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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite science-fiction books.
Voyage of the Star Wolf has been with me since I was a child; I believe my father originally purchased it due to David Gerrold's association with Star Trek, but frankly, the two are worlds apart. Star Wolf is often known as "Star Trek done right," and on the face of it, the comparison may seem warranted, but I'd argue that that is unfair to the world Gerrold created here...
Published on 29 May 2012 by James Stewart

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3.0 out of 5 stars Passable Space Opera, Cardboard Crew
This is the story of the disastrous first mission of the star ship LS-1187 and its long limp home to an ungrateful reception and refit. The second mission is equally fraught with disaster.

The book is of historical interest to Star Trek fans because of its author's major influence on the Star Trek: The Next Generation television series. Its cleverly named...
Published on 3 Jun 2011 by John M. Ford


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite science-fiction books., 29 May 2012
By 
James Stewart "Satoshi Tajiri" (Wemyss Bay, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Voyage of the Star Wolf has been with me since I was a child; I believe my father originally purchased it due to David Gerrold's association with Star Trek, but frankly, the two are worlds apart. Star Wolf is often known as "Star Trek done right," and on the face of it, the comparison may seem warranted, but I'd argue that that is unfair to the world Gerrold created here. So much depth and detail has gone into keeping the setting plausible, whereas Star Trek is really "out there" in terms of its science; the characters here are much more believable, and not larger-than-life "hero" types; the enemies, the genetically-enhanced Morthans, while bearing a passing similarity to Klingons, are much more frightening than they ever were (and as such, are kept in the background as much as possible, so as not to ruin their mystique).

Korie has become one of my favourite science-fiction characters; constantly at odds with himself, and those around him, as he tries to be the perfect commander (not that there is such a thing). Fate constantly screws with him, yet despite everything, he gets a measure of triumph in the end. His every feeling is written clearly, and never once did I feel that anything was forced. One criticism I read involved not knowing Korie had a family until almost a third of the way into the novel; this, I feel, was actually a masterful touch: up until now, we haven't seen the commander as anything more than a martinet, but then, suddenly and horrifically, we see that he's human, and that he can break under enormous pressure.

It's a truly thrilling novel, and all discerning science-fiction fans ought to have this and its two sequels - Middle of Nowhere, Blood and Fire - in their collections. Maybe, if we're lucky, and the War Against the Chtorr is dealt with, we'll even see a third sequel, returning us to the Morthans.
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5.0 out of 5 stars So impressed at Starwolf, 17 Oct 2013
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I picked this up after hearing about the Starwolf kickstarter campaign.
What can I say? The characters leap off the page and are well drawn and have realistic dialogue. I found myself wanting to read it all in one sitting, but being disappointed that the story had to end! A good sign in my book.
There is enough hard sci-fi to satisfy hardcore sci-fi fans. The description helps imagine the scenarios, and reasonable explanations are given for how things work. The plot was very good, and not predictable or linear.
A minor point maybe but I liked how there was an admittedly ugly character in the novel as well. A refreshing change from American TV sci-fi with good looking women all of the time! This was a lot more realistic. The pace was gripping and didn't let up. I am already looking forward to the next novel in the series.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Lightweight, but intelligently so, 1 Aug 2013
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No ground-breaking new setting, new philosophy, or new characters, but the slight changes from the clichés are reasonable, and the background is internally self-consistent. The overall "theme" is one of looking at styles of leadership, with some explicit examination of the problem by the characters, and some examination by demonstration.

The technical background is the subject of a number of short "info-dumps" addressed to the reader, but they're short enough and clear enough that this isn't a problem.

There's effectively two parts to the book - the initial disaster and the journey home, and then the next mission, under new command. The second part introduces new characters, a look at the enemy psychology, and an interesting multi-layered puzzle of bluff, double-bluff, triple bluff, and possibly up to duodecuple bluff or more - I lost track, and so did most of the characters.

Some of the characters have depth, others are only there for others to react to, and one pairing is clearly only there as light-weight filler and relief from the heavier issues elsewhere. But in a short book, there's a limit to how many characters you want in centre stage, and I'd say this was about right.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Passable Space Opera, Cardboard Crew, 3 Jun 2011
By 
John M. Ford "johnDC" (near DC, MD USA) - See all my reviews
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This is the story of the disastrous first mission of the star ship LS-1187 and its long limp home to an ungrateful reception and refit. The second mission is equally fraught with disaster.

The book is of historical interest to Star Trek fans because of its author's major influence on the Star Trek: The Next Generation television series. Its cleverly named "Morethan" bad guys closely resemble Star Trek Klingons. There is even an offsides Morethan security officer serving aboard the LS-1187, stoically enduring the prejudices of his crewmates. He comes off a little tougher than TNG's Lieutenant Whorf, although the overall resemblance is very close.

The characters were disappointingly shallow, especially for a book praised for its psychological complexity. The most painful example came when one character flew into a multi-chapter rage and depression over the deaths of his family. The readers had been through half the book with him by this point and this was the first indication he even had a family. One officer recommends that he handle his personal issues in the privacy of his cabin. We might have greater empathy for this character if we had occasionally seen him in his cabin, writing to his family or looking at their pictures. Or doing anything.

I wanted to like this book more than I did, especially after reading The Man Who Folded Himself. It was enjoyable, but mostly for the historical connection to Star Trek. I do plan to read the sequels, The Middle of Nowhere and Blood and Fire, for similar reasons. But they aren't as high on my list as they were, sad to say.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bland., 12 Dec 2005
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Raul Leite (Lisbon, Portugal) - See all my reviews
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This book reads quite fast, managed to finish it in two days (about five hours total), and despite the interesting setting Mr. Gerrold plants us, the story focuses on a single space ship (the Star Wolf, duh!), in a single area of the Galaxy... Naturaly, it would need more pages to develop and expound on the whole setting, but in the end, it is lacking, with cliché'd characters, sequences, and technology (the only imaginative part is the outcome of a missile attack in the first dozen pages, where the ship looses all power). I didn't cared for any of the characters, or what would become of them, and despite a few singular occasions (the previously stated missile attack, or having telepaths aboard a ship when one of them has intercorse (which is totally unnecessary for the story, I might add))), there was nothing that we haven't seen in a million other stories, some of them much better written... This was to be made into a sci-fi show (got axed in the meantime), and I would surely appreciate it, but as it stands in book form, it's short, uncaring, and bland. It manages to stay above 2 stars by a few sequences and the easy read.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Military SF with intelligence and humanity, 20 May 2003
By A Customer
David Gerrold is one of the greats. This space adventure combines brilliant action with thoughtful characterization. Wonderful!
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VOYAGE OF THE STAR WOLF
VOYAGE OF THE STAR WOLF by David Gerrold (Hardcover - 1990)
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