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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
If you're familiar with Tangerine Dream only as a synthesiser group, specialising in "New Age Ambient" music (as many people think of them), then "Electronic Meditation" will come as something of a shock. This was the embryonic Tangerine Dream's first record release, originally by a very forward-looking (to say nothing of brave) German record label, Ohr. It was recorded in October 1969, a couple of years before even the name Tangerine Dream had been heard in the UK, and some five years before their signing to an upstart record-publisher, Virgin, gave both their own and their record company's careers such a tremendous boost. Bear in mind that 1969 was only five years or so after Robert Moog and David Buchla almost simultaneously released the world's first commercial electronic music synthesisers: such instruments were still rare, expensive, and of fairly limited capabilities back then, and the 'electronic' of the title refers not to the use of any such instrument, but rather to the treatments applied to the sound produced from the standard acoustical instruments--guitars and piano (Edgar Froese), cello and violin (Conrad Schnitzler) and drum-kit and metal sticks (Klaus Schulze)--using an extremely crude electronic effect device, an additator--basically, just a ring modulator as far as I can tell--and the use of Farfisa organ. The music itself is difficult to describe unless you're already familiar with the cult experimental free-form rock that was prevalent across continental Europe (especially Germany) in the late 60s but if you imagine three guys hammering and scraping away and generally torturing their instruments, often with little or no seeming regard for what their fellow group members are doing at the time, then you'll have a pretty fair idea! But don't let that put you off: this is important music which at one time had a huge cult following and it deserves to be heard still. And, who knows, you may even discover that you like it!
Be warned, however, that this disc runs for fewer than 35 minutes. (Hence the paucity of stars!) And it was recorded 'live' in an old warehouse, using less than the highest of fi recording gear, so it has a much lower dynamic range than we're used to hearing these days, and in parts sounds positively muddy. Which was probably intended...
Incidentally, if you do find you like it and want to hear more like it, then you should definitely check out the other early Tangerine Dream albums, "Atem", "Zeit" and "Green Desert", as well as the early musics of Klaus Schulze and other experimental groups of the time, like Amon Dhul and Cosmic Rooster.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 6 May 2009
There is nothing remotely conventional about this, Tangerine Dream's debut album. The fact that it was recorded in a warehouse in Berlin is testament to that.
The band's early music is certainly an acquired taste, and often quite unlistenable. 'Electronic Meditation' is no different in that respect. However, where this album differs from the next couple, especially 'Zeit' is that there is more going on musically.
It may be no more than five jamming sessions caught on tape, but there is a drive to the music that isn't present in a lot of Tangerine Dream's early work.
The music itself is very free form and improvised, especially on 'Genesis' and 'Cold Smoke'.
The band create some spooky atmospheres on 'Journey Through a Burning Brain' and closing track 'Resurrection', and there is some serious guitar histrionics on 'Ashes To Ashes'.
The tunes on 'Electronic Meditation' put me in mind of Pink Floyd at their most experimental. Fans of 'Interstellar Overdrive' and the first part of 'Saucerful Of Secrets' will find much to enjoy here.
Having said all that, one does have to be in the right mood to enjoy an album like this. This is music well off the beaten track, worlds away from the mainstream and utterly tuneless if we're being honest. You won't be kept awake at night trying to get these songs out of your head.
First time listeners should stay away from this one and try 'Ricochet', 'Stratosfear' and 'Force Majeure' instead.
Otherwise it's for completists only, despite the interesting and curious nature of the music.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Lets get one thing straight, Tangerine Dream's Ohr label recordings (1970-1973) represent the most truly experimental phase of their career, none more so than this, their debut LP issued in 1970. With a line-up featuring TD founder Edgar Froese, soon-to-be cosmic icon Klaus Schulze and musical extremist Conrad Schnitzler, TD take no prisoners on an album that veers between avant-garde drone experiments ("Genesis"), and free-form acid rock ("Journey Through A Burning Brain"). The album achieves the kind of 'free-rock' that many British and American bands hinted at but could never deliver as TD utilize guitar, cello, electronics and primitive, tribal-sounding drums to create what was surely the most 'out there' rock album yet issued up to that point. The line-up soon splintered after this album was released, making it a stand-alone classic in the T.D cannon, one of the most iconic issued during a career which would see them embrace electronics and move away from the unique sounds this line-up created. Anyone who thinks that west coast US psychedelia is 'far out' should give this a spin. A must have for extremists who enjoy challenging, boundary-pushing rock music.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
This Cd is far from meditational! - it is a full frontal attack on your senses...this is probably thee Krautrock masterpiece....forget TD's endless sequencing ( well most of it! ) & enter a world of underground psychedelic mayhem that was 1969 Berlin. This release captures the 3 original members ( Schulze/Froese/Schnitzler ) at their craziest anarchic free form freak out! I cannot reccomend this CD enough ...... go grab a copy today I think you'll be very pleasently suprised!
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If you're familiar with Tangerine Dream only as a synthesiser group, specialising in "New Age Ambient" music (as many people think of them), then "Electronic Meditation" will come as something of a shock. This was the embryonic Tangerine Dream's first record release, originally by a very forward-looking (to say nothing of brave) German record label, Ohr. It was recorded in October 1969, a couple of years before even the name Tangerine Dream had been heard in the UK, and some five years before their signing to an upstart record-publisher, Virgin, gave both their own and their record company's careers such a tremendous boost. Bear in mind that 1969 was only five years or so after Robert Moog and David Buchla almost simultaneously released the world's first commercial electronic music synthesisers: such instruments were still rare, expensive, and of fairly limited capabilities back then, and the 'electronic' of the title refers not to the use of any such instrument, but rather to the treatments applied to the sound produced from the standard acoustical instruments--guitars and piano (Edgar Froese), cello and violin (Conrad Schnitzler) and drum-kit and metal sticks (Klaus Schulze)--using an extremely crude electronic effect device, an additator (basically, just a ring modulator as far as I can tell) and the use of Farfisa organ. The music itself is difficult to describe unless you're already familiar with the cult experimental free-form rock that was prevalent across continental Europe (especially Germany) in the late 60s but if you imagine three guys hammering and scraping away and generally torturing their instruments, often with little or no seeming regard for what their fellow group members are doing at the time, then you'll have a pretty fair idea! But don't let that put you off: this is important music which at one time had a huge cult following and it deserves to be heard still. And, who knows, you may even discover that you like it!

Be warned, however, that this disc runs for fewer than 35 minutes. (Hence the paucity of stars!) And it was recorded 'live' in an old warehouse, using less than the highest of fi recording gear, so it has a much lower dynamic range than we're used to hearing these days, and in parts sounds positively muddy. Which was probably intended...

Incidentally, if you do find you like it and want to hear more like it, then you should definitely check out the other early Tangerine Dream albums, "Atem", "Zeit" and "Green Desert", as well as the early musics of Klaus Schulze and other experimental groups of the time, like Amon Dhul and Cosmic Rooster. Or you may prefer to explore the more up-to-date approach to experimental electronic music-making, by investigating the many treasures available from Centaur Records and the Consortium to Distribute Computer Music releases, or the electroacoustic masterpieces on offer from Diffusion i Media. Amazon don't seem to stock these (shame!) so you'll need to send your favourite web-searcher off to look for CDCM in Texas, and electrocd.com in Quebec, though.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 10 November 2002
I was interested to find out about the roots of Tangerine Dream and thus purchased this album to find out where electronic music in fact originated from. This album is far from the smooth E-music we know from the seventies and eighties, it is raw sometimes atonal, chaotic and lacks the "fine grain" and dynamic range that makes this music style so fascinating. The most typical of this album, and some will consider this an advantage others a disadvantage, is that two "founding fathers" of modern electronic music are found on this album playing another instrument than the one for which they are renowned: Edgar Froese on guitar and Klaus Schulze on drums and percussion.
At first I was dissapointed about this album but, after giving it some time to settle in I've come to appreciate it. One might look at it as a historical record featuring two of the most productive "E-Musiker" in their young and experimental years.
This is not an album for first time Tangerine Dream listeners ! If you want to know if Tangerine Dream is what you like start at "Pheadra" and work your way through "Rubycon", "Ricochet", "Stratosphear", "Zeit" and "Atem" before attempting this album. But for true TD-(or Klaus Schulze) fans it's a must have !!
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
`Electronic Meditation' is often disowned by it's participants as `not being intended for release' and other such nonsense (although as Edgar Froese freely admits, he was more than happy to take the money!). This recording came at the end of two or more years of Tangerine Dream Mk I, although as Andy King's meticulously researched sleeve notes will tell you there had been a fair number of passing members of the band even by this point. The line-up who recorded Electronic Meditation would itself be a one off, featuring the mighty trio of Edgar Froese, a young Klaus Schulze and the more senior Conrad Schnitzler.

The album title is slightly misleading, and is somewhat at odds with the music, which is very characteristic of the `freak out' scene of the psychedelic clubs of the time. Schulze is the hyperactive drummer walloping his toms for all they are worth while Froese's wild guitar takes off on wings of fuzz and distortion. Elsewhere there are very obvious `Saucerful Of Secrets' Floydian organ chords creating a churchy atmosphere. The wild card is Schnitzler, who utilises all manner of frightful objects to interject with creaks, groans and unearthly shudders...

Somehow the album works better than it should. It is very cleanly recorded, and with very good separation on the instruments. The album works incredibly well as a snapshot of all of those legendary nights at the Zodiak and tales of 24 hour concerts in small rooms at deafening volume. It is by no means the Tangerine Dream the world knows as purveyors of sophisticated electronica, but a raw reminder of how the German scene developed in the late 60's and early '70's.

This new edition from Reactive is immaculately remastered and features a wealth of new archive material and very detailed biographical information, although no-one seems quite able to recall exactly where it was recorded ! Lost in the mists of time.....
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on 29 September 2001
If the name 'Tangerine Dream' brings to mind long lush sequencer led tracks, haunting melodies etc then think again. This is not like any other of their albums. Guitars,organs,drums,cellos, backward tape effects etc feature here. If you have heard 'Wahn' then this is where it came from! In the same mould as Pink Floyd's 'A Saucerful of Secrets' Chaotic stuff but after a few listens it does become bearable.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 29 November 2009
After reading the other reviews,I felt that I should add my own opinion as it differs greatly from the others.I bought this album in 1974 after hearing Phaedra and it blew me away!From the dark,menacing cello and organ drones,to the heavy percussion and distorted guitars,this album is an essential piece of avant-garde rock from the Berlin scene that also spawned bands such as Ash Ra Tempel and Agitation Free.If you like your music soft and cosy,this isn't for you.It's scary,it's disturbing,and it's the most exciting album that Tangerine Dream ever made.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 27 November 1999
If you're familiar with Tangerine Dream only as a synthesiser group, specialising in "New Age Ambient" music (as many people think of them), then "Electronic Meditation" will come as something of a shock. This was the embryonic Tangerine Dream's first record release, originally by a very forward-looking (to say nothing of brave) German record label, Ohr. It was recorded in October 1969, a couple of years before even the name Tangerine Dream had been heard in the UK, and some five years before their signing to an upstart record-publisher, Virgin, gave both their own and their record company's careers such a tremendous boost. Bear in mind that 1969 was only five years or so after Robert Moog and David Buchla almost simultaneously released the world's first commercial electronic music synthesisers: such instruments were still rare, expensive, and of fairly limited capabilities back then, and the 'electronic' of the title refers not to the use of any such instrument, but rather to the treatments applied to the sound produced from the standard acoustical instruments--guitars and piano (Edgar Froese), cello and violin (Conrad Schnitzler) and drum-kit and metal sticks (Klaus Schulze)--using an extremely crude electronic effect device, an additator--basically, just a ring modulator as far as I can tell--and the use of Farfisa organ. The music itself is difficult to describe unless you're already familiar with the cult experimental free-form rock that was prevalent across continental Europe (especially Germany) in the late 60s but if you imagine three guys hammering and scraping away and generally torturing their instruments, often with little or no seeming regard for what their fellow group members are doing at the time, then you'll have a pretty fair idea! But don't let that put you off: this is important music which at one time had a huge cult following and it deserves to be heard still. And, who knows, you may even discover that you like it!
Be warned, however, that this disc runs for fewer than 35 minutes. (Hence the paucity of stars!) And it was recorded 'live' in an old warehouse, using less than the highest of fi recording gear, so it has a much lower dynamic range than we're used to hearing these days, and in parts sounds positively muddy. Which was probably intended...
Incidentally, if you do find you like it and want to hear more like it, then you should definitely check out the other early Tangerine Dream albums, "Atem", "Zeit" and "Green Desert", as well as the early musics of Klaus Schulze and other experimental groups of the time, like Amon Dhul and Cosmic Rooster. Or you may prefer to explore the more up-to-date approach to experimental electronic music-making, by investigating the many treasures available from Centaur Records and the Consortium to Distribute Computer Music releases, or the electroacoustic masterpieces on offer from Diffusion i Media. Amazon don't seem to stock these (shame!) so you'll need to send your favourite web-searcher off to look for CDCM in Texas, and DiM in Quebec, though.
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