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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars key book for enterprise patterns
Even if you find enterprise stuff immensely dull, dealing with databases and web pages is a pretty common task, most of the action in software development revolves around it, and who wants to be completely ignorant of the the alphabet soup of various technologies the IT blogs, books and websites are floating in?

So if you must immerse yourself in this area,...
Published on 29 July 2006 by Thing with a hook

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1.0 out of 5 stars I find him a very good writer. however this book was my worst buy
I have bought several of Martin Fowler's other books as well. I find him a very good writer. however this book was my worst buy. Perhaps since at this stage of buying, I wasn't aware that this book is already 12 years old now. I would rather look somewhere else for similar books.
Published 1 month ago by Pete


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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars key book for enterprise patterns, 29 July 2006
Even if you find enterprise stuff immensely dull, dealing with databases and web pages is a pretty common task, most of the action in software development revolves around it, and who wants to be completely ignorant of the the alphabet soup of various technologies the IT blogs, books and websites are floating in?

So if you must immerse yourself in this area, what better than a Martin Fowler book? The code is mainly in Java, with a fairly large smattering of C#. It would probably help if you understood some basics of enterprise development in those languages, e.g. servlets and JDBC for Java.

The patterns in this book cover organising domain logic, database mapping and access, web presentation, concurrency, and the book finishes by covering base patterns, a mixture of lower level abstractions of the sort covered in Fowler's first book Analysis Patterns (e.g. Money) and those that bear a close resemblance to the classic vanilla Gang of Four patterns, with an enterprise twist (e.g. Plugin and Gateway). Nearly all the other patterns refer to these, so I don't know why these didn't appear first. Apart from that though, the book is very well organised. And the opening essay, that discusses the trade offs of every pattern and how they fit together in an application, is immensely helpful.

Wizened enterprisers looking for new material will not find much new here, but surely the point of patterns catalogues are to get down on paper the practices of those same wizened enterprisers, not to strike off in new directions. Therefore, an experienced developer should see this as a way to organise what they already know, and maybe in doing so, reveal some new insights.

A newcomer to enterprise development will definitely get a lot out of this, as the underpinnings to the plethora of modern enterprise applications are laid bare. You're not going to become a Hibernate, Struts or EJB expert from this book, but you should at least have a clue about what problems they're trying to solve.

As usual, Fowler manages to be a model of clarity, while still injecting regular touches of wry humour, quite an achievement given the potentially bone-dry material. If you want to know the basics of enterprise software, start here.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book to simplify life of application architect, 1 Feb 2003
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K. Swietlinski "Krzys" (Seattle, WA) - See all my reviews
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If you are an experienced application architect/designer ... you'll probably learn very little new from this book. All patterns described here have been mentioned somewhere else, and has been used for many years. What you will get though is a common vocabulary and very precise and wonderfully written explanations what each term exactly means.
So how this book is to simplify my life? For every new/replacement developer on the project, instead of many pages long architecture document, I'm handling a 1 page summary that uses patterns names from Martin's book along with the book itself and it works beautifully :)
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must have for serious enterprise/web developers, 12 Feb 2004
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This book is more pragmatic, and therefore useful, than most of the patterns books I have read. I have been building .NET apps using the patterns I have applied in previous J2EE projects (mainly documented in Core J2EE patterns).
However this book builds upon these approaches and has specific advice for both J2EE and .NET systems. I don't think there can be many developers working commerically with either of these technologies who would not find the ideas presented in this book very useful.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good survey, but recent development trends burdons, 27 July 2007
By 
Kasper Graversen "Dr." (Europe) - See all my reviews
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Good book. Covers a lot of ground and gives a good survey of the field. Time is on its back, however. The use of web frameworks such as Struts or Spring, and the use of ORM tools such as Hibernate or JPA makes much of the book "redundant". Such tools although solving a lot of practical problems, also introduces many new ones. Maybe a new edition of the book should cover such ground.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful but J2EE biased, 30 July 2006
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C. Jack "colinjack" (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
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I'm a .NET developer and, since the book advertises the fact that it covers .NET as well as J2EE I had high hopes. By and large it lived up to them but in some places I think it let itself down.

In particular the majority of the code is in Java. I don't mind mentally mapping from Java to C#, however its the differences between the framework libraries that creates the problem as I simply cannot do that mapping.

Despite this the book is OK, if you concentrate on the patterns themselves then your fine but I think Java developers will get far more from it as they're going to learn not just the patterns but details you need to be aware of when applying them.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Authoritive Summary on EA, 24 Feb 2004
What I liked about this book is that it actually covers allot - but only the most important bits about it. Everything you would ever want to know about 3-tier architecture is in this book - if you don't already own it and have an interest in the subject, this is the first book to buy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Save time! Pragmatic, simple and effective, 15 Mar 2006
A very well written and pragmatic book about software architectural patterns.
For all the different approches, defines clearly the context of the solution, and, in a critical and structured way, shows the differences among then.
Is a book about structured and patronized solutions for typical problems in every day life of all programmers. So instead losing precious hours in front of a computer trying to reinvent the wheel, read this book and learn the some of the best practices from some of the best programmers in the world.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Bookshelf Essential, 13 Feb 2003
By 
M. W. Walker (Ottawa, ON) - See all my reviews
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Another bookshelf essential by Martin Fowler. It does for enterprise architecture what the GoF book did for software development in general.
Anyone with a reasonable level of experience will doubtless recognise some of the patterns in this book, but in the same way that the GoF book allowed us to communicate by adding patterns to the developer's vocabulary, this book will further expand the vocabulary used by developers, designers and architects of multi-layered systems.
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5.0 out of 5 stars All Developers should read this, 4 Jun 2009
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With the increasing usage of higher level languages, the importance of design patterns is also increasing and this book is an excellent compendium of the patterns that you need the most.

While there are a lot of patterns here that can be found among those proposed by the Gang of Four or found at Sun's BluePrints website, the explanations of the significance of the pattern and when and where it should be used makes it invaluable to programmers. The patterns covered are almost perfect in that they cover the most commonly used patterns as well as the patterns that can make the biggest difference. It's not perfect though as there are a couple of patterns that you feel were included to make up the numbers ('Money' being the most obvious offender).

Incidentally, it's also a great source for disambiguation of terms too where disparate teams can use terms from this book as a common reference. Very useful when dealing with remote teams.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent descriptions of common architectural patterns, 10 Feb 2013
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Martinn Fowler describes in turn many of the common software architectural patterns using a combination of high-level description, code samples (mostly in Java) and suggestions about when to use and when not to use each pattern. The text of the book is consistent and logical in its presentation with plenty of cross-referencing between the patterns. The book is developer-oriented and focuses on principals more than the detailed implementations.

As the author states, this is not a software cookbook, The book helps the developer to approach architectural problems with a range of concepts and strategies to solve design problems. It describes the architectural frameworks that can be used to implement systems of different sizes. It is a useful reference book too. I expect I will be referring to it a lot when I am looking for ideas.

Only downside was the occasional grammatical error which meant I had to re-read parts of it to understand the text properly. Only a minor issue but surprising in a book of this quality.
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