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36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still disturbing.
This film is an intense cinematic experience. It follows four city boys trip into the wild backwoods of rural America for a canoe trip on a river that is shortly to be dammed. What they find there is a lawless place populated by small minded locals and an unforgiving journey down stream. The story, the direction and the acting all come together to produce a film that...
Published on 28 Sep 2007 by U Dick

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Blu Review 8 - Deliverance
Deliverance Blu Ray Review - 31.05.10

Distributor Warner Home Video US - Not region locked.

Did you ever get the urge to go out exploring miles away from home in unfamiliar territories?

If you answered no to the above question, then you have probably seen this movie, which should be enough to put off even the most adventurous among us. If...
Published on 31 May 2010 by Blu Review Obscura


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Deliverance Blu-Ray, 12 Sep 2013
By 
Brf Churchill "BANJOMAN" (ENGLAND) - See all my reviews
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As a Banjo player I like this film for all sorts of reasons! Always getting asked to play Duelling Banjos. And am happy to oblige. Anyway it's a classic Man v the wild with certain notorious scenes which have become (Infamous) Why people always shout squeal like a pig whenever I pick my Banjo is beyond me!!! The Blu-ray transfer is very good, wouldn't say Immaculate say like (Zulu)but it is worthy of a upgrade. The night scene where Jon voight climbing the cliff shows a lot of grain, but the day scenes are stunning. I managed to get a Digi-copy with a very good Informative book from Amazon.com region free, but its the extras that improve this. I don't want to give anything away, but the Duelling Banjo scene is broken down, and you will be surprised how that scene was constructed. Lets say don't believe everything you see on screen. As a Banjo player I was surprised too. Worthy of an upgrade from an old DVD .
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deliverance, 28 Dec 2012
By 
Robert Little (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This is a old film,which we have enjoyed very much to see it again,it is not for younger viewers to see.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brutal, beautiful and brilliant., 20 Jun 2011
By 
Spike Owen "John Rouse Merriott Chard" (Birmingham, England.) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Deliverance [Blu-ray] [1972] [US Import] (Blu-ray)
Four Atlanta friends-Lewis (Burt Reynolds), Ed (John Voight), Bobby (Ned Beatty), and Drew (Ronny Cox) - decide to canoe down the Cahulawassee River out in the Georgia wilderness. They see it as a test of manliness whilst also wanting to experience this part of nature before the whole valley is flooded over to make way for the upcoming construction of a dam and lake. But the perils of nature are not the only dangerous things in their midst, unfriendly wood folk are about to bring another dimension in terror.

Deliverance is one of those films that sometimes suffers by way of reputation. Much like Straw Dogs and 70s films of that type, the hype and promise of unremitting hell often isn't delivered to an expectant modern audience. Which is a shame since Deliverance is one of the finest, glummest, brutalistic and beautiful film's of the 1970s.

Adapting from James Dickey's novel (screenplay duties here also), British director John Boorman crafts a tough and powerful film of men out of their environment, thus out of their league. As each man sets off initially, it's a test of manhood, but each guy is forced to deconstruct their worth, and it soon becomes more about survival as this deadly adventure proceeds. Boorman, aided by cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond, has painted a raw and treacherous landscape, unconquered by city slickers but dwelt in by inbreds who don't take kindly to the city folk showing up with their machismo attitudes. From the first point of contact with the strange locals, where Drew goes "duelling banjos" with an odd looking child, the film doesn't let up, much like the locals themselves, the film also is remorseless. Some critics over the years have proclaimed that Deliverance is too pretty, mistaking lush physicality as something detracting from the dark thematics at work. Not so-the Chattooga River sequences are electrifying, the rapids scenes (brilliantly filmed with Voight and Reynolds doing real work, and getting real injuries) are merely setting up the unmanning of our "macho" guys just around the corner. It's a fabulous and potent piece of "beauty". With the four cast leaders absolutely brilliant in their respective roles. In fact there are few better casting decisions ever than that of Reynolds as Lewis, one can only lament that he didn't have more hard edged serious roles in his career.

Minor itches exist, metaphors are heavy (Vietnam a 70s staple it seems) while ecological concerns are hinted at without being as prominent as they are in the novel. Surveying the landscape during the opening of the piece, Lewis reflects that man is going to rape this land, rape it! It's stuff like that that is not totally formed, giving way to abject horror and survival, with Lewis again noting that survival is the name of the game. Like I say, only minor itches.

Deliverance, a game of life and death where man's primal being means violence may indeed beget violence. Boorman clearly agreed. 10/10
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational!, 19 May 2004
This review is from: Deliverance [1972] [DVD] (DVD)
This film makes me look deep inside myself. Before watching the film my view was, 4 men in a canoe. How the hell will this make a good film?
How i was wrong.
These four men make you realise what friendship and loyalty is all about, fending for each other in times of need and covering each others back no matter what the consiquences.
From a film critics point of view, the sound and pictures don't match at times, but apart from this, some of the shots are tremendous, with the lake shots being truely unbelieveable at times.
How can i go through this review without mentioning the 'Dueling Banjo'? The soundtrack itself is quiet simply magnificent, but the way in which it is shot sets the film up nicely.
Overall i think that this should go towards the top of the classic films of all time.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Blu Review 8 - Deliverance, 31 May 2010
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This review is from: Deliverance [Blu-ray] [1972] [US Import] (Blu-ray)
Deliverance Blu Ray Review - 31.05.10

Distributor Warner Home Video US - Not region locked.

Did you ever get the urge to go out exploring miles away from home in unfamiliar territories?

If you answered no to the above question, then you have probably seen this movie, which should be enough to put off even the most adventurous among us. If you can remember a pretty obscure one time video nasty called Don't go in the Woods Alone, well that's the title that really should have applied to Deliverance, except in this case, they really shouldn't have even got out of the vehicles alone, never mind going anywhere near the woods.

The sheer amount of suspense created in this film, makes it a must see title, but considering that there are little or no special effects and the whole story is mainly character driven, does it actually make for an essential Blu ray release?

First off we are presented with a 1080p 2.4:1 non anamorphic transfer, so people who dislike the thick black bars at the top and bottom of the screen should beware. On a 32" LCD screen the available picture did seem rather slim, although gloriously wide, showing the full intended width of the picture. The actual transfer itself does look somewhat grainy in places, again this either will or won't be an issue depending on your own personal tastes. It does however appear to be free from print damage which is always a good sign, although at some points during the film I did find that the transfer seems a little faded from time to time. Overall the transfer presented here is better than the DVD, but is it a mile away from it? I'm not sure that it is.

The audio for this Blu ray is clear presented in 5.1, although again not in any way spectacular and it did seem to be necessary to turn the volume up quite high which thankfully then did not become distorted.

The Special Features improve this release which includes the 35th anniversary documentary, directors commentary and vintage featurette however these were previously available on the recent special edition DVD release.

With some older titles, you can sometimes really be surprised with how impressive the transfer
or audio presented can be and perhaps it's a case of being slightly over critical considering the age of the film and original elements etc.. but it is nice that when you purchase a Blu ray, the first thing you notice is how much better the transfer looks. Sadly this wasn't the case here as although the print was relatively problem free it just wasn't stunning.

That being said, this release is already a "special edition" so I can't see any new versions materialising any time soon and even if they did, would they actually look any better?
I highly doubt it.

So for fans of the film that want it specifically on Blu ray, try not to expect too much and you should enjoy the presentation. If however you already have the special edition DVD then you may be better to wait for this one to be on special offer before upgrading.

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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars UK DVD specs, 28 Aug 2010
By 
D. Vitale (Rome) - See all my reviews
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Runtime: 105'
Languages: English (DD 5.1), Spanish (DD 1.0), German (DD 1.0), Polish (DD 2.0).
Subs: English, Spanish, German, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Portuguese.
Region: 2, 4, 5.
Aspect ratio: 2.40:1 anamorphic
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It Delivers!, 13 Jan 2014
This review is from: Deliverance [1972] [DVD] (DVD)
Quite simply one of the best films ever made. Even after 40 odd years on, it still
grips you with tension and unlike nowadays, one actually cares about the fate of the characters.
More gruesome than I remembered too! Top drawer acting from all the cast-in particlar Ned Beatty and Ronny Cox.
I hav'nt seen any making of docs, but I'm wondering about the Hillbillies- so authentic surely they were real?
All in All a MUST see film.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Boorman's Stunning `Eco-nightmare', 8 Jan 2014
By 
Keith M - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
The thought of Burt Reynolds playing a teetotalling, 'eco-philosopher' may seem, at first sight, rather unlikely, but in this stunning, atmospheric 1972 film directed by John Boorman (with a screenplay, and based on the book, by James Dickey), Reynolds carries off the role of Lewis Medlock with considerable aplomb (indeed, along with his turn in Paul Thomas Anderson's Boogie Nights, this is the best I've seen from him). Of course, Reynolds is just one of the four 'townies' who, along with Jon Voight's level-headed Ed Gentry, Ned Beatty's (initially) boisterous Bobby Trippe and Ronny Cox's (perhaps overlooked) turn as the quartet's 'conscience', Drew Ballinger, set out in canoes down the Cahulawassee river in 'deepest Georgia', only to find their nemeses in a mix of nature and a group of malevolent 'locals'.

Boorman sets up his (and Dickey's) major theme of mankind's disrespect for the natural world (and its potential for 'hitting back') within the film's first 15 minutes, as we're shown scenes of the dam construction that will spell the end of the Cahulawassee, and the notorious scene of Drew 'duelling' with the banjo of Billy Redden's young 'Hillbilly' Lonnie. This latter scene is one of the truly great moments in cinema, fusing (as it does) the joyous mood of musical virtuosity with the darker themes of the rejection of 'alien interlopers' ('What the hell do you want to f!?! around with that river for?') as Lonnie refuses Ballinger's offer of a handshake. Indeed, this mix constantly recurs throughout Boorman's film as the idyllic setting for the quartet's river trek (with background birdsong abounding) is infused with an increasing sense of menace. A mention should, of course, be made of cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond's work here, which is simply superb - mixing claustrophobic jungle interiors, stunning landscapes and river 'action shots' with some brilliant 'medium distance' shots and slow pans at moments of greater intimacy and (in particular) Deliverance's harrowing violence (and its aftermath).

In addition to Reynold's great turn (admittedly he has many of the film's most telling lines, 'You don't beat this river', 'That's the game - survival', etc), each of Beatty, Voight and Cox deliver increasingly engaging performances. In particular, Cox is brilliant as the group's 'voice of reason', who attempts to retain a sense of 'civility' following the key (and still, over 40 years on, disturbing) scene of Ed and Bobby's humiliating assault at the hands of two malevolent locals. In addition to this brilliantly unsettling scene, Boorman also delivers a number of other standout moments, including that where Ed reveals his natural timidity via his inability to kill a deer.

Deliverance certainly continued Boorman's eclectic film output, and further confirmed (following 1967's Point Blank) that he was comfortable dealing with dark (and often violent) themes. Other films that Deliverance (in parts) remind me of would include Apocalypse Now and Aguirre, Wrath of God (particularly in terms of the sense of other-worldliness), as well as (more directly) Walter Hill's Southern Comfort. And, although the final 30 or so minutes of Boorman's film arguably are a little histrionic and stretch the bounds of credibility, I still think it worth a top rating.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolute classic, 6 Jan 2014
By 
Mr. A. J. Tennant "Metalhead" (Warwickshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Deliverance [1972] [DVD] (DVD)
Deliverance is a 1972 American thriller film produced and directed by John Boorman and starring Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ronny Cox, and Ned Beatty, with both Cox and Beatty making their feature film debuts. The film is based on a 1970 novel of the same name by American author James Dickey, who has a small role in the film as the Sheriff. The screenplay was written by Dickey and an uncredited Boorman.

Widely acclaimed as a landmark picture, the film is noted both for the memorable music scene near the beginning that sets the tone for what lies ahead - a trip into unknown and potentially dangerous territory - and for its notorious "squeal like a pig" male rape scene. In 2008, Deliverance was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

I bought Deliverance on DVD as a Christmas present for my dad who already has the film on VHS, and he was really pleased to have received the DVD at Christmas. I previously saw this film on video a few years ago, and so I watched it again very recently but on DVD this time. I really enjoyed this film the first time I saw it on video, and when watching it again but on DVD it was just as entertaining. A couple of days later I watched the 1981 film Southern Comfort which has similar premises to Deliverance, and is equally good.

Going back to Deliverance, it is a classic film that is not to be missed. Very highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still relevant!, 8 Aug 2013
By 
K. Schoen - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Deliverance [1972] [DVD] (DVD)
A very good movie relevant today exactly the same way it was at the time, maybe even a little bit more.It shows very clearly that civilized persons have no chance to prevail over uncivilzed or in todays world: democracy has no chance against the rabble exactly as we see now in the Middle-East. People who have inhibitions to kill other people will have to succumb to those who don't.
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Deliverance [Blu-ray] [1972] [US Import]
Deliverance [Blu-ray] [1972] [US Import] by John Boorman (Blu-ray - 2007)
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