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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Antonioni at the top of his game?
Antonioni's films are very definitely not everybody's cup of tea. But they are extremely rewarding if you take the time to appreciate their lack of pace, which succeeds in developing dramatic tension. I'd agree with the other review, concerning the relative lack of character development for the part played by Alain Delon in "L'Eclisse". But this remains a truly...
Published on 21 Feb 2008 by P. B. Koeb

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Passer-By
L'Eclisse concerns a woman, Vittoria, Played by Monica Vitti, drifting through her life and love affairs in a suburban setting. What is principally portrayed is not so much her involement with other people but the debilitating intrusion of the world itself.
We mainly observe Vittoria's rather disengaged existence in two settings: the landscape and the stock...
Published 24 months ago by Peter O'Neill


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5.0 out of 5 stars M.Vitti takes the biscuit, 12 Jun 2012
This review is from: L'Eclisse [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
Once you get over the alienating ennui of the opening ten minutes or so, the slowly developing grip of the film-maker's genius starts to exercise an hypnotic kind of stranglehold. It consists of the camera being in love with the two leads: Delon's sharp features and Vitti's smoky, smudged beauty. The narrative does have humour and lively moments as counterpoint but towards the end the camera comes into its own in one of the most beautiful, bleak endings I have seen, anyway.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my absolute favourites..., 20 July 2011
This review is from: L'Eclisse [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
This film, for me, is the peak of Antonioni's career. After watching this film, everything else seemed over-stuffed and over-wrought. This is not a love story, it's a film that questions the possibility of love existing in a modern world. Only strangers can truly love one another.

Alain Delon is at his most virulant. Monica Vitti is an hypnotising tragedy. And that final sequence...
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent on DVD, 16 July 2011
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This review is from: L'Eclisse [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
As it is unlikely anyone would come across this film by chance, there is no need to describe its artistry.
L'Eclisse is strictly for those who appreciate true art films; as it was made in the era when the the term art film meant something.

The accompanying analysis by an intelligent critic does the film justice, and gives the viewer further food for thought.

Amazon's service, as always was very reliable and the price was indeed an incentive.

Films like this are few and far between.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FAB, 26 April 2013
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This review is from: L'Eclisse [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
BOUGHT THIS AS A GIFT FOR MY HUSBAND WHO REALLY ENJOYED IT. GOOD VALUE FOR THE MONEY. SOMETHING QUITE DIFFERENT!
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Passer-By, 31 Aug 2012
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This review is from: L'Eclisse [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
L'Eclisse concerns a woman, Vittoria, Played by Monica Vitti, drifting through her life and love affairs in a suburban setting. What is principally portrayed is not so much her involement with other people but the debilitating intrusion of the world itself.
We mainly observe Vittoria's rather disengaged existence in two settings: the landscape and the stock exchange where she goes to visit her mother who is so preoccupied with making money that she has little time for her daughter. There is a point in the profiteering melee when an announcement is made of the death of a well known business man and a moment's silence is held. During the interlude, Piero, played by Alain Delon, with whom Vittoria begins a liason, whispers to her how much money is being lost. As soon as the period is over the mayhem of buying and selling erupts again and the tribute is forgotten.
The analogy with the outside environment is a vivid conrast. The invasiveness comes in quietude with the occasional passer-by in the street oblivious to Vittoria and apparently to everthing else. In a memorable scene at the lovers' corner meeting place Vittoria walks away from Piero and then thinks she hears footsteps behind. Believing that he is following she stops and turns around but there is no-one there.
Eventually we have a brief portrait of Vittoria in the street before she moves out of shot leaving only the trees in the background. It is the last time we see her. The camera returns to the meeting place but the lovers do not. Again there are passers-by who, like Vittoria, move out of shot and are gone. Finally, as dusk arrives, only the place is left.
The film belongs to the art cinema of the sixties which was as much considered at the time as anything else. Now special effects and fantasy seem to have won the day. How, then, does L'Eclisse stand up as a work of art?
There is a moment in Piero's flat where Vitti walks past a sculptured head. As she draws level with it she reaches out and pats its neck. It is a conscious gesture that comes accross as an attempt to establish an affinity with the sculpture, maybe even with some national artistic heritage. There is good work in the film particularly in the handling of the stock exchange crowd scenes, in the spirit of place at the close and in many compositions but some of these seem to be there to impress. We may judge that a film is a work of art but we don't need to be dragged by our left ears to making that decision.
I still like the film but rather less than I did and want to. Perhaps all of Antonioni's work belongs to a time of the New Wave, a time that is past.
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L'Eclisse [DVD] [1962]
L'Eclisse [DVD] [1962] by Michelangelo Antonioni (DVD - 2007)
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