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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars TIPPING THE SCALES OF POWER WITH YOUR KNIFE
This is on of the most anticipated games to be ported to PCs. For this, the Director's Cut edition was produced, adding some content over the console versions (mostly rooftop action missions), and care was taken to make the gamepad to keyboard/mouse-transition as seamless as possible. For the most part it was successful.

This is a TREMENDOUSLY BEAUTIFULLY GAME...
Published on 13 April 2008 by NeuroSplicer

versus
31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not brilliant
Ok first off i've played the pc version and with DX10 and its stunning....no arguments there!!Its partly being sold as a stealth game but it's really not.As you go up through the levels more skills and equipment become avaliable to you which makes killing your enemies even easier than it was in the first place.That being said means the game actually gets easier the the...
Published on 8 April 2008 by I. Hirst


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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars TIPPING THE SCALES OF POWER WITH YOUR KNIFE, 13 April 2008
By 
NeuroSplicer (Freeside, in geosynchronous orbit) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
This is on of the most anticipated games to be ported to PCs. For this, the Director's Cut edition was produced, adding some content over the console versions (mostly rooftop action missions), and care was taken to make the gamepad to keyboard/mouse-transition as seamless as possible. For the most part it was successful.

This is a TREMENDOUSLY BEAUTIFULLY GAME. The first thing that grabs you is how REAL the city environments feel. The graphics are just OUT OF THIS WORLD! You will need a very good PC to enjoy their full potential (minimum requirements provided below), but real skies, dynamic shadows, facial expressions and realistically flowing robes are only beginning to describe it! Run on a roof and the other citizens will gather around and comment on your crazy behavior! Throw someone on a vendor's cart and he will come after you complaining about his ruined produce! And the city is alive well beyond your character. If only BIOWARE could take some lessons for its next BALDUR's GATE...

Adding to this is the wonderful sound! From the crowd murmurs and the NTCs cries for help, to the whistling of the wind and the well-chosen background music, a good sound-card and speakers set is recommended to truly enjoy this game. If you have a 5.1 speaker system (I do not) I can imagine the experience to become even more immersing.

As to the gameplay, you control Alta´r ibn La-Ahad ("The Flying One, Son of None"). He is a member of the Assassin Brotherhood that sides, well, with both...sides, during the 3rd Crusade. In a story twist, he is also your ancestor, the game being your/his flashback memories. This is a twist I could do without, but I would guess it lays groundwork for the sequels.

The Third person perspective works beautifully and will never loose your interest. Most missions require sneaking and murdering in the shadows. Others will have you eavesdropping for passwords or pickpocketing documents to gain access into target buildings. Some will have you sharpen those sword skills. Still, the game does not avoid its share of stupid "keep this...suicidal character from getting killed" missions. Keep in mind though that ASSASSIN's CREED is rather a strategically thinking action TPS, not a hack&slash fast-paced one.

Controlling your character with a keyboard/mouse takes a lot of getting used to as you have to manage running, climbing, fighting as well as modifying your actions from low to high visibility. The keys are remapable but their complexity will never let you forget you are playing a game. Now for some bad news.

These are the official MINIMUM Requirements:
* Pentium D 2.6GHz (YES, Dual Core!) (or AMD equivalent)
* 1GB RAM (WinXP) or 2GB (WinVISTA) (3GB RECOMMENDED!)
* nVidia 6800 (or Shader Model 3.0 compliant or ATI equivalent)
* Dual-Layer DVD-ROM (or BluRay disc)
* 12GB HDD Space (although my install folder was no larger than 7GB)

As one can see, this is worse than CRYSIS! What I cannot get is how on earth ASSASSIN works on only 512MB of RAM of the XBox, yet it is recommended to have...3GB of RAM on a PC! Sure, the extra content is nice but who did the porting, unpaid interns? Has ANY PC optimization been attempted at all?
Keep also in mind that (as with CRYSIS) in order to fully enjoy the game, barely meeting the minimum requirements means you will barely experience the game. I refuse to deal with WinVISTA so, obviously, this review pertains to DirectX-9. The game is also DirectX-10 compatible, something I cannot comment on though. And now for some good news.

UBISOFT has been recently hit with a $5million class-action suit for hardware (OK, "allegedly") damaged by StarForce bundled with its games. Since, they have announced to be abandoning its StarForce partnership - so let's all rejoice: unlike other UBISOFT games, ASSASSIN's CREED does NOT sport StarForce! Instead, a much milder SafeDisc is used.
It is a pity it took litigation to finally listen to their own customers (suing StarForce would make much more sense, but try finding them in Russia!), but let's count our blessings.

So, overall, this is a well made and beautiful, immersing (although quite short) game that needed more work in PC optimization (wher it lost 1 star Overall) and character control (where it lost 1 star for Fun).

As Altair himself would have put it: "Nothing is true. Everything is permitted."
Well, not everything - and certainly NOT StarForce.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not brilliant, 8 April 2008
By 
I. Hirst (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
Ok first off i've played the pc version and with DX10 and its stunning....no arguments there!!Its partly being sold as a stealth game but it's really not.As you go up through the levels more skills and equipment become avaliable to you which makes killing your enemies even easier than it was in the first place.That being said means the game actually gets easier the the further you get into it.
The cut scenes are a pain in the rear,they can be long and there is no way to skip them,making a second play through of the game a bit of a chore.
Now the up side,visually gorgeous and once you get the hang of the fighting controls it's really fun.
If they ever did a sequal to this they need to turn it into a proper stealth assassination game.Also the character is just crying out for a bow and arrow weapon and would really put a good twist on things.
On the whole it's a good game but i'd wait for the price of to come down before you run out and buy it.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Some achievement..., 15 April 2008
By 
ry19 (London, UK) - See all my reviews
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
Having played a console version of Assassin's Creed, I have to say that the PC version is definitive - provided your computer's specifications are up to the job. The additional tasks that have been programmed in during the lengthy hiatus between the game's original launch and its PC debut make a fair difference (and justify the delay) and I prefer the PC's mouse/keyboard control layout, but for me it's the sheer visual brilliance of the game that tips the balance.

It's been said before, but AC has to represent the pinnacle of achievement in game graphics to date - even Crysis can't match the realism and downright gorgeousness of the environments (at max settings, at least). It does beat the console versions in this regard - and for the reasons I set out below, that for me makes this the best of the versions.

It is true that the gameplay can become a little repetitive at times - there isn't the depth or scope for different activities of, say, the Grand Theft Auto series - but I haven't been as impressed by a game for a long time. When I first started, I was quite happy just wandering the Kingdom (which links the cities where the main action occurs) exploring and climbing towers and buildings to enjoy the views. Sometimes you'll think you're playing a movie - it's like virtual tourism!

However, I appreciate this isn't the be-all and end-all of gaming - hence the lower rating for fun. AC is best played slowly in order to appreciate the world portrayed. Ignoring the backdrop and dashing through the storyline (which involves a somewhat perplexing sci-fi element, as your character is an avatar controlled by a present day descendant hooked up to a bizarre computer) will leave a feeling of, "Is that it?" Even with the PC's extra tasks and missions, it's still a case of repeating the same core steps until you reach the end, which is a little disappointing. It's also quite easy, as holding one key or mouse button down is generally enough to get you round all the fights and all the free-running across rooftops. At its heart it's a good enough game, but not a world-beater. It might seem a little unfair, and I mean this in the nicest possible way, but AC is basically the greatest interactive tech demo ever. For me that makes it a worthwhile purchase, but it's fair to say not everyone will agree.

My not exactly bang up to date key components (runs smoothly at max settings at 1280x1024):-

Core2Duo E6600
2GB DDR2 667
GeForce 8800GT 512MB
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best Crusades game so far!, 12 Sep 2009
By 
Griesmayer (Wien, Ísterreich) - See all my reviews
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
Ubisoft's 2007 game Assassin's Creed is a game that has received mixed critics since its release: while some lauded the game for the great atmosphere, stunning visuals and refreshing gameplay (compared to most other games in the industry), it was critiqued by others for having too repetitive missions, in that you keep doing the same thing over and over again nine times in a row. This review is based on the PC version of Assassin's Creed, which is also the Director's Cut of the game. It came out later than the console versions did, so the developers at Ubisoft had some time to incorporate some additional content into the game. They addressed the main issue of the game, being its repetitive missions, and thus added more challenges: rooftop race, archer stealth assassination, merchant stand destruction and escorting assassins safely from one area to another, doubling the amount of investigations to eight in total.

Surprisingly, upon installing the game, I noticed that it does not have a product key. Very strange indeed, what with most, if not all computer games having one these days as a method to combat piracy. The game automatically searches for patches and installs these upon launch. Assassin's Creed is forced widescreen, which means that if you do not possess a widescreen (16:9) monitor, you will be playing the game with black bars on top and bottom, just like Gears of War.

STORY:

The story takes place in 2012 and 1191, respectively. Desmond Miles, a bartender who has been kidnapped by Abstergo Industries, wakes up in the Animus, an advanced machine that is capable of projecting the memories of ancestors which are supposedly stored in the individual's DNA to the subject's mind, enabling him or her to virtually control his or her ancestor in a dreamlike state. The memory Desmond's kidnappers want to access is however only decoded if other memories before it are played through and thus, Desmond comes to experience the life of his ancestor, a Hashshashin named Alta´r Ibn-La'Ahad in the months of July, August and September of the year 1191, during which he assassinates nine important figures of both Christian and Saracen factions to restore peace in the Holy Land - which is the creed of the Assassins and the goal of his mentor Al Mualim, who is the leader of the Hashshashin sect operating from Masyaf. As you play through the game, you uncover more and more secrets of both the Holy Land and Abstergo Industries, lifting the veil of something that is rooted far deeper in the depths of history than ''what you would find in an online encyclopedia'', as quoted by Dr. Warren Vidic. Without delving deeper into the game's plot, I would like to say that the game leaves the player with many questions, most of which are discussed and explained thoroughly if you do some research on the internet.

GAMEPLAY:

One thing is for sure - the creators of Assassin's Creed aimed for realism while developing the game, by trying to create a virtual Holy Land of the late 12th century. On first glance, their work looks very impressive. With the exception of the GTA series, the cities featured in Assassin's Creed are HUGE for video game standards and look marvelous, with hundreds of citizens in historic clothing moving about, many of them talking to merchants in bazaars or holding speeches to stir up the crowds. Guards patrol the districts and the cities not only look realistic and confusing with their many alleys, but every highly detailed building is climbable by Alta´r, thanks to many nooks and crannies they posess, along with an assortment of ledges and footholds. Unfortunately, it is always day. Since this game is not an RPG, you also do not get the opportunity to interact with the common folk or purchase something from the market (see Oblivion). Also, I found it quite unrealistic that you could - in the middle of a crowd - assassinate any town guard who is walking by in low-profile mode and nobody would scream even when he dropped dead. Often (especially after having rescued a damsel in distress from a bunch of guards), you stand amidst a heap of corpses - while it is true that the crowd panicks and flees when the fighting begins, they soon return after you're done killing the guards, and walk amidst the corpses as if nothing has happened. Another thing: guards respawn, so there is no point in trying to kill as many guards in low profile mode as possible to ease an upcoming character assassination (and the fleeing that automatically ensues afterward). Also, did I mention that corpses disappear after a short while? Very realistic indeed. And the fact that your horse is invincible (it just falls to the ground and then gets up again) also contributes to the loss of immersion. Alta´r cannot swim and the Saracens in the game are represented by Turks - not only through the language, but through the flags as well. Surprisingly, many Templars also speak Turkish instead of what they are supposed to speak in the game - German (although in reality they are supposed to speak French).

CONCLUSION:

The gameplay in the Director's Cut is not as repetitive as that of the standard version. New districts of each of the major cities are unlocked as you progress, so there's always something new to explore. You also have twice the amount of investigations, and there's no need to do all of them to proceed to the assassination event - you can always go ahead and get your hands bloody. For those of us who like the gameplay, the developers hid many flags of different factions that can be collected, as well as templars who need to be eliminated, giving you some extra hours of gameplay. You can also reveal 100% of the map by scaling all towers and getting a breathtaking bird's eye view of the landscape. Overall, the presentation of Assassin's Creed is very nice and even if there are things the developers could improve on, this game is a must-buy for all those who are interested in this time period and a recommendation to everyone else. A well deserved four out of five stars.

One more thing:
Multisampling (Anti-aliasing) is turned off by default at resolutions higher than 1680 x 1050. To force it on, just change multisampling=0 to multisampling=2 in the Assassin' Creed configuration file (.cfg) found in your savegames directory:

(C:\Users\[[USERNAME]]\AppData\Roaming\Ubisoft\Assassin's Creed)

0 for 0xAA
1 for 2xAA
2 for 4xAA
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could be better, 9 Jun 2009
By 
C. Herbert (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
this game is pretty good fun overall, if a little repetitive. the extra missions added in the directors cut edition do alleviate this somewhat. also the game does take forever and a day to exit.
overall, i'd recommend that you play the game, it is good fun despite its pitfalls. hopefully assassin's creed 2 will address these issues.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good game, but just a game, 5 Jun 2009
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
The game is well entertaining and visualy impresive. The most stunning sword fighting scenes I've ever seen in a game. And a fun riding a horse.

But...

It's quite monotonous, very easy and no thinking game. It's clear it's not a PC game but converted from PS or Xbox. You can act like a quiet assasin, but it's only acting as the game doesn't involve you to do that (often you can march like a terminator and kill all the opponents). Producer's description "plan your moves" is well exagerated, as the plot is very strightforward and kind of railway type - all you need to do is to follow it and no chances for your own creativity.

Good to play, I'm glad I bought it, but don't feel like playing again and will probably resale.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad but could of been better, 4 Dec 2008
By 
Jason Prudhoe (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
you play a character called Altair who was a master assassin, striped of his rank and stabbed for his betrayl for exposing the secretive guild to the english army shortly after its defeat, you awaken from inside a machine called the animus which activates certain genetic memories that has been repressed over the years and makes you live what your ancestors did and saw, you real character was an assassin but left and became a bar worker, you have been kidnapped for information on several devices that have been spread over the world that contains information critical to another guild. soon enough you kill 9 people that in our real world died of unknown causes in the holy land some thousand or so years ago. you also see betrayl from 2 characters both in real world and in the memories afterwards.

the storyline aside, the 2 stars for fun is the repetitive nature of the game, it's always collect information before killing the person in question who are some how affiliated with the other guild. killing guards, helping citizens for help later on after your assassination attempt. which is always the same motto throughout the game, until the last few you have to kill, but basically having to kill someone or something before the boss person. climbing up buildings to get a view of the area your in, in question and your not allowed to explore certain places until you completed your mission. their are a few bugs of note which you will encounter including one in acre near the docks where you need an overview, there is a hay bail below, but strangely that tower jump was not configured properly and you will land next to it on the floor next the hay bail and dead, for an example.

the overall game got 3 stars, the graphics aside it's not worth your time and patience and money. your better off playing the old thief games, 1 and 2 as they provide better for assassination attempts from around the same era with exception to the strange magically lights and lamps throughout the city.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The boredom factor, 9 Aug 2008
By 
Mr. T. Belcher (Doitwich Spa UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
I fully agree with a previous reviewer. The game get harder as you progress. Lot's of annoying impediments to your main task. But is it perhaps the boredom factor creeping in. It seem's to throw everything at you in the first 2 missions and then it's the same again, but more frustrating. Unlike games like MoH, CoD, NOLF, etc where each episode is in a different environment AC puts you in exactly the same environment with identical NPC's, and identical tasks.

Buy it cheap and be prepared for only a limited amount of enjoyment.

Graphically it is excellent. But the gameplay is really repetitve.
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the best and worst, 10 May 2008
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
Once upon a time a crack team of developers spent 50 years researching in the middle east before perfecting a believable world with cool animation, sound and the best level design ever.

Suddenly the production manager realised he hadn't bothered to commision a story!?! The game was due for release in one week! How had that been forgotten when 6 generations of families had died slaving on the graphic stuff?! Quickly he scribbled some psuedo Dan Brown conspiracy rubbish on the back of a napkin and thought of 9 unimaginative missions to send the protagonist on, hoping no one would notice cos the art was so slick...
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Only one gripe:, 23 Feb 2009
By 
Mr. R. J. Cronshaw (York, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Assassin's Creed: Director's Cut Edition (PC) (Video Game)
Okay, having owned and played Assassin's for a few months now, I can safely say that I personally have only one problem with it;

UNSKIPPABLE CUTSCENES!

No need to say more than that this game has SO MUCH TALKING that it is only put to shame by the verbal diaorhhea of Metal Gear Solid 4.

However, I see no problem with the controls... I grasped them quickly enough and I found them rather intuitive. Far easier than the console version which I tried at a friend's house... (That might just be because I'm a PC gamer through and through)

The graphical detail is SUPERB. I understand issues with jumpiness that people may have, but if you look closely... I mean VERY closely... during some cutscenes, you will notice that this game could possibly have some of the best graphics available today.. NOT KIDDING! (But remember to look VERY closesly to spot the minor details)

Therefore, I heartily recommend this game to all - as long as you are prepared to sit through some pretty long cutscenes!
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