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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The album I hoped Slade would record, 23 Feb 2007
This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
The hot summer of 76 ! bak 'ome from the pub, headphones on.[can't wake the folks !]always side 2 before side 1.Having grown with Slade,the progression of Nod and Jims writing was always there on b sides and album tracks.Flame was a great example,if you want to hear the more melodic and unusual Slade sound then buy both ! Fools just blew me away,so many different styles,I'm a Talker , LA Jinx , All the World is a Stage,Get on Up , Scratch my Back [ Bad Company or what ?] The singles In for A Penny and Lets call it quits were possibly 2 of the lesser tracks. Great value with the extra tracks and booklet.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Certainly Nobody's Fools, 6 Feb 2007
By 
Geoffrey Lake "banginman" (Shropshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
Review taken from promo copy kindly supplied by Union Square Music.

My earliest memory of this album was sitting clutching said latest vinyl offering, impatiently waiting for the Ferry Cross The Mersey to take me from Liverpool, back home to Birkenhead to listen to it. The year was 1976.

The album was recorded during an 18-month sojourn to try and crack the USA and had obviously influenced the band. This album was yet another twist and risky adventure into new territories. This American influence saw the band trying new styles and ideas once more.

We start with Nobody's Fool, a piano led track that was also a single that never saw the light of day. The track is a great opener but at the time, was very different approach. The added inclusion of girl-backing vocals was very much a surprise. The first thing I noticed with this release was a very clean sound. Remastered by Tim Turan and yes, it shows.

The next track `Do The Dirty' has Nod doing his more familiar vocals but the track still did not (at the time) sound like a Slade track. Jim Lea's backing vocal seems clearer on this version. Did it really sound this good on the Polydor release, no it did not. The guitar break sounds much more sharper to me too.

Let's Call It Quits was one of Slade's minor hit singles at the time. A real raunchy track that sounds fresh as ever here. Very naughty lyrics and how it never got banned from airplay at the time always amazed me.

Slade go country with Pack Up Your Troubles. Dobro guitar (from Paul Prestotino) really adds to it. A real nice track to follow the noisy and rocky `Quits'. The band, showing us, just how versatile they were.

In For A Penny was another single release and again a minor hit. Dave Hill's guitar is a real peach on this. Sounding better than ever on this remastered release. Nod is in fine vocal performance mode here. An unusual choice for a single but sits nicely on here.

The very naughty Get On Up was song about...well work it out! This track was a live opener for a few years. Nice guitar work from Dave Hill and Jim Lea's bass sounds bigger than ever. Backing vocals from Tasha Thomas really brings this alive.

L.A. Jinx was the story of Slade's bad luck every time they played live there. A clever lyric makes for a nice little ditty.

'Did Ya Mama Ever tell Ya?' and Nod decides to inform us all of the real meanings of those nursery rhymes. Slade do reggae? It sort of works but only just. It has less long lasting appeal and Slade does Judge Dredd does not really do it for me. However, it does sound much clearer than before.

Scratch My Back a real rocker that lights up after the previous track. Nod must have had sex on his mind a lot those days. Holder is bragging at one point that he is the best!!!! A stand out moment track for me.

`I'm A Talker' takes us by surprise with a very untypical Slade track. Only Nod's vocal gives it away. Different but nice too.

`All The World Is A Stage'. Nod wants to thanks the fans for listening and buying those tickets. He wants you to know that we support each other. A little bit over the top but the clever working of Shakespeare's words sort of works. The ending, at the time, took us all by surprise too.

As with most of these Union Square Music releases, the CD contains some bonus tracks. This time the added bonus includes the hit single Thanks For The Memory (the remastering has brought out more for this great single), 'Raining in my Champagne' the B-Side of `Memory' A comparison to The Beatles `Twist And Shout' was raised in a music magazine at the time. It is similar but you judge. I personally love it. Two more B-Sides are `Can You Just Imagine' and `When The Chips Are Down' follows and it is nice to hear these tracks in pristine condition.

This remastered version of Nobody's Fools has never sounded better. These very reasonable priced remastered CD's complete with bonus tracks, slip case, and booklet containing some great pictures are a real treat. Thanks you Union Square Music, Thanks you Tim Turan. I look forward to future releases. Keep On Rockin'.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Slade at their best, 13 Feb 2007
By 
This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
This album was originally released in 1976 around the time that Slade were spending a lot of time in the States. It was around this time that they discovered bands like ZZ Top and it definitely altered their sound. I can remember loving this album at the time and 30 years later has done nothing to change my views. Now with bonus tracks including their fabulous Thanks For The Memory single this one is most definitely recommended.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nobody's fools indeed, 15 Feb 2007
By 
12stringbassist "....." (NorthWest, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
Nobody's Fools is mainly known as Slade's "American album". It was recorded during Slade's self-imposed exile from the UK during 1975 and 1976.

To say that the album is an attempt to create a sound that US radio programmers would warm to is an understatement. It is difficult to review the album separately from a basic narrative of where they were at in their career at the time.

Previously, Slade had had limited success in the USA and their small following was gained via word of mouth following live shows (often supporting clearly inferior acts that they wouldn't have dreamed of having on three acts below them on a bill in the UK).

Being hailed previously as 'The New British Beatles' has served to get their prospective audiences backs up and, to be honest, did them very few favours at all with radio and concert promoters.

The band had decided, along with Chas Chandler, that an all-out assault on the only market that they hadn't conquered so far was the only way forward. They had done a series of short US tours previously, but going home to tour at the point where their US presence was beginning to make a difference didn't make sense to them. They felt the UK was safe territory and that they could afford a 'year out'. . Whether or not that was correct is debatable.

The group have spoken many times since of the fact that they were 'going stale'. Whatever the actual truth of the matter, the whole 'Nobody's fools' album displays a huge desire to radically change the band and it's sound. The band certainly achieved that objective and the results covered a wide spectrum of styles and gave Slade a new lease of life, if not the chart placings that the album deserved.

The title track, 'Nobody's fool' features a strident piano intro from Jim Lea (edited on the 45 release) and double tracked guitars from Dave throughout. The beat is a little more disco-fied than usual for Slade and the presence of girl backing singers let you know this is a quite different Slade to that we previously knew and loved. The single was released to coincide with their 10th anniversary celebrations and, without a supporting tour, failed to set the charts alight. Another single release that suffered from both sides being on the album.

'Do the dirty' is slightly 'spaced out' funk rock. Nicely and tightly arranged, but with largely meaningless lyrics, the band were pandering to the stoned audiences thay had seen on their tours.

'Let's call it quits' showed that the band were absorbing their influences from what was happening around them in the US. In the case of 'Quits', they ended up settling out of court with Allen Toussaints publishers. Despite some very unsubtle innuendoes, the song did respectably in the UK charts, supported by a striking video. If Slade ever showed any signs of being stale, it's on this weary effort.

'Pack up your troubles' is a whole different story. The band again sound like they are enjoying themselves. Paul Prestotino's Dobro guitar adds some very nice slide touches and the acoustically driven song chugs along very nicely with a good-time feeling to it.

'In for a penny' was another single, written in predominantly minor keys and without a chorus. The guitar break that Dave Hill plays on this song has to be one of his finest ever. Harmonium and jazzy sounding bass, plus melodic trademark Slade backing vocals make this an almost irrisistable, if slightly gloomy, record. It charted respectably in the UK, mainly because people were in the habit of buying Slade records and also because they appeared on UK TV to support it.

'Get on up' showed that the band hadn't forgotten at all who they were and what made them great. This took it's place in Slade's live set for a number of years to come. The backing vocals are a definite nod in the direction of the soul style vocals that you would hear on the radio over there (check out David Bowie's 'Young Americans' for a comparison). Again the girls voices (again, Tasha Thomas multi-tracked) enhance the song, rather than detracting from it. One of the album's great successes and practically the only song to survive for any length of time in the Slade live show.

'LA Jinx' deals with problems that the band encountered whenever they played in Los Angeles. The guitars on this are excellent. It doesn't sound at all like the Slade we knew up to this point until the chorus kicks in. If the object of the exercise was to show how different they could be, they were succeeding.

'Did ya mama ever tell ya?' is neat slice of what Nod referred to later as 'Wolverhampton reggae'. The band go all bluebeat on us and Tasha Thomas adds neat backing vocals throughout. A pleasant enough effort. It possibly didn't make sense to UK fans at the time, but it wasn't specifically meant to.

'Scratch my back' is soaked in innuendo and is a restrained rocker, with Nod in fine voice. Dave's guitar style is economical, while Nod's remains simple and solid. Jim's bass playing on the whole record is also simplified from his usual style in an attempt to reach out to US radio.

'I'm a talker' is as far from Slade as it is possible to get - drug and alcohol references abound - this is a party song after all. Only Dave's agile double-tracked guitars remind you that this is Slade. It sounds much more like Noddy Holder guesting on someone else's record.

The final song on the original release; 'All the world is a stage' is many fans favourite on the album. This was a song recgnisable as being by Slade, even though it was mainly keyboard driven. The lyrics are loosely based on odd quotes from Shakespeare and the comments in the booklet accompanying this CD try to make out that the song is 'pretentious'..... well, make your own mind up! Nod bows out , thanking the audience for being wonderful before some familiar sound effects kick in.

Bonus tracks:

'Thanks for the memory' was released shortly after the 'Flame' movie was released and was the single at the time of the 'Flame' tour, just before the band went over to the USA. If it couldn't go on the Flame CD, then it does really belong here. Slade go all instrumentally complex, get some rude lyrics banned and write one of their finest choruses ever. A long song and a great listen. The remastering reveals an extra piano part that seems to have been somewhat submerged in the mix previously.

The b-side to that single was 'Raining in my Champagne'. It features Nod in excellent voice. The band basically reprise 'Twist and shout' to great effect. They sound like they are enjoying themselves.

'Can you just imagine' (the b-side of 'In for a penny') is all about the making of the Slade film 'Flame' and spiritually belongs on that album, even though it was written some time after the film was finished!! A nice tight track, with good lyrics and again a few good Dave Hill guitar parts. Nice to hear a pristine copy again.

'When the chips are down' is another reasonably obscure b-side (to 'Let's call it quits'). The band must have been fond of this song, as they used different lyrics when the song became the theme song for a BBC Insight special ('Six days on the road'). They have obviously jammed their way through this song to get a nice loose feel before the song breaks down into a quiet section towards the end, ended by one of Don Powell's most forceful drum rolls before Nod's voice incites further anarchy. The re-mastering certainly helps this song come across as powerfully as it does.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Slades 'Rubber Soul', 7 Jun 2008
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This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
I believe this is one of slades best albums, it has a variety of styles soft and heavy - the only Slade album my wife will allow me to play in her company. Well remastered and the bonus tracks are all good - brilliant.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Slade 'Nobodys Fool', 15 Feb 2007
This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
This is for me is Slade greatest album, it's packed full of great accomplished rock tunes, every track is excellent, i've had it since release two day's ago and it's been played complete 3 times!

The re-mastering has made it fresh and crisp, no way this is 30 years old!

Not the music you'd think Slade could produce, trust me it's up there with the best. I can forgive the one nursery rhyme track.

Buy it, play it, most of all enjoy it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Still great', 24 April 2012
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This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
I was a big Slade fan, and had all their material up until this record (sold out to punk rock). Now in my late 40's and buying this recording, I'm just realising what I missed from one of the greatest, most under rated, bands of all time. Definatly worth a listen, evenmore with the re-mastered version. I intend to continue updating my 'Slade material'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SNOWBLINDED, 28 Aug 2011
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This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
GREAT CD, A REAL BLAST FROM THE PAST,
THE MIGHTY SLADE AT THERE BEST
FAST FREE DELIVERY, WHAT MORE CAN YOU WANT.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grows on you over the years, 21 Feb 2007
This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
This album is....strange! What were they trying to do? Folk music! Gospel! A confusion of influences, brought about no doubt by Slade's reaction to suddenly being in the States for two years non-stop.

Again Jimmy Lea's musical genius saves the day as he pens another batch of beautifully crafted and catchy pop-songs. The lack of direction is forgiven because the music is so good, and Chas Chandler's crystal-clear production makes this a highly enjoyable if slightly odd album!
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5.0 out of 5 stars its slade you know., 5 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Nobody's Fools (Audio CD)
its a good albumb with some great tracks. i like the added tracks it makes for a better longer listen. the sound of that voice will live for ever.
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