Gerd Wiesler is given a surveillance mission to spy on playwright Georg Dreyman and his actress girlfriend Christa-Maria Sieland. Weisler is an unquestioning party loyalist and cog in the Stasi machinery who takes pleasure in his thorough and exacting approach to such a mission. A dilligent professional, he is certainly not a sadist, but simply an automaton who divests emotional responsibility in the careful pursuit of his work. There is a brilliant early scene at the theatre where he is given his mission. Sitting in the Gods you are made privvy to the global perspective of a surveillance expert, the professional pleasure in his cold assessment of the situation. However, in a plot with shades of Francis Ford Copolla's masterpiece The Conversation, he find himself slowly drawn to the couple and ultimately implicated in their fate. Although it could also be suggested that there is a hint of 'Rear Window' about the story, Weisler's gradual softening of perspective is less Hitchcock-style obsession or voyeurism but rather about a lonely man warmed vicariously by the live and loves of others (hence the title).

Georg and Christa-Maria's existence is one (un)governed by the senses, by friendship and romance. Their flat is warmly photographed as a haven of free expression, of literature, music and art. By contrast Weisler returns to his spartan appartment with only state propagandist television for company or entertainment. Furthermore, the soft warm tones of the couple's home is shown in stark opposition to Weisler's austere attic surveillance center, itself drained of almost all colour. Weisler chalks a map of the couples' flat on the bare floorboards of the gloomy attic, further illustrating his immersion in their lives but also his isolation from it. Brilliantly cast, Ulrich Mühe's Weisler has the emotionally fridgid and dispassionate features of a lobotomised Kevin Spacey. As his heart thaws, his expression softens in the subtlest of degrees, his marble eyes acquiring a human liquidity. In one scene, when Weisler weeps to the sound of Georg playing the piano, a tear erupts from his unchanged face as if the ice within him has melted. His emotional distance is also emphasised in another starkly lit scene in which Weisler has a brutally perfuntary encounter with a prostitute who makes it clear his time is on the meter. It's a understated masterpiece that - despite its sinister and ultimately tragic themes - doesn't resort to explicit violence or melodrama. It is also given levity by the subtlety of Ulrich Mühe's performance, and the humanity of the ending, which I won't spoil by divulging here.
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80 of 83 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great film-making, 22 Mar 2008
By 
B. Miller (Laois, Ireland.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
Upon hearing the rave reviews for this film and noticing that it had won Best Foreign Picture at the Oscars, I was expecting to be a little disappointed. How wrong I was. This film does nothing spectacularly different or innovative. It just tells its story and tells it extremely well.
The acting is amazing and if the Oscars had any credibility then Ulrich Muhe would have been nominated in the best actor category. His character starts off as cold and not very likeable, however, we gradually warm to him and by the end my opinion of him had changed utterly. I've only learned upon reading this page that Muhe died shortly after completing this film. It really is a fitting tribute.
It's one of the few films that has moved me to tears by the end and it wasn't achieved by cheap sentimentality but a genuinely moving story and fantastic performances all round.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 24 Jan 2008
By 
P. MCKEEVER "The Blue Review" (UK London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
I started to watch this film with my wife and daughter who were both immediately put off by the sub-titles, so they wandered off and did other things while I watched it to the end. They should have stayed because they missed one of the great films of the modern era. It is one of the most gripping films that I have seen in years. Beautifully acted, wonderfully written and very, very chilling. Through a tragic love storey set in the communist controlled East Germany it defines the statement, 'all that is needed for evil to triumph is for good men to stand by and do nothing'. If you take the freedom we enjoy in the western world for granted, watch this film and learn what you can lose if society slips into totalitarianism, whether it's of the left, right or religious variety.
You must watch this film.
Paul McKeever
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly spellbinding, 1 Jun 2008
This review is from: The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
I've not ever reviewed a film here before. But, having seen some of the poor ratings this film received from some (unbelievable) people, I felt compelled to write this review. This film is gripping from the very first second to the last. It is engaging on every level. It is spectacularly acted and directed. The score is excellent. The plot is amazing. If you have ANY interest in the GDR, the Cold War, German history or just damn good cinema, watch this film. If I could rate it with 10 stars it wouldn't do this film justice. Having spent much time in former East Berlin recently, visitning the Stasi HQ, it was eerie to see it on screen.....
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Don't Forget Your Audience", 5 Mar 2008
By 
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This review is from: The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
GDR 1984.Senior Stasi Officer Weisler(the late Ulrich Muhe)is assigned to eavesdrop on famous playwright Georg Dreyman(Sebastian Koch)and his actress girlfriend Christa Maria Sieland(Martina Gedeck).A jealous high ranking minister who covets Sieland for himself mistrusts Dreyman because he cannot believe that the playwright's true artistic instincts won't one day supercede his allegiance to the state.
Taut political thriller is deliberately paced but meticulously crafted with impeccable performances(Muhe and Gedeck in particular)with Muhe's character, as he is drawn into their lifestyle, starting to question his own faith in the system when he is watching people who are seeking to create a more balanced and open socialist state through art and thus peacefully challenging the status quo.
The film's depiction of the Stasi's constant surveillance and the constant refining of their"interrogation"techniques is chilling and while not without a contrivance or two, The Lives Of Others is a superb film worthy of its Oscar for Best Foreign Feature at the 2007 awards.The ending while a touch sentimental is an emotional tour de force laying bare the sacrifices that have been made.
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The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006]
The Lives of Others [DVD] [2006] by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck (DVD - 2007)
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