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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What would you do if you were in his place?
"I confess" (1953) is a film that is difficult to watch, but also regarding. This is not my favorite Hitchcock film, but I am glad I saw it, even though at times it was hard to endure all the things the main character had to go through in order to stay true to his beliefs.

The main character is Father Logan (Montgomery Clift), a priest that becomes the main...
Published on 15 Mar 2007 by M. B. Alcat

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I never thought of the priesthood as offering a hiding place
One of Hitchcock's lesser feted works, or least known to the casual audience, sees Montgomery Clift take the role of Father Michael Logan a priest who hears a confession from a murderer and then is accused of the murder himself. Having no wish to reveal what was said to him, Logan must put his faith in the justice system to come up with the right result.

It's...
Published on 17 Aug 2008 by IWFIcon


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What would you do if you were in his place?, 15 Mar 2007
"I confess" (1953) is a film that is difficult to watch, but also regarding. This is not my favorite Hitchcock film, but I am glad I saw it, even though at times it was hard to endure all the things the main character had to go through in order to stay true to his beliefs.

The main character is Father Logan (Montgomery Clift), a priest that becomes the main suspect of a crime. He knows who the real murderer is, but cannot tell that to the police due to the fact that he had been told that in a confession. As circumstantial evidence condemns him, and people accuse him of shameful deeds, will Father Logan tell what he knows, or will he go on suffering, keeping the secret of confession ?

Montgomery Clift is perfect in his portrayal of Father Logan, a man of integrity faced with a crisis of conscience in a very trying situation. You cannot help being affected by the moral dilemma that Father Logan faces, because Clift conveys his anguish and sadness extremely well. You end up asking yourself a very difficult question: what would you do if you were in his place?

"I confess" (1953) is a beautiful film about difficult choices, and staying true to what we believe in. Even though most of this movie is pretty somber, the ending brings a note of hope that leaves the spectator thoughtful but not sad. Of course, recommended...

Belen Alcat
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What would you do!, 4 Sep 2009
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This review is from: I Confess [1953] [DVD] (DVD)
A nice little movie from hitchcock,slow burning and building to an unforgettable climax.Father Michael Logan(Montgomery Clift)hears a killer`s confession but cannot divulge the contents of the confession to the police inspector(Karl Malden)and in turn becomes a suspect.The disc comes with a making of(20:41) newsreel footage(0:57) and a trailer(2:41).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I never thought of the priesthood as offering a hiding place, 17 Aug 2008
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IWFIcon - See all my reviews
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This review is from: I Confess [1953] [DVD] (DVD)
One of Hitchcock's lesser feted works, or least known to the casual audience, sees Montgomery Clift take the role of Father Michael Logan a priest who hears a confession from a murderer and then is accused of the murder himself. Having no wish to reveal what was said to him, Logan must put his faith in the justice system to come up with the right result.

It's hardly a unique concept in a Hitchcock film, but it is a stirring plot nevertheless. Clift, who isn't given much dialogue, is more than adequate in his role and is ably assissted by a warm supporting cast. Anne Baxter, as Ruth Gradnfort - a former lover of Logan from his "pre-priest" days is less of a success. She's solid enough, but lacks the depth that OE Hasse and Dolly Haas, for instance, bring to their "lesser" roles. How much of this is the fault of the script is open to question and Baxter is not helped by the long and, frankly, tedious flashback that explains her character's history with Logan.

I Confess was a long labour of love for the director, and censorship issues of the time meant that the final scrpit was markedly different from the one which Hitchcock was pushing for. (In Hitchcock's original thesis, Montgomery Clift hangs for the crime and the backstory between Logan and Grandfort is much more logically explained as involving an illegitamate child). In a twist worthy of one of the man's films, Clift was disappointed with the new script when he arrived for filming, having taken the role on the basis of the orginal one, but it was too late for him to back out.

What remains is a strong enough film, and one of Hitchock's most sombre. It's perhaps not what the casual cinema goer would expect from Hitchock but it is most definately worth a look. You can't help feeling though that it might have been even better if Hitchcock would have had the chance to make the story he really wanted to.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Underrated Hitchcock Classic, 3 April 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: I Confess [VHS] (VHS Tape)
'I Confess' fills a small gap on a very large CV of Alfred Hitchcock between 'Strangers On A Train' and 'Dial M For Murder', yet it deserves far more credit than this.
I was gripped from start to finish by the moody film noir undertones as well as the excellent performance by Montgomery Clift.
This film deserves so much more than to be sandwiched by some classics, it's a classic in its own right.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Clift's Compelling Central Performance, 10 Jun 2013
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Keith M - See all my reviews
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This review is from: I Confess [1953] [DVD] (DVD)
This 1953 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock (from a play by Paul Anthelme) is, for me, something of a mixed bag - not a particularly distinctive 'Hitchcock film' and with some overly melodramatic acting (particularly early on), but the film's relatively novel storyline, a particularly impressive final 20 minutes and (best of all) an increasingly convincing turn from Montgomery Clift as the film's compromised priest, in the end make for a pretty engaging viewing experience. The film actually gets off to an impressive start (visually, at least) as cinematographer Robert Burks' (black and white) camera lingers on a raised silhouetted building - later revealed to be a church, but at first sight reminiscent of Psycho's infamous equivalent - as Dimitri Tiomkin's initially sweeping, then increasingly ominous, score bears down on us. Indeed, Burks' work in conveying the (at times) claustrophobic (church interior) atmosphere and the film's spectacularly evocative Quebec setting is impressive throughout.

For me, the early sequences in I Confess suffer rather from a combination of convoluted plot (as Clift's priest, Father Michael Logan, is torn between covering up for refugee worker, Otto's deadly, impetuous crime and confession, and the rekindling of his - now 'forbidden' - youthful romance with Anne Baxter's married woman, Ruth) and some rather stilted and (at times) overdone acting. The film also rather disappoints in terms of trademark Hitchcock touches and set-pieces - whilst there are some nice camera close-ups, hinting at characters' potential guilt and suspicions, for example where Logan's head is framed against a religious cross backdrop as he gives courtroom testimony, it is (I would argue) not until the film's final denouement that we really get some authentic touches from the master.

Having said all of this, each of Baxter's vulnerable and increasingly desperate Ruth, Karl Malden's persistent police detective, Larrue, Brian Aherne's calmly, meticulous prosecuting attorney Willy Robertson, and (particularly) Otto Hasse's increasingly manic and malevolent namesake, all (eventually) deliver impressive turns. But (for me, at least) what (to a large extent) carries the film is Clift's reserved central performance as the tortured soul torn between his religious vocation and his human desires, and whose calm, stoic resilience becomes increasingly engaging and powerful as the film progresses, resulting in (for me) one of his finest screen performances. Hitch also includes some typical darkly humorous touches (providing an interesting contrast with the film's serious themes), including the running gag concerning one of Logan's fellow priests' bicycle.

For me, therefore, not absolutely top notch Hitchcock but well worth seeing, not least for Clift's impressive performance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alfred Hitchkoc work, 17 Jan 2013
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This review is from: I Confess [1953] [DVD] (DVD)
No comment it is an all time classic movie with the stamp of great director like Alfred Hitchcock. Admired by my family and by me as well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well shot picture of crime versus religion, 15 Dec 2009
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This review is from: I Confess [1953] [DVD] (DVD)
Father Logan (Clift) listens to the confession of a murderer but soon he becomes the prime suspect.

I confess is a riveting suspenseful crime drama owing to a tantalizing script, a bravado performance by its central star and some majestic craftsmanship by the master of suspense, who starts the film in a wonderful cameo, no one else does crime quite like Alfred Hitchcock.

The opening sees the Brit walking silently through the streets as we flicker through the deserted streets and eventually see one man walking away, silently to the church where Father Logan is and this start sets the picture in motion.

The man in question is Otto Keller, a man who confesses to murder and when the body is found and Logan knows the truth he is bound by the rules of the church and we see the police suspicions grow and the script and action getting edgier as the plot builds and builds on glorious suspense.

Perhaps comparing this to The Da Vinci Code would do The Hitch an injustice, given the way the Ron Howard picture was rejected. However I enjoyed Tom Hanks and Audrey Tautou fighting religion against crime and this 1953 picture does well to balance it as well. The rules of the church and his belief allows Logan no freedom to express what he really knows but adds an extra dimension to the character's belief and faith, reflecting well the projecting of right and wrong.

Montgomery Clift is finely shot as the Priest, giving this belief system a true working through hard expressions when his personal life coincides with the murder case. When things get too personal Logan is quick to step in and the strength of Clift's performance allows us to associate with his uncomfortable position and we are comfortable in routing for him. His rash thinking in the final few scenes is brilliant.

I confess has only a few faults. Anne Baxter isn't the most memorable of the Hitchcock femme fatales. Whilst her character is a necessity to the picture her presence is not as strong and over powering as you would hope for. There are moments when the suspense wavers and there is too much drawing of conclusions.

Nevertheless the thankful saviour of Hitchcock provides us with still hunger and drive to carry on watching with his truly brilliant eye for detail and momentum to keep things going. As mentioned the opening is well shot and the drastic final acts provide nervousness with a splash of adrenaline and drama to complete a very good picture.

8.5/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, 13 Oct 2009
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This review is from: I Confess [1953] [DVD] (DVD)
Otto Keller (O E Hasse) kills a lawyer called Vilette and confesses to Father Logan (Montgomery Clift). Logan keeps the confession secret as Inspector Larrue (Karl Malden) investigates the case. It soon emerges that Ruth (Anne Baxter) has been meeting Logan without her husband Pierre (Roger Dann) knowing. Circumstances emerge so as to point the finger of guilt for Vilette's murder at Logan. When Ruth goes to provide Larrue with an alibi for Logan, things don't work out as planned..........

Clift is very good in the lead as a priest struggling to do the right thing (his face says everything) and it's a very well acted film by the rest of the cast as well, except for 2 young French girls who sound like they are affecting terribly false French accents. There are some very good scenes, eg, the way that Malden and Clift play each other when Clift is questioned about what he knows. The film keeps you watching with good drama and tension throughout. It's good.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five stars are not enough..!!, 7 July 2008
This review is from: I Confess [1953] [DVD] (DVD)
This movie is nothing short of brilliant. Montgomery Clift (the priest) is exceptional, by any standard, modern or classic, and Anne Baxter seems to out-class most modern actresses by a few yards. The story is unbeatable, somehow there isn't a lot to it, but even scenes that should be boring are laden with suspense. This is cinema at it's best, it's is instructional and educational, as well as suspenseful, and meaningful.

I can only give it five stars, so I will. But I would have given it six, scratch that, I would have given it seven. Anne Baxter stands out, she also did a wonderful job in 'The Ten Commandments', she has real class, and it is a joy to watch her, you just don't see that in Hollywood anymore, perhaps there is too much money involved, or we simply don't have that old world piety, old world religiosity, these days. She comes across as almost having nobility, I can't describe it any better. She is admirable, nothing short of admirable.

Give this movie a go, if you are not sure, take a chance, even if it is black and white, and crude by modern standards, it has a story and a passion you don't get in much more expensive movies, I would say modern 'epics' like Titanic has nothing on this movie.

This movie is a gem, I had it recommended by a priest in fact, and it is a tremendous look at the priesthood, and confession, what it is all about. An amazing story, timeless, because it touches as much today as it did fifty years ago, just as much.

What a movie!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 29 Jun 2014
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This review is from: I Confess [1953] [DVD] (DVD)
A work of genius !!!
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I Confess [1953] [DVD]
I Confess [1953] [DVD] by Alfred Hitchcock (DVD - 2008)
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