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132 of 134 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dimensions?
Celestron Astromaster 130EQ

Very surprised at the quality for the money. If you're into astronomy in a big way but can't afford an all-singing-all-dancing digital telescope, then this might appeal to you.
The eyepieces are of excellent quality and that really counts when viewing.
Let me break it down a bit.

Pluses:
* Terrific build...
Published on 30 Jan. 2011 by Rick Blade

versus
166 of 176 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New to Astronomy
Celestron Astromaster 130EQ

I purchased the Celestron Astromaster 130EQ as a starter telescope aimed at 'newbie' astronomers. For the price it is an impressive piece of kit. It comes well packaged and is easy to assemble using the picture guide that comes with it. If you get stuck there is a YouTube video to help you.

Of course you get what you pay...
Published on 3 Mar. 2011 by Thinpig


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132 of 134 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dimensions?, 30 Jan. 2011
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
Celestron Astromaster 130EQ

Very surprised at the quality for the money. If you're into astronomy in a big way but can't afford an all-singing-all-dancing digital telescope, then this might appeal to you.
The eyepieces are of excellent quality and that really counts when viewing.
Let me break it down a bit.

Pluses:
* Terrific build quality
* Very precise control
* Solid tripod
* Quality eyepieces

Minuses:
* A bit weighty if you're lugging very far

Recommended attachments: (available at Amazon.)
* Moon filter (Celestron)
* Revelation Astro 5X Barlow lens OR Celestron `Omni' Series 2X Barlow
* Phillip's Planisphere
* Celestron Flash Light, Red Astro Lite
* Celestron Omni 4mm eyepiece OR SEITZ High Power 4mm Glass eyepiece

For astrophotography:
* Camera adapter 93626 (Celestron or Bar and Stroud)

Dimensions: (approx.)
* Main scope length = 24 inches
* Scope diameter = 6 inches
* Minimum floor-to-eyepiece = 42 inches (depending on scope pitch)
* Tripod spread = 42 inches
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A superb starter telescope; my mind has been expanded by this little beauty., 2 Dec. 2014
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
I was brought this telescope for a graduation present and boy am I happy with it. Here is my opinion:
It will take you a while to get used to it (and you will need to put effort in to understand how to use it properly, but once you do, it's a dream (for a first scope). You should check out my blog www(dot)Jackedwardlee(dot)com . Here, I keep an astronomy log book of everything I have seen. If you have any specific questions, ask away.

Advice and tips:

• Don't extent the tripod legs out all the way; the shorter they are, the more stable the telescope will be.
• The EQ mount is ace, once you get the hang of it (again, it takes time and effort to work it out).
• You need to put some effort into learning the night sky. I recommend stellarium or 'turn left at Orion'
• Manage your expectations! Stars pretty much always look like points of light, even through Hubble. Astronomy is not so much about what the eyes see, but what the mind comprehends. Most deep sky object look like ‘faint fuzzies’, even through large telescope.
• Invest in the “Celestron accessory kit (6 mm, 15mm EP, 2x Barlow)”. This add-on will massively improve the functionality of the telescope.
• Forget about the red dot finder. Just use that to get within the vicinity of your target. Invest in a cheap 30 mm eyepiece and use the large field of view to find targets. Again, finding things in the night sky is a skill that requires practice. When I first used this scope, it took me ages (and I mean ages) to even find Jupiter (one of the brightest objects in the night sky). However, now I can point at objects in less than a minute, without even using the red-dot finder.
• You always need to make sure the telescope/tube is balanced. Google a video by 'eyes on the sky' on aligning equatorial mount.
• Keep with it, it really is a new skill to learn and master, but now I'm so glad I kept at it; it's worth it. Invest time into reading about how telescopes work and the night sky.
• I have also brought a solar filter for this scope; looking at the sun is awesome (but NEVER look at the sun without a proper filter; you will get blinded!)
• For the price, and the enjoyment this has brought me, I would definitely give this scope 5/5!
• Here is a list of everything I have observed with this telescope:
Moon
Jupiter and its moons
Saturn
Mars
M13: Globular Cluster
M81: Galaxy
M82: Galaxy
Epsilon Lyrae: Double-Double
M57: Planetary Nebula
M64: Galaxy
M31: Galaxy
Albireo: Double Star
Mizar + Alcor: Double Star
M3: Globular Cluster
M51: Galaxy
M56: Globular Cluster
M27: Planetary Nebula
M92: Globular Cluster
M11: Open Cluster
M71: Globular Cluster
M10: Globular Cluster
M12: Globular Cluster
M52: Open Cluster
The Double Cluster
NGC 7789: Open Cluster
Cassiopeia: Open Clusters
M81: Galaxy
M82: Galaxy
Cor Caroli
M94: Galaxy
M21: Open Cluster
M20: Planetary nebula
M5 Globular Cluster
M101: Galaxy
M29: Open Cluster
M110: Galaxy
Gamma Delphini: Double Star
M15: Globular Cluster
M16: Eagle nebula
M17: Swan nebula
M22: Globular cluster
M45: Open cluster
M110: Galaxy/a>
M32: Galaxy/a>
M2: Globular cluster
Almaak: Double Star
Neptune: Planet
IC 4665: Open Cluster
Epsilon Lyrae: Double-Double
M103: Open Cluster
NGC 457: Open Cluster
NGC 464: Open Cluster
NGC 459: Open Cluster
Eta Cassiopeiae: Double Star
M39: Open Cluster
M34: Open Cluster
M33: Galaxy
M42: Nebula
M43: Nebula
M37: Open Cluster
M36: Open Cluster
M38: Open Cluster
M1: Crab Nebula
M35 & NGC 2158
Uranus: Planet
Total Messier Objects 42/110
Total Planets Observed 5/7

• Below are some of the images I have been able to capture using the ‘Celetron Astromaster 130 EQ MD. These were all taken just using my smartphone (by holding it up to the lens)!

Cheers and clear skies!
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401 of 419 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best christmas gifts that i have bought, 25 Nov. 2008
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
Since the main factor in telescope size is diameter of the mirror or lens, a larger scope is a better choice if you want a scope that has potential to maintain an interest in astronomy. A small telescope can see exactly the same TYPES of objects as a large telescope, it just cant-see as many of them or as much detail in them. If you are concerned with performance, buy the largest telscope you can afford that has all the features that you want. go with the 130EQ if you can afford it.I found it to be the best value telescope on the market and i did alot of research.
Good luck
jack (Bath)
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163 of 172 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent choice for those who want it all- easy to use AND great quality viewing!, 26 Nov. 2008
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
I wanted a decent telescope that I was going to be able to see lots with BUT without the complex set up and complicated controls (am slightly technically challenged with this sort of thing!). After doing lots of research I chose this one and have to say I'm really pleased. It was easy to set up and use (my stepkids enjoy it too) but we can see a great deal, very clearly. Excellent!!
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166 of 176 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New to Astronomy, 3 Mar. 2011
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
Celestron Astromaster 130EQ

I purchased the Celestron Astromaster 130EQ as a starter telescope aimed at 'newbie' astronomers. For the price it is an impressive piece of kit. It comes well packaged and is easy to assemble using the picture guide that comes with it. If you get stuck there is a YouTube video to help you.

Of course you get what you pay for and the 130EQ has limitations. It is best suited to observing the Moon and planets. Don't expect closeups of deep space objects. Using the telescope takes practise, but on the first evening out we got some great views of the moon.

Included in the package is TheSkyX - First Light Edition software. This is a great tool. Input your latitude and longtitude (available from Google World) and TheSkyX will deliver a view of the night sky at any time you choose. It recommends some targets complete with RA and DEC. Great for planning your observing sessions.

The two lenses supplied with the 130EQ are just adequate to get you started, but you will soon want to add to them, for example you should purchase a 2x Barlow lens.

On the downside there is a major problem with the 130EQ associated with aligning the telescope and finding objects. The problem is the starfinder that comes fitted to the telescope. It contains two concentric rings and a central dot. The dot is illuminated red for use at night. The concentric rings worked well in daylight, but at night they are impossible to see and aligning the red dot with a star is near impossible. For novice users this finder is a source of frustration and would put off all but the most dogged new astronomer. I wonder how many people have given up on the hobby because of this cheap piece of optical engineering. Celestron should ditch it and do better. However, there is a simple and cheap solution - the Telrad Refex Finder. An oversized, odd looking device (costing around £35) that works superbly well. It has three illuminated target rings. Point the Telrad at a star and bingo it appears in the center of your eyepiece. I love the Telrad. It makes the 130EQ usable.

In summary the 130EQ is a mixed bag. I would recommend this telescope to those people with a budding interest in astronomy or those with a casual interest in the near objects of the solar system. If the interest survives a year or so of using the 130EQ there are plenty of motorised and computerised Goto telescopes (costing many times more than the 130EQ) to take you forward. The Celestron Astromaster 130EQ does little to solve the two biggest challenges for inexperienced astronomers - aligning the telescope and finding objects. The poor finder means that I can only give it 3 Stars. Fit a Telrad and get some better quality eyepieces and it becomes a 4 Star telescope.
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202 of 215 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good all-round telescope, 3 Feb. 2009
By 
M. Babb - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
This is a lovely telescope that should give you many years of fun.

It's quite impressive when put together (which is a breeze) although the counterweight is quite heavy, and the actual telescope quite large, so it's not that portable, without taking it off the tripod.

Once set up, following the simple instructions, you're ready to go, as long as you can get a clear night.

One thing to remember with this, or any optical telescope, is that the stars will always remain the same size, regardless of magnification. What you WILL see, however, is stars that were too faint to see with the naked eye.

Take Plaedes (The "Seven Sisters") for example. Just a faint collection of 7 stars. The finder scope will bring all 7 into view, but will show about 20 more that you didn't know were there. Even the lowest (20mm) magnification eyepiece will limit your field of view to one of the sisters (plus others in the background).

You may find you'll need a greater collection of eyepieces than the 2 supplied, or even a 2x or 3x Barlow lens (used in conjunction with the eye pieces) if you want to see Venus in any appreciable size.

The only problem (as with many scopes) is judder. It will take a few seconds to settle down once you've focussed.
If you're going to use it for astro photography, you'll need a t-mount which screws onto the scope (although my Nikon D70 won't focus properly unless I'm using a 2x Barlow magnifier with it). You'll also need a single axis motor drive, as the stars and moon will move surprisingly quick in your field of view.

In all, it's a lovely telescope. Fairly sturdy, very bright optics and easy to use. The supplied software is also pretty good.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great starter scope, 5 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
I've only been able to use the Astromaster three or four times so far, but it's far superior to my other (cheap) telescope. The tripod is reasonably stable, the mount works well and the tube appears bulletproof. My only gripe is the Starpointer sight: it's completely useless. I replaced mine with a Telrad, which is probably overkill on a scope like this, but it makes the Astromaster much easier to use.
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107 of 114 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good first telescope, 20 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
This telescope is good value for money, I've had one for a year and enjoy it, but you will need to understand what you're buying. Downsides first.

- There is no motorised drive on this telescope, so you will need to manually adjust it yourself. This isn't a big deal when you are looking for obvious objects in the sky such as the Moon, Jupiter, Mars and so on, but it will take a bit of practise to get what you want in the viewfinder. It's an obvious point, but the things are you looking at will move across the sky, so if you plan to observe it at a high magnification for a few minutes you'll need to keep adjusting the scope to keep it in view.

- The telescope will wobble a bit when you're adjusting the position or focus of the scope. This means you adjust the position, then wait for a few seconds while it settles, before the image is clear. This is slightly annoying when you're using a high magnification as the wobble is more pronounced.

- If you're looking for a deep space object like the andromeda galaxy or the great nebula in orion, expect to see some grey cloudly blobs. You won't be able to use magnification on those to see them better with this scope due to the way your eyes work, and the width of the telescope to collect that very dim light. Again due to how your eyes work, if you look indirectly at these objects they will appear brighter, which can be a bit odd to try and deal with.

The positive points:

- If you want to see the moon in more detail, this scope can do the job. You will be able to see Jupiter and it's moons with the supplied eyepieces as long as you're not in a heavily light polluted area (look up in the night sky when it's cloudy, if you see orange clouds due to the reflection of the streetlights on them, that's your first clue). Jupiter will look like a white blob, but with the 10x eyepiece you may be able to see some of the darker cloud bands on the planet. You can see Saturn and its rings, although this will not appear larger than a pea with a single ring viewable around it with the supplied eyepieces.

- It's portable enough to collapse the tripod and the telescope into the back of the car and drive somewhere that's less light polluted. You can also move it around from the shed/garage to the garden without too much trouble.

- You can also grab apps for your smartphone (both the android and the iphone have them) that will allow you to point your phone at the sky and it'll tell you what you're pointing at. Then you can follow through with adjusting the scope to point at the object you've identified with the phone.

- The tripod legs are of adjustable height. This is of particular value if you have children who want a look in the eyepiece to check out that shiny star or just look at a planet.

- There are a few small things you can obtain to "upgrade" this scope and these are also purchasable from Amazon. Things that I've bought over time are

(a) Celestron 2x Barlow lens for additional magnification when looking at planets. This gives you four magnification combinations as you basically attach your eyepiece to this and it doubles the magnification. For example with this and looking at Jupiter, you can definitely see the cloud bands although these will appear in black and white to your eyes.

(b) A Moon filter. This screws on the bottom of your supplied eyepieces and gives a green tint over everything. This is useful when you want to stare at the moon for a few minutes because your eyes will start to hurt a bit from the glare of the reflected sunlight.

(c) If you want to do a bit of cheap astrophotography, you can use this scope as a starting point to get a feel for it. Since digitcal cameras work differently to your eyeballs, you'll be able to get colour on the planets that before just looked white to your eyes. My philips SPC880 webcam (flashed to a 900) with a 1.25" webcam adaptor and some free software like Registax was around 40 quid, and provides pretty reasonable photos of the larger/closer planets.

Since England isn't the most naturally cloud-free country, although I've had this scope for nearly a year I only end up using it a few times a month when the skies are clear in the night. This in itself means that it's something to look forward to, stargazing doesn't really get "old" and with the odd upgrade the scope has quite a long lifetime. For the discounted price, if you're looking to get a foothold in some stargazing, it's worth a punt and there's a few relatively inexpensive addons you can get along the way to help.

If you want super clear colour images of planets and very clear deep space object pictures, you will have to shell out a lot more cash :)
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very good telescope!!!, 6 Sept. 2010
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
I have had this telescope for about a month now and I would most definately recomend it to anyone who was interested in astronomy. This telescope is very good quility for the price and I do not think that you could get a better one for the price. I have not yet had the oppertunity to buy any other lenses, but the ones that come with it are very good and are okay to use until you have the oppertunity to get some more. I would recomend that you buy a barlow lens if you are getting this telescope as when looking at some planets, such as Jupiter, they appear very small so you can not see them in much detail.

Overall this is a very good telescope with a good mount and sterdy tripod, the only let down with this telescope though is the star finder as it is very hard to use it in the dark because you have to line up two small dots and you can not see one of them when it is dark. This is my first telescope and when I was buying it I did not know if I would be able to use it, but after only a month I have seen Juipter with it's four largest moons. This telescope is well made, easy to set up and use and has a sterdy mount. Very good for the price.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant telescope for the money, 28 Sept. 2009
By 
mhig "mary" (Wales United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope (Electronics)
Fantastic telescope, I bought it for my husband but I love it too! It takes a bit to get your head around, i.e just getting used to it and knowing the controls but it's a lovely scope with very clear images. Saw the moon in great detail, lovely. If a bit mindboggled when putting it together? Check youtube, write in celestron astromaster 130eq and theres a video on the first page it shows you how to put it together. Really helpful!
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Celestron 130EQ Astromaster Reflector Telescope
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