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5.0 out of 5 stars old skool jrpg
It is hard to find an old skool turn-based jrpg nowadays.. Well this is one, and I think it is a good one. The voices are kind of annoying, so I turned on the japanese voices which are ridicously funny. But the characters are sympathetic and the story is sound. The game is not too hard but enough of a challenge, and there is a tough secret boss to find. I surely recommend...
Published 20 months ago by Yuri Nuijten

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Better than nothing but not a superior RPG
I'm working my way through all the PS3 RPGs and it's taken me a while to get to this one as it's never really stood out in reviews plus it's also not for sale in a lot of stores but I have finally caught up. Most reviewers are accurate however, because it is not remarkable in any way, however it is a solid game that works and is fairly fun to play.

So, as...
Published on 15 Sept. 2011 by A. Griffiths


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Better than nothing but not a superior RPG, 15 Sept. 2011
By 
A. Griffiths "Adrian" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
I'm working my way through all the PS3 RPGs and it's taken me a while to get to this one as it's never really stood out in reviews plus it's also not for sale in a lot of stores but I have finally caught up. Most reviewers are accurate however, because it is not remarkable in any way, however it is a solid game that works and is fairly fun to play.

So, as befits a Japanese-style RPG this adventure sees you take on the role of a feisty, spiky haired teenager who is going about his business when a terrible and mighty power threatens the world. Unbeknown to you, you have a secret hidden power, which means that you alone are capable of fighting the menace that threatens life as we know it. Together with a rag bag assortment of team mates that include a high born female character with healing powers, a hulk of a brute palace guard with strong physical skills and a perky comedy sidekick who has skill with guns, you make your way through various dungeons and settlements to eventually meet up with and wipe out the terror for good.

I swear in my reviews I could have copied that last paragraph and pasted it every time I review one of these games...it's unbelievable that RPGs are STILL slavishly following this formula after so many years. But there you go. Nuff said.

So, onto battles. Turn based, random encounters. Nothing new there. But there are some clever touches. First of all, battles take place on a grid, and part of your turn involves moving to a square on the grid before attacking. The reason for this is that each character has attack moves that hit a selected range, sometimes this is a strict line in front of them, sometimes a fan out or a single square directly in front of them. So you can see that the "move" step gives depth to the fighting because you need to make sure each character moves to a square where an enemy is with their range to hit...hopefully more than one at a time. After moving you choose your attack move, then repeat for all characters, and then once they are all set, the attacks all play out, and the enemy takes their turn.

The reason I liked this is because of the additional strategy. Because, all of the following can happen and affect the flow of battle:
1. The enemy also has set attack ranges so you should also take care not to bunch up so all your team are in range of too many attacks.
2. Characters and enemies have elemental classes that do double or half damage for opposing or same element attacks.
3. Putting character behind other characters gives the ones at the back "cover" and reduced damage from some attacks
4. Some enemies also do this, often a weak boss is behind a clump of big fat tank supporting enemies that cover him.
5. Sometimes you get combos if several characters target the same enemy, the attacks stack together ( a combo meter has to fill for this)
6. Enemies can also get combos on you - this can be devastating
7. Characters have a "limit-break" attack called an EX move that can only be used sparingly - save this for bosses. EX moves are also elemental.

So as you can see the battles can be fun. What lets them down is minor, but the camera view for battles is dreadful, it has about 4 fixed view points, none of which let you see every part of the battle grid clearly - and you need this to plan your positioning. Which is the shame as normal gameplay has a very good player-controlled camera view. But apart from that I enjoyed all the fights. You get better experience for better fights (for example, winning with "overkill" moves rather than just scraping a victory by attrition earns you more points) so it pays to fight smart.

But now I'm afraid I have to list a few things that don't score so well with this game. The environments and scenery are not that good. Some places like the towns have quite poor textures on the buildings and are low on detail. All the NPCs are built using the same basic models (about 6 of them) just with different clothes. The external scenery is also quite drab - trees have few branches and sometimes just sprout from the ground like posts with no effort made to create realistic roots or foundations (the area outside the Earth Temple was particularly bad). Sense of height and distance is good, you can be quite high up (in London city for example) and enjoy some nice views, but on the whole the environments are not that impressive. Watch out for the stage set in Kyoto where there is an appallingly bad attempt at showing reflections in water which really should have been fixed before release. The other niggle is that nearly all the cut scenes are done via static portraits of the characters with recorded speech and subtitles. So an anguished confession or heated argument will sound great on the soundtrack (the voice recordings are quite good), but might be played out over a 2D image of the character set in position with a hand over their face.

My other drawback is the golem collection aspect of the game: as you progress you can find and create "golems" which can be used in your team. There are supposedly up to 140 different golems that can be found created or won in the game. It's very reminiscent of the Shin Megami Tensei series of game, in that you find creatures and use them in your battle team, and the further into the game you go, the better the golems. Each golem has a unique design, character and skills. This sounds like fun, but my issue is this: once you have met the four main human characters in the game, you have no more rom in your battle team for any golems. The four human characters have very flexible skills and abilities - the golems do not. They never learn new skills., but the human characters keep evolving. So as soon as I had my main four, I hardly ever used golems in battle again, and I even stopped synthesising the ones that I had found as they all just got stuck in my inventory and did nothing.

Apart from those niggles, I did enjoy the game. It's relatively easy if you level up properly although there are some tricky bosses . There are optional bosses and an optional dungeon, a casino/battle arena where you can play for fun, and some ultimate weapons and skills to earn. All standard fare for an RPG and all fairly satisfactory.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Promising, but ultimately flawed, 7 Aug. 2012
= Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
I really did have high hopes for this game when I read the premise. Here is a turn based RPG that combines strategic battling and an involved story with the collecting and raising of Lucifer's Call / Pokemon. Unfortunately, while there is a lot here, the game ultimately doesn't deliver on the promise it contains.

The basic story sees you in control of the protagonist Atsuma, who is a student of enchanting golems at Yokohama University along with his friends. As with standard J-RPG fare, he has issues with his memory and a clouded past along with mysterious powers that manifest in his right arm (no sniggering from the peanut gallery please.) While skipping class to attend a festival, all the golems in town go on a rampage and through a series of increasing acts of stupidity, Atsuma succeeds in using his strange powers to free an entombed Devil Golem from an ancient war from beneath the University, thus starting his quest to save the world from ancient technology and magic gone bad.

I say increasing acts of stupidity because the story, or rather the characters, are the first area in which this game lets itself down. I don't know what it is about Japanese RPGs where the writers always seem to assume that you would dearly love to be in control of a lazy, annoying, food scarfing, responsibility shirking dropout boy with the mental acuity of a lobotomised Doberman. The character you control in this game is more irritating than Vaan and Tidus put together and clearly doesn't have two brain cells to rub together. Your first introduction to him is through his snores on a black screen as he sleeps in a lecture and things go downhill from there. The following is pretty much actual dialogue from the game.

(While at the end of a path standing in front of a ladder,)
Dropout Boy: Huh, is this a dead end?
Companion: No, you see that there? That's a ladder, and if you press X in front of it, you can climb up.
Dropout Boy: Cool

(While standing in front of steps down into some water.)
Companion: Look, we can get down into the water there.
Dropout Boy: But we can't walk under water, we'll drown.
Companion: No you won't. If you press X while standing in front of it, you can swim.
Dropout Boy: Cool.

Yes, it is that bad, and is about the level of any tuition offered to him throughout the game. Strangely enough, the complexities of the battle system aren't explained in anything like this amount of detail. The other characters are all just as mediocre, either being obvious stereotypes or trying hard to be someone else. Atsuma's two closest friends fill the roles of "emotionless genius" and "screamingly outrageous transexual" and don't immediately draw you in as rounded characters. The martial artist you later meet fails at mixing the grace of Tifa with the fiesty Chie (Persona 4) and just ends up being bratty and bitchy, while the stoic swordsman tries to be all that Auron is, and fails miserably in every department. Finally it's almost painful watching the young golem hunter trying to act like Yuffie.

The combat is the meat of the game, however, and it is a system with much going for it. You and your opponents are lined up on a grid, and take turns to move within that grid and attack your enemies. You can't move into your opponent's half of the grid, but your skills and attacks can affect different ranges of squares in his half like a game of battleships. A machine gun burst might affect a whole column, for example, while raising a column of fire roasts an X of squares. Positioning yourself behind an ally might cover you from the machine gun, but not the fire column. It's a simple system to learn, but is flawed in a few ways.

Firstly, your HP and MP are restored after every battle, so for the most part each battle consists of you using your most devastating skills to wipe the enemy out before they can reply. This is especially the case as, the longer the battle goes on and the more you are hit, the more your vitality gauge drops after the battle. When this is zero, your character's HP and MP are set to 1 until you rest at a recharge station in town. Hence, you want to finish each battle as soon as possible, preferably in the first turn so you don't lose any vitality. There are about 140 different golems that you can acquire the cores for and then build using materials bought or won, that you can use to bulk out your group and replace tired characters, but unlike with Lucifer's Call, you never actually feel like using any of them as you'll always want to get your human characters into battle to win skill points to build them up. Vitality, therefore, and winning battles quickly, becomes too much of a focus.

Graphically, the game has issues also. While some of the textures are well done (the ocean around Yokohama is particularly stunning when seen for the first time,) others are bland and need work. Character models also fall well into the uncanny valley of plastic faces and wooden expressions.

The scenery is okay, but there's just so little of it. In every area, you're limited to tiny corridors that take you to your next destination, and these corridors are very short. To travel the many miles between two cities of opposing nations, it's meant to be a long and hard journey, but honestly to run it without any encounters would probably take you less than two minutes in the game. With the high encounter rate and length of the battles though, that journey becomes about half an hour. Therein lies one of the flaws of this battle system as well - while it's fun the first time, and even the tenth time, by the hundredth time of fighting the same bland enemies it just gets a little tiring and becomes a chore instead of fun. There is an auto-battle, but even that takes time, and the AI for it is appalling.

To finish, this game has a lot of good ideas, and I wanted to see them work. However, it fails to bring all of the different strands together, and in the end is just not fun.
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5.0 out of 5 stars old skool jrpg, 2 July 2013
By 
Yuri Nuijten (netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
It is hard to find an old skool turn-based jrpg nowadays.. Well this is one, and I think it is a good one. The voices are kind of annoying, so I turned on the japanese voices which are ridicously funny. But the characters are sympathetic and the story is sound. The game is not too hard but enough of a challenge, and there is a tough secret boss to find. I surely recommend this game.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars waste of time and money, 23 Feb. 2008
= Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
where to start on the bad points of this game?
1) the voice acting is jarring, it ruins the whole feel and atmosphere of the game.
2) the battles pop up every 2 steps you make, with the same enemies you just killed 2 seconds ago.
3) the story line is horrific it makes you wonder why all the characters are so retarded as to keep walking in to obviously strange and dangerous places.
4) every time they try and talk to you they make it as long and dragged out as possible.
5) the six axis mini games you have are fun at first but get tedious when your doing them for the 6th millionth time.
6) the golums you make arnt even useful in the slightest the only reason you use them is because if you didnt you would have wasted materials synthing them.

im currently 70% completed this game and to be truthful if gives long drawn out tutorials into the most useless things like climbing a ladder and even moving but fails to deliver useful information like how to change the perametres of your characters.

i bought my copy 2nd hand and it was in mint condition, i can understand why, the pervious owner must have sold it back to the shop within 2 hours of playing the damn thing.

DONT BUY waste of money and please believe me when i say you will have more fun playing FF7 or even harvest moon, both ps1 games that now sell for about 20p
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4.0 out of 5 stars Enchanted Arms, 16 Sept. 2011
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
Been looking for this game for a long time now and I'm seriously loving it! Not a game for every kind of people so buy this only if your into RPG's.
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18 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enchanted Arms... Not so enchanting in places..., 11 April 2007
By 
a1b3ri0 (Leeds, Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
Ok, so in theory this game is the first Japanese style role-playing game (RPG) to grace the newly acclaimed Playstation 3 (PS3). It sets out to be a combination of what some gamers may have experienced before in games such as the Final Fantasy series, and something similar to Yu-Gi-Oh / Pokemon. The result is a game very similar to Lucifer Calls for the Playstation 2 (PS2).

The story of the game is that you are a student at an academy for those being schooled in how to fight alongside "golems". Golems are collectable creatures which you end up battling alongside against other golems and characters. Unfortunately this game takes a ling time to begin, it took me close to an hour to get into the game, this first hour being incredably slow, to the extent of being painful and me regretting purchasing the game in the first place. Patience, i hasten to add, revealed something much different.

As the game develops it flows more freely. Away from the stunted battling and epic dialogues the game actually plays well in the field. Most battles are random encounters and thus far (i am still only 10% into the game) there is quite a variety of enemy to fight against. There are many comparisons that can be drawn with Final Fantasy, not least the field itself, resembling many of the places visited in Final Fantasy 10 (the first city you see resembles Luca superbly!). The switches, moving platforms and event the healing points also have strong Final Fantasy connatations. The one thing that does stand out though is the ability to save the game anywhere, at any point and any time - that i cannot argue with.

The music is extremely annoying and repetative. If you expect some grand score like in many other RPG's, you will be massively dissappointed. may i recommend that you mute the sound and listen to some rock music instead - much more enjoyable.

Graphically, this game does not cut it. The in-game graphics are very PS2 rather than PS3, being blocky and angular where with next generation consoles we should be looking at much smoother viewing and some sense of environment (there is not even a hint of a breeze - i.e. flowers stay stationary, as does charcters hair), as this is something that has been developed on PC a long time ago (see Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion for a supreme example of this). When a character runs around the background jerks and stutters, and the run itself is more of a wooden gait. As for the video sequences, they are impressive compared to say a cartoon, but after the release of Final Fantasy Advent Children last year we should expect to see that standard of video in our games now.

At this point i have to apologise for comparing so much to Final Fantasy. The reason for this is two-fold. I am a big fan of the Final Fantasy series, however i am severely dissappointed with its most recent offereing of Final Fantasy 12, and secondly, most reviewers will use Final Fantasy as a point of comparrison as it is possibly the most established RPG to date, as well as being the most successful (although at times far from perfect!).

Gameplay, as i have mentioned seems fluid, though as with the introduction, i expect much more epic dialogue and not so imaginative quests to come. The battle system itself is something quite different. Based on games like Disgaea, the battle system comprises a grid in which you can move, and from where you select your characters actions. There are two halves to the grid, your own side and an enemy side. Different attacks, support actions (such as heal, extra defence, etc.) and special attacks cover different grid squares, and different combinations of grid squares. The most flexible part of battling is the combination of golems you can equip and have fight alongisde you. Each golem collected has different attacks or support actions and an element. The are 6 elements in terms of battling, fire and water, light and dark, and earth and wind. Each element is weak to its opposite, so fire is weak to water, and water is weak to fire. And thus, this is the basics of battle.

Overall the game seems sound, but although it is 50+hours long, i'm not sure it will hold my attention for that long. Definately worth a look for experienced and novice RPG fans alike, however, the more experienced of you will be dissappointed whilst finding some mild amusement in the game. I would recommend this game to novices though, as it is acessable, easy to follow and yes, fun too. I would advise that you quickly upgrade to the likes of the Final Fantasy series or Oblivion as soon as you feel comfortable with the basic RPG idea for a better game though.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just a quick note of caution..., 29 Aug. 2007
By 
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
Be aware. There is a bug in the UK release of this game due to a faulty batch that causes the game to crash, sometimes frequently. Judging by the number of occurences and complaints in online forums I would estimate that you have a 1 in 3 chance of experiencing this problem. You may be lucky and be able to finish the game without any problems.

If you are interested in this game and don't mind waiting a little longer, I would recommend importing an American version for the same price which will work perfectly on your UK PS3 as each disc is not region coded (try Amazon.com or GameXchange).
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars nearly but not quite..., 29 Oct. 2007
By 
Mr. A. A. Jones "choppers" (lil' ol' ledbury) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
In all fairness i bought this as a stop gap waiting for FF and have been reasonably impressed although as stated in other reviews sound (awful)
and graphics (average) aren't the best but gameplay itself is slick and the ability to have over 100 golems at your disposal is a cool touch although after 80% of the game completed i'm struggling to keep them all in use.
The major sticking point for me on this game is that after 60 + hours of
gameplay I haven't had a challenge yet this game is a bit easy for the
hardened role player but for the novice and beginners out there this game is ideal, fun to play with some nice visuals on the later battle scenes
it's not great, nearly but not quite.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 27 July 2014
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
a derpy minion master game in a way but fun most of the time;D
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Real RPG, 28 Feb. 2008
By 
I. D. Clarke "MouseyC" (Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Enchanted Arms (PS3) (Video Game)
This is the first Real RPG i've picked up for my PS3, PC or anything else since Wild Arms 3 seeing as the world seems to be obsessed with Western Style RPG's at the moment. By Real i mean, it's not a sandbox free roaming thing with 40 Million hours of gameplay and sidequests. The likes of Oblivion and Western RPG's in general that seem to think a good RPG means "Do what ever you want, even if you don't want to do the story". Call me old fashioned but i like doing the story bit and i dont want to have to go and find it, when a game does this i often just stumble around the world never getting anything done.

Right, rant over. About Enchanted Arms.

Yes, Real RPG with random battles to boot. The battle system is this grid based thingy where you place your characters like a chess board for lack of a better term, if you're used to J-RPG's you'll pick this up no problem but equally the learning curve is easy. One of those easy to play difficult to master things. However it can make some of the easier battles a little longer and annoying if you're just grinding away to level up. Aswell as battling with your characters there are Golems to help you out, they come in various different shapes and sizes and collect them a bit like pokemon. You beat a Golem and then get a sort of schematic telling you what items you need build it.

The leveling up is a little like Final Fantasy 10, you level up and also get points to spent on two things. A new skill (which you have to buy before you can learn) or increasing your attributes HP, EP (magic) etc...

One thing i'm not a fan of in this game is the dialogue, there's nothing wrong with the conversations it's how it's delivered. When ever you talk to any character, you see them both in the foreground of the screen like the 'Tales Of...' series and they animate just enough to get their point accross and as only two can be on the screen at the same time they pop in and out randomly. Unlike other RPG's where they stand about, walk around and interact with each other properly. It sometimes removes you from the emotions of the characters. It does however have properly acted sequences to go with these that you get every once in a while.

Graphics last, as they never make a good game and certainly don't make good RPG. They're nothing special. At a stretch some of it could have just been done on a PS2. Saying that, its a pretty polished game overall.

I wont mention any story for fear of spoilers, but it's solid enough.

I'm not going as far as to say this is a must for your PS3 collection, but if you're tired of replaying RPG's on your PS2 there's not really a lot else out there and there are far worse games you could spend your time and money. It's one of those - If you're an RPG fan you'll love it. If not well, you might not love it - thing.
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Enchanted Arms (PS3)
Enchanted Arms (PS3) by Ubisoft (PlayStation 3)
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