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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nail-biting up until the end
Suspicion is a Hitchcock thriller about a married couple. The naïve daughter of a wealth retired army general meets a playboy of the higher elite on a hunting party organisation. They quickly get acquainted and decide to marry despite concerns from the girl's family claiming that he is after the money of the family. The husband Johnnie Aysgarth is always living freely...
Published on 10 July 2008 by Ogun Eratalay

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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Region 1 DVD edition is the one to get
One of Hitchcock's great films, sadly let down in this poorly presented UK DVD edition from Universal. The DVD contains both a black and white and a colourised version, and absolutely nothing in the way of extras. The colourised version is hazy and lacks detail, the black and white version is only marginally sharper. A much better edition is the Region 1 DVD released...
Published on 4 Nov 2009 by stickinsect


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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Region 1 DVD edition is the one to get, 4 Nov 2009
By 
stickinsect (Sydney NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Suspicion [DVD] (DVD)
One of Hitchcock's great films, sadly let down in this poorly presented UK DVD edition from Universal. The DVD contains both a black and white and a colourised version, and absolutely nothing in the way of extras. The colourised version is hazy and lacks detail, the black and white version is only marginally sharper. A much better edition is the Region 1 DVD released in 2004 by Warner Brothers. It has superior picture quality and comes with a making of documentary "Before the Fact: Suspicious Hitchock", a theatrical trailer and subtitles in English, French and Spanish. Film 8/10, R2 UK DVD 1/10, R1 US DVD 9/10.
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49 of 53 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 16 Sep 2007
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This review is from: Suspicion [DVD] (DVD)
Sadly the 2007 release is exactly the same as the 2003 DVD -- a (relatively) poor black & white transfer, a pointless colourised version, and no extras.

Much better is the 2004 region 1 US release from Warners, which features an excellent transfer and a 22 minute documentary.

It's a shame Universal UK sees fit to keep on re-releasing the same old transfers (e.g. the current transfer for "Psycho" is the same poor quality one first used for the 1999 DVD release).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nail-biting up until the end, 10 July 2008
Suspicion is a Hitchcock thriller about a married couple. The naïve daughter of a wealth retired army general meets a playboy of the higher elite on a hunting party organisation. They quickly get acquainted and decide to marry despite concerns from the girl's family claiming that he is after the money of the family. The husband Johnnie Aysgarth is always living freely always lively but sometimes he reveals dark spots about his life. First of all he has never worked in his life and is penniless! He has always a friend or two to borrow money from never to pay it back. The newly wedded Lina always tries to dispel bad thoughts from her mind about his vices which include gambling, fraud etc. Events take a turn when she is convinced that he is trying to kill her for her money. She does not trust him a bit so when he insists her to take her to her mother's by his car she is terrorized...The atmosphere of the film is well created, the family is living in a wealthy environment. The film music is well-suited and the usage of the famous Wiener Blut waltz of Johann Strauß is a great choice. Joan Fontaine and Cary Grant act marvellously as well as the notable Cedric Hardwicke (father of Dr.Watson of Jeremy Brett series of Sherlock Holmes, Edward Hardwicke) and the wonderful Dame May Whitty (from The Lady Vanishes). The film sends signals to some future Hitchcock movies. The focus on eye-glasses and the phone index takes me to Strangers on a Train. The usage of brilliant appearance of the word "murder" when playing a board game is a touch of genius also. The film is a classical non-political thriller from the well-known Hitchcock. The film was shot in 1941, an awful year as the world was running towards a deadly end but the American audience needed movies to keep them entertained anyhow...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars poor quality, 4 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Suspicion [DVD] (DVD)
I was disappointed because it was a very poor quality picture and the sound was almost inaudible :-( :-( :-(
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Poor quality of image, 8 July 2005
This review is from: Suspicion [DVD] (DVD)
Poor quality of image in this edition and the low score it is only related to the quality. No much point in the colour version since Suspicion looses its dramatic power in colour.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I Was Afraid You'd Stop Loving Me", 6 Aug 2005
This review is from: Suspicion [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Joan Fontaine was wonderful in this sensitive film about a shy woman who unexpectedly finds love and allows her insecurities to fuel her imagination with suspicion. She easily won the Academy Award for her performance following her fine turn the prior year in Rebecca. Based on a novel by Francis Iles, Hitchcock's second film starring Fontaine is more about love and the fear of losing it than suspense, but still has enough of his little touches to make it enjoyable as both.
Joan Fontaine is the shy but wealthy Lina. Though her head is often buried in books, her heart still beats, and when she is shown a little attention by irresponsible charmer Johnnie Aysgarth (Cary Grant), who calls her monkey-face, she begins to fall in love. When she overhears her family talking about her, it hurts her deeply, and she turns to Johnnie for the romance and adventure both she and those who know her thought she'd never have.
Fontaine is wonderful as she pines for the popular Johnnie to come calling again, until finally a cablegram salvages her pride in front of her skeptical family. Grant is excellent as the off-beat and fun Johnnie. When the shy Lina tells him she loves him, he realizes he feels the same and they run off and get married one rainy night.
Lina tries to be happy but begins to see Johnnie in a different light when his pal Beaky (Nigel Bruce) shows up. Johnnie's gambling and irresponsible ways are off-set by his charm, however, and her faith in him is always restored, as when he buys back a family heirloom he has sold when he hits it big at the track.
Lina learns through the town gossip that not only has Johnnie lost his job, but may have lost it because of theft, and decides to leave him. She is writing her note to him when Johnnie breaks in to tell her the sad news of her father's death. All is forgotten for a time as she needs Johnnie more than ever.
When Johnnie's debts become serious and the sweet but slow Beaky turns up dead, in a manner Johnnie has read about in her friend's mystery novels, her insecurities allow her imagination to take the next step. And when she discovers Johnnie has attempted to borrow against her life insurance policy....
Fontaine is simply marvelous in a tender and subtle performance and Cary Grant gives Johnnie just the right mix of charm and danger. The beautiful romantic score from Franz Waxman was Oscar nominated. Heather Angel has a nice part as the maid Ethel and Auriol Lee lends fine support as the mystery writer friend of Lina. Nigel Bruce, of Sherlock Holmes fame, really shines as Johnnie's pal Beaky.
Though some have a problem with Hitchcock's ending, the sensitive and romantic tone of the film almost demands the ending we get. A very fine romantic film with a touch of suspense.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Umm, ah, umm, ah, umm, ah...oh I dunno, 17 Dec 2008
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This review is from: Suspicion [DVD] (DVD)
This movie was famously all set to be a scorcher but then comes that rushed and false looking ending. I won't say how it does end in case you haven't seen it, as the film is most definitely worth the watch, whatever you may think of the final five minutes, hence the 4 stars from me. Its production values, editing, continuity and flowing narrative are all classical Hitchcock, in other words, bloomin brilliant. There is suspense and mystery all the way through it...what a shame the director didn't get his way with the ending he had intended, as the movie was so carefully constructed with a different conclusion in mind and just looked right for it.

Having said that, the ending we get is no disaster at all and does work as a narrative with all that's gone before - it sort of validates the title as well. It's just that we know this was not the original ending, or the original title, and we can't escape from the feeling of being made a fool of, or even being cheated. This of course was well within Hitchcock's capibility to do if he had so wanted, from the start, and several big films have since pulled similar tricks on purpose. So yes it does work in a way, but the thing should have ended that way with much more conviction than it did. The ending was so flimsily and quickly done that you almost sense a sulky Hitchcock deliberately did this in protest at the studio insisting on 'their' ending. Worth watching for an intriguing story of growing suspicion and fear, bringing a really meaningful performance out of Fontaine. Grant being slippery and not so likeable for once is also a bit of a joy and he seems to like it too.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fontaine bagged the Oscar but it's CARY GRANT who's the ace., 29 Mar 2005
By 
Jeff Markham (Walton-on-Thames, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Suspicion [DVD] (DVD)
Hitch was forced to change the ending of this interesting psychological thriller to appease RKO executives, nervous about a film implying CARY GRANT is a killer. Yet the finished version remains a fascinating case study of how a vulnerable young woman's suspicion grows from doubts based on circumstantial evidence (JOAN FONTAINE in an Oscar-winning performance).
GRANT's portrayal of the reckless, slyly immoral Johnnie Aysgarth is even more notable, a sort of 'dress rehearsal' for the far darker role in the later Hitchcock masterpiece NOTORIOUS (1946).
There's also the classic Hitchcock 'touch' in the wonderful denouement - a superb suspense sequence involving a suspicious glass of milk being carried up a dimly lit staircase: Hitch put a lightbulb inside the glass to enhance the ghostly special effect.
Brilliant, underrated but slightly dated Hitchcock film - playful experimentation and also fascinating to see how 'Hollywood England' looked in 1940 too!!!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Uncertainty is the very essence of Hitchcock's suspense., 19 Nov 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Suspicion [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Joan Fontaine was Oscar-nominated as best actress in the previous year for her much better performance opposite Laurence Olivier in "Rebecca", in a role not dissimilar to that in this typical Hitchcock thriller. That she won the Oscar for this portrayal of Cary Grant's wife who anguishes over the possibility that her new husband may be plotting to kill her says as much for the Academy's penchant at the time for sympathy votes as it does for the talented performances which prevented her winning in 1940. In that year, she lost out to Ginger Rogers' magnificent "Kitty Foyle" and was joined in the also-ran stakes by other memorable turns by Katherine Hepburn for "The Philadelphia Story" and Bette Davis in "The Letter". In 1941, she triumphed ahead of Davis's generally-accepted superior performance in "The Little Foxes", Davis herself having already won the prime accolade twice (for "Dangerous" in 1935 and for "Jezebel" three years later). Thus, she becomes a member of that growing band of performers who have received compensation from the Academy for lesser feats in recognition of more worthy and more-critically acclaimed earlier performances. (In recent years, the example of Paul Newman springs to mind, overlooked for his memorable roles in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof", "The Hustler", "Hud", "Cool Hand Luke", "Absence of Malice" and "The Verdict", but finally rewarded in 1986 for a lower-key but still very effectual turn in "The Color of Money".)
What is perhaps particularly annoying about all this is that, good as her performance is in "Suspicion", Fontaine is not the pivotal focus of the film. That honour must go to Grant for a performance which achieves Hitchcock's objective of prolonging in the viewer the feeling of doubt about his true intentions towards Fontaine, right up to the end of the picture, and thereby enabling the viewer to fully appreciate the conflict of emotions felt by her. Grant was always going to be ideal for the role with his ability to deliver any line of dialogue, whatever the content, whether sincere or fraudulent, endearing or menacing, with that same consistent inimitable style - you can never guess what motives, if any, lie behind his facade, and that uncertainty is the very essence of Hitchcock's suspense and the whole picture.
RKO's front-office boys were uneasy with Hitchcock's original ending and he was forced to re-shoot it before release. However, if the revised denouement does appear to be a cop-out (and I suggest that it does so only to those who are aware on viewing the film that the punch-line had been changed), it matters little as the joy of the picture has in any event been fulfilled by that time.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The excellent performance surpassed my high expectations...as did this film!, 19 Nov 2007
By 
Barry Nevin (Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Suspicion [DVD] (DVD)
Some people are inclined to slate 'Suspicion' as a result of the ending, which is often deemed anticlimactic. I beg to differ: the story is solid, the cast is stellar, the suspense is engaging: for fans of Hitchcock, who could ask for anything more?

Without giving too much of the plot away, Lina Laidlaw (Joan Fontaine) marries penniless Cary Grant (Johnny Aysgarth). Various clues from Johnny convince Lina that he is plotting murder, not only of his friends, but of Lina herself. The climax consists of the original "unsteady drive in a car along a steep cliff" and I maintain that from beginning to end, 'Suspicion' is a true nail-biter (especially during the classic scene where Grant serves her an eerie-looking glass of milk that may or may not be poisoned)! Impressive Hitchcock-ian touches are evident throughout the film and in many respects, this classic includes one of, perhaps, the greatest performances of each of the major stars. Joan Fontaine certainly deserved her Oscar for Best Actress and effectively conveys the many emotions she feels during the film and Cary Grant is sleek (as per usual) but brilliantly conjures an smoothly evil air. In short, go for it!
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Suspicion [DVD]
Suspicion [DVD] by Alfred Hitchcock (DVD - 2007)
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