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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant translation of one of the world's greatest classics, which is a contemporary masterpiece with a rich heritage.
Crime and Punishment has to be one of the greatest novels ever written, and which is an outstanding, supreme example of fine literature at its very best. This English version still manages to capture the forcefulness and frightening intimacy as the Russian Dostoevsky's version, bringing it to a wider readership for the modern day. Fresh, contemporary and current this...
Published on 27 Dec. 2012 by Lucinda

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hmmmmmmmm
Well, everyone is going to go on about what a classic this is but it didn't do it for me. Too angsty, too insistent. Yeah I know, one of the greats etc etc. Just offering an alternative view.
Published 11 months ago by Amazon Customer


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant translation of one of the world's greatest classics, which is a contemporary masterpiece with a rich heritage., 27 Dec. 2012
This review is from: Crime and Punishment (Kindle Edition)
Crime and Punishment has to be one of the greatest novels ever written, and which is an outstanding, supreme example of fine literature at its very best. This English version still manages to capture the forcefulness and frightening intimacy as the Russian Dostoevsky's version, bringing it to a wider readership for the modern day. Fresh, contemporary and current this wonderful book is a delight to behold and which should be cherished for all-time, as a powerful piece of prose and stirring narrative that is profoundly affecting. Fyodor Dostoevsky s tale is brought realistically to life with such exactness that one cannot help but connect to it, by means of memorable characters and meaningful storytelling.

For those who have vision and the courage to follow it, there is no law and no crime and no punishment, only a revaluation of all values." So declares Rodya Raskolnikov the young Russian intellectual living in ugly poverty. In order to eat, he is forced to pawn precious possessions for a few roubles to the greedy "cockroach", Alyona. If he kills her, Rodya argues, he commits no crime: rather he will rid the world of a "filthy insect", just like one of the cockroaches you are able to envisage being crushed beneath his boots. As Alyona examines Rodya's silver cigarette case, he brings his axe down upon her with the horrifying sound of steel hitting human flesh. Despite this not being a crime, Rodya suffers fearful guilt and inevitable punishment. It is Sonya, the abused young woman forced into prostitution by her drunken father, who holds the power of Rodya's redemption.

Dramatization is a superb vehicle for this tense psychological masterpiece and the performances are powerful (such as the baiting of Rodya by Jim Norton as Petrovich), the police officer who suspects Rodya's guilt, is chilling. Whilst Barnaby Kay skillfully conveys Rodya's duality as his human conscience, breathless with panic, argues with his controlled and truculent intellect transpire.

Dramatic, intense and emotionally moving this noteworthy, inspiring tale in which you can feel such darkness and such passion is truly remarkable. I cannot stress enough the importance of having a good translator, and Constance Garnett has done a most credible job in making this as readable as a modern-day novel in the twentieth century that one is able to understand with decipherable language. Complete with an introduction by Joseph Frank, this has to be the stand-out edition of this masterful work of writing and which I highly recommend above all others (including those published by Penguin). This really is an epic story and one that should be revered and celebrated, for the value and worth of such great classics is beyond measure.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Breathtaking, 21 Feb. 2014
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Crime and Punishment is set in Russia in the 1800's. It is written from the perspective of the protagonist Raskolnikov; a young student. Despite its reputation as being hard going, I found it easy to read and impossible to put down.

Due to financial hardship and circumstance Raskolnikov commits murder. Russia was economically and politically unstable at the time of writing and one of the greatest arguments in favor of socialism is that, if people were equal would crime be eliminated? Would the reason for acting criminally no longer exist? The novel spreads this message, without focusing politics as a major theme. Drawing upon the writings of Marx and Engels, Russia became Communist in 1917 under Lenin, succeeded by Stalin after Lenin's death in 1925.

As the title suggests the crime - one man murdering another and; punishment - the guilt, paranoia, mental deterioration and then incarceration are the major themes, the content of the entire novel. Other plot-lines such as romance take a significant back seat. Love does indeed suffer as a consequence of the crime, part of the punishment I guess.

A tale of love, justice, psychology and suffering; this is a wonderful read, and despite what Willy Mason says, you should read Dostoevsky at your age.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A long haul but worth it, 11 Oct. 2013
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At times appears to be rambling ~ I'm guessing this is due to its time and a certain Russian obsession with the soul ?
The study itself of a pathological mind in conflict with an oversensitivity is classic and at the same time unique.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Speaks to all, 28 Oct. 2012
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This review is from: Crime and Punishment (Kindle Edition)
Whatever the enormity of his crime, Raskolnikov is eaten by a kind of remorse and darkness - the weight of his conscience being his greatest punishment. Yet one of the most moving features is the way in which the sympathy and kindness of a prostitute bring him a measure of escape from the burden of guilt.
The plot does massively meander and, some would say, it drags, but ultimately the build of detail and back story give the book its depth.
C & P has been thought of as intellectually demanding but, after all, it was written for the masses of nineteenth century Russia - even for drunkards and prostitutes, if they cared to read the book. And if they had, I reckon they would have found the same ray of hope in life, even when it seemed at its darkest.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fear and self loathing in C19th Russia, 25 Mar. 2013
By 
Juliet Foster "Life's better in Red" (Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crime and Punishment (Kindle Edition)
Why kill someone? Because you can, of course, and to see if you have what it takes to be above the law. But then what? Well then you meet with your conscience and with the inspiration behind one of TV's greatest detectives, the wonderful Columbo, and we all know what happens then.

The crime is the crime, obvious enough. The punishment is living with the crime as a human being who is not above the law but is at heart above said crime. Dostoyevsky weaves this tale wonderfully of being eaten alive by one's own paranoia and self-loathing; of becoming beneath love even of one's mother so that every day is a torment.

There is a reason why this book is still in print today in myriad languages and translations and that is, with the exception of Macbeth, there is nothing comparable. `Out, damn spot' sprang to mind many times whilst reading and a quick scooch about Google tells me this is a common study theme so far from an original observation!

Crime and Punishment explores the psychology affecting a murderer against the backdrop of Nineteenth Century St Petersburg and the contrasts of wealth and poverty. Dostoyevsky is one of the best at introspective analysis by far although it makes for little in the way of light reading.

You cannot read this and not wonder whether you would act and react in the same way as Raskalnikov. That's not to say it encourages anyone to try it and find out! However it does raise a number of questions in the reading of it, whether you think on them after putting the book down or not.

Some parts of the story seem quite unnecessary though become important later on, so you mustn't skip them. This seems to be a commonality in Russian classics: a certain onus placed upon the reader to pay attention. This is not to everyone's liking, so fair warning before you read!

Crime and Punishment is multi-layered and offers a huge amount of insight on a number of subjects. It's the exam setter's dream of a set text for the sheer amount of exploration that can be done through the eyes of this novel. In my `old' age, I wish it had been a book we studied at school because I'd find any amount to say about it under the heading `discuss'. However, I suspect in my youth I would have disagreed with my older self.

A thought provoking read worth investing the time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hmmmmmmmm, 20 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: Crime and Punishment (Kindle Edition)
Well, everyone is going to go on about what a classic this is but it didn't do it for me. Too angsty, too insistent. Yeah I know, one of the greats etc etc. Just offering an alternative view.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Crime & Punishment, 26 Nov. 2012
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This review is from: Crime and Punishment (Kindle Edition)
An interesting insight into life in Russia in the mid-eighteenth century, written in a similar manner to that of Dickens. Some sections were quite hard work, particularly understanding that characters, nearly all of whom have more that one name.
Some may regard this book a rather long winded, but the Dickensian style paints a wonderful picture, particularly in the latter stages of the book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Russian novel, 6 July 2014
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Brilliant charactarisation, very atmospheric. Quite claustrophobic, though, inside the mind of a mentally disturbed, seriously broke Russian student in the late 19th century. Subtle cat and mouse game with a crafty police officer. We had a paperback edition which fell apart, so hopefully this will be more reliable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glowing report!, 15 Nov. 2013
By 
Mr. A. J. Brown (london) - See all my reviews
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Read this book for two reasons; The FANTASTIC storyline and the greatest peak into the darker elements of the human brain this reader has ever come into contact with in the literature form.It is a book that at times you will want to put down but you actually will find it has you in it's grasp.Superb!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Foreign Literature: One of the great ones, 10 Jun. 2013
By 
Miss M. Chowdhury (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crime and Punishment (Kindle Edition)
If you've read Russian literature before, then you know what I mean when I say that thier language (even when translated) sounds modern and brisk.

The story of Raskolnikov's struggle for food and shelter whilst trying to keep a sain mind is more that what it appears. Social, political and philosophical issues are not far from the surface of the novel and even when some characters went on a tangent about these things, you could only read and wonder. It's a book that makes you think. Can Murder be justified? What responsibility does society take for its people? Is the mind ever valued? What exactly is honour?

By the 2nd chapter I was engrossed and found the langauge to flow and keep me going with its current.

The kindle version was great. Next to no mistakes and well translated.
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