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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unmissable
If you dismiss the premise behind Moulin Rouge (a love story set in Bohemian Paris, told largely through song with scant regard for the restraints of reality) as improbable and almost absurd, you may miss one of the best films of recent years. Only in the skilled hands of Baz Luhrman could such a feat be pulled off: it IS pulled off, and spectacularly so. The film...
Published on 3 Jan 2005 by Beautiful Freak

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Transparent Plot
A great film let down by the first 2 minutes. The narration at the start tells you what is going to happen.
However, a great entertaining film all the same. Making use of modern music to tell the story in what is really a modern Opera, this film has some wonderfull bits. The use of Queen's The show must go On is outstanding. Worth buying
Published on 13 Jan 2008 by N. D. Jervis


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unmissable, 3 Jan 2005
By 
Beautiful Freak (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
If you dismiss the premise behind Moulin Rouge (a love story set in Bohemian Paris, told largely through song with scant regard for the restraints of reality) as improbable and almost absurd, you may miss one of the best films of recent years. Only in the skilled hands of Baz Luhrman could such a feat be pulled off: it IS pulled off, and spectacularly so. The film flickers from the hilarious to the dark and tragic, and despite the unashamed flamboyance and craziness of the world of the Moulin Rouge, no character (except possibly the naïve Christian - Ewan McGregor) is at all simplified. Behind the scenes and beyond the façade of garish physical pleasure that makes up the Moulin Rouge, we see the human face of the buffoon-like Harold Zidler (Jim Broadbent), the secret hopes and dreams of Satine (Nicole Kidman), the giggling courtesan, and the dark and dangerous core of jealousy behind the apparently absurd and utterly ridiculous Duke (Richard Roxburgh.)
The story itself is extremely powerful, and the use of some of the most famous songs of the last thirty years simply gives it wings. The hilarious take on Madonna's Like a Virgin provides one of the funniest moments of the film, and the declaration of love through Elton John's Song, and the following famous love medley (set in and on a giant jewel encrusted elephant, no less, in which the two lovers dance around a miniature Paris to the crooning of a singing moon) must be one of the most romantic declarations of love in any film, ever. This most powerful scene, however, must go to the 'Roxanne' tango number: the kind of stuff that gives you goosebumps up the back of your neck. McGregor and Kidman actually singing always threatened to be a weak link, but they get away with it, and their acting is solid throughout. While Broadbent gives an excellent comic performance two of the best showings are from Caroline O'Connor, as Nini, and John Leguizamo, as Henri Toulouse-Latrec. The fact that neither of these two are in starring roles demonstrates the depth and consistency of talent that make up the fabric of the film.
Most of all, Moulin Rouge is special because of its cinematography: totally lavish colours and lights make up a surreal kaleidoscope of wealth and depravity. At its heart, yes: it's a story about love, overcoming all obstacles. But it's the storytelling itself that makes this among the most memorable films of recent years.
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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unmissable, 8 April 2005
By 
Beautiful Freak (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Moulin Rouge [2001] [DVD] (DVD)
If you dismiss the premise behind Moulin Rouge (a love story set in Bohemian Paris, told largely through song with scant regard for the restraints of reality) as improbable and almost absurd, you may miss one of the best films of recent years. Only in the skilled hands of Baz Luhrman could such a feat be pulled off: it IS pulled off, and spectacularly so. The film flickers from the hilarious to the dark and tragic, and despite the unashamed flamboyance and craziness of the world of the Moulin Rouge, no character (except possibly the naïve Christian - Ewan McGregor) is at all simplified. Behind the scenes and beyond the façade of garish physical pleasure that makes up the Moulin Rouge, we see the human face of the buffoon-like Harold Zidler (Jim Broadbent), the secret hopes and dreams of Satine (Nicole Kidman), the giggling courtesan, and the dark and dangerous core of jealousy behind the apparently absurd and utterly ridiculous Duke (Richard Roxburgh.)
The story itself is extremely powerful, and the use of some of the most famous songs of the last thirty years simply gives it wings. The hilarious take on Madonna's Like a Virgin provides one of the funniest moments of the film, and the declaration of love through Elton John's Song, and the following famous love medley (set in and on a giant jewel encrusted elephant, no less, in which the two lovers dance around a miniature Paris to the crooning of a singing moon) must be one of the most romantic declarations of love in any film, ever. This most powerful scene, however, must go to the 'Roxanne' tango number: the kind of stuff that gives you goosebumps up the back of your neck. McGregor and Kidman actually singing always threatened to be a weak link, but they get away with it, and their acting is solid throughout. While Broadbent gives an excellent comic performance two of the best showings are from Caroline O'Connor, as Nini, and John Leguizamo, as Henri Toulouse-Latrec. The fact that neither of these two are in starring roles demonstrates the depth and consistency of talent that make up the fabric of the film.
Most of all, Moulin Rouge is special because of its cinematography: totally lavish colours and lights make up a surreal kaleidoscope of wealth and depravity. At its heart, yes: it's a story about love, overcoming all obstacles. But it's the storytelling itself that makes this among the most memorable films of recent years.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spectacular Spectacular!!!, 21 Jan 2007
This review is from: Moulin Rouge [2001] [DVD] (DVD)
This is one of the most beautiful and heartwarming films that I have ever seen. Crammed full of emotion, you will feel happy, sad and you will sing along and feel uplifted! This is the ONLY film that I am happy to watch over and over and over again. It never fails to entertain me.

The film follows a young writer (Ewan Macgregor) in Bohemian Paris, where he meets and falls in love with a stunning courtesan (Nicole Kidman)working at the Moulin Rouge, however love does not always end happily ever after. The ending will have a significant impact on you for a long time afterwards. All of the actors play their roles perfectly and the film is a perfect blend of romance, tragedy, dance and comedy.

SO: Make yourself a hot chocolate, grab a box of tissues if you're particularly sensitive and prepare for the biggest movie feast of all time! This film is truly beautiful.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The show will go on forever, 25 Feb 2002
By A Customer
Moulin Rouge is one of those rare forms of entertainment that will entice the audience forever. Just when you thought that musicals were done and dusted, Moulin Rouge comes along and opens up a whole new world of music, glamour, cabarets and love. Baz Lurhman has done an excellent job portraying the life at the world famous nightclub, taking you on an exciting ride with the telling of the story.
Altough the start to the film is rather tedious, you are relieved from this as soon as you are introduced to the Moulin Rouge.The choreography is excellent, fast paced to suit the fast editing and you can't help but love the flamboyant costumes and the excellent soundtrack to accompany the film.
This film is an absolute must to anybody who enjoys a soppy romantic movie. Get out your hankies and relive the magic of the Moulin Rouge forever.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars awesome., 6 July 2007
By 
M. Wearne (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
there is only one word to describe this film and that is... AWESOME. i bought this 3 days ago and have watched it 3 times! i just got totally lost in it! this film is amazing and i recommend it to anyone and everyone!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A bit like Marmite really..., 18 Jan 2004
This review is from: Moulin Rouge [2001] [DVD] (DVD)
You either love it or you hate it. I'm one of those people who love it. The camera work may be overdone in the opening minutes but as the film progresses it slows down to a more enjoyable speed which allows you to take in the full splendor of the lush sets and costumes. The music is wonderfully reworked into a dramtic style and is surprisingly well delivered by the cast. The two leads both have good voices but the actor who surpised me the most was Jim Broadbent, who will make you laugh out loud (or cringe with embarrasment!) in Like a Virgin but who is actually quite touching in The Show Must Go On. The plot, though admitably paper-thin, is relitivly involving and I found myself caring for the fate of these doomed, if somewhat shallow, lovers. The reason for losing a star is partly because the villian of the piece who, dispite the hammy nature of the whole film, is over the top and totally unbelievable (and besides, his eyebrows are a funny shape) but mostly because there are far better versions of this DVD available. If you enjoyed this film I suggest you buy the two-disk DVD or better still, a package of all three of Baz Luhrmans films, which are as good as, if not better than this one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 9 Mar 2002
By A Customer
My favourite film ever from my favourite director. Even though this film is not perfect, somehow I have found myself falling in love with it and going back to watch it again and again at the cinema. As Bas Luhrmann has said in his interviews, this film cannot be enjoyed on a cerebral or ironic level - it works on the level of pure emotion and you either go into the film with an open heart or you else it won't work for you. On that level I think critics have failed to understand just why audiences love this film so much - the film works on the heart, not the head. It's an emotional rollercoater, slashing between comedy and tragedy and it's exhausting, in the most wonderful way! Every time I see this, I leave the cinema feeling so wonderfully uplifted and exalted, which I feel is just what Lurhmann wanted to achieve.
I loved every moment, from the wild, wonderful frenetic editing at the start to the slow, tender emotional love songs in the middle - especially their duet on the elephant where they are singing modern love songs to each other. It assaults the senses on every level - music, acting, visual effects. I could go on about this film forever but I won't - just buy it!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thrilling, audacious masterpiece!, 17 Jan 2002
By A Customer
I've seen this film 11 times now (8 at the cinema and 3 at home with the DVD) and it is still a great joy and delight to me. If I try and analyse why I'm so in love with it - or why it's such a great film - I end up realising that a logical, critical approach doesn't work, and I'm left with the thought that Moulin Rouge is a modern equivalent to a 30s MGM musical: I almost feel that I'm a closet gay man and that the story of Satine and Christian and the Duke and Harold and Toulouse is, when all is said and done, is nothing less than "fabulous". Critical faculties, and the ability to maintain a detached or ironic perspective, are shattered by glamour, pathos, gorgeous orchestral music, truth, beauty, freedom and, above all, love.
In some ways it's easier to see what's wrong with the film rather than what's so great about it: the story is spare and simple (and corny); there's too much frenetic cutting (one Australian reviewer likened it to being trapped in an elevator with a circus); some of the more complex scenes (the "Roxanne" sequence, and the massive "Hindi sad diamonds" denouement) almost fall apart under their own weight; but these are minor concerns when placed against the sheer emotionalism and filmic energy of this crazy masterpiece. Baz Luhrmann has defiantly established himself as a genius -- in an audacious pantheon of genius that includes Jimi Hendrix, Charlie Parker and Orson Welles.
An example of Luhrmann's brilliant touch is his deft combination of humour and pathos: right in the middle of the film's funniest scene (the most outrageous, burlesque take on "Like a Virgin" you'll ever see) he cuts to a deathly-pale Satine being injected after fainting (I'm not giving anything away -- it is revealed to us at the beginning that Satine is doomed). The music abruptly changes from the Rogers and Hammerstein-like treatment of "Virgin" to a few plaintive notes on the piano backed by a muted and ominous orchestra, then it's back to the madness of the Duke and Zidler. Another example is during the movie's love theme, "Come What May": we see Eric Satie joined by an ever-increasing number of bald men, sitting around a piano playing a hauntingly sad and spare Satie-ish melody, before we return to the climax of the love song (and once again Luhrmann demonstrates his brilliant touch: this dramatic part of the song is sung in rehearsal, with Satine and the narcoleptic Argentinean in costume, contrasted by numerous extras, stage-hands and sundry others wandering around).
This is the film where Nicole Kidman really comes into her own. "The Others" has reinforced her standing as an exceptional film actress, but in that film she was playing a restricted, neurotic character. In Moulin Rouge she runs the gamut of emotions from A to Z: she's beautiful, she's sexy, she's doomed, she's in love. She is just as striking when her face is presented to us as a vision of grief and despair, tears running down her cheeks, as when she is resplendent in gorgeous stage costumes or her "seduction outfit".
Nicole is the greatest of the stars but McGregor is very good as the young and idealistic Christian: he has genuine charm when he sings "Your Song" to Satine and there is real pathos with his tears at the shock of Satine's death. Jim Broadbent is perfect as Harold Zidler, the impresario, who is both manipulative and sympathetic. Richard Roxburgh is hilarious as the Duke but is also able to invest the mainly caddish role with real complexity, as evinced by his dejected posture after uttering "My dear, a little frog" to a besotted Satine: while he is the nasty villain - "a powerful man" with a homicidal manservant Warner - he displays some of the vulnerability of being in love. Those four - Satine, Christian, the Duke and Harold, are the main characters, but John Leguizamo is charmingly affecting as Toulouse-Lautrec (another small gripe I have with the scenario is that we are never reminded that Toulouse was a painter and a very great painter at that), and there are some juicy cameos by Garry McDonald (who utters the classic line "I don't think a nun would say that about a hill") and David Wenham, unrecognisable sans beard and with a black wig.
The music is luscious and a real delight: "Nature Boy" is all pathos and even dread; "Your Song" is sweepingly romantic and thrilling; "One Day I'll Fly Away" is simply stunningly gorgeous; "Elephant Love Medley" is excitingly surprising as we recognise the post-modernist take on such pop classics as "Heroes" and "I Will Always Love You" (on top of that, Luhrmmann chucks in operatic flourishes willy-nilly); "Like a Virgin" is a burlesque masterpiece; "Come What May" is anthemic, corny and irresistible; and "Hindi Sad Diamonds" is a thumping dance track set against the most stunning tableau you'll ever see staged.
It's important to get the DVD for the quality of sound and vision. The extras are many and good but nothing beats just sitting down again, to share with another friend, the joy of this great movie. I'm looking forward to the next "screening" already!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ****SPECTACULAR****, 11 Dec 2004
Baz Lurhmann's third movie in the 'Red Curtain' trilogy has finally arrived. Moulin Rouge is set to be the next 'big thing'. With an all-star cast, I have no reason to doubt that this enticing film will go all the way to the top.
It is Paris, 1899, and romantic poet, Christian (Ewan McGregor) goes to Paris to join the Bohemian way of living. He begins going to the notorious club, the Moulin Rouge. From the moment he sets eyes on the clubs star, Satine (Nicole Kidman), he falls madly in love with her, and she returns his feelings. But with a jealous man and a serious disease hot on their tails, will they ever be together?
Luhrmann creates plenty of amusement throughout the film. Whateve you think is funny, you are bound to find something that will tickle your funny bone, and you can guarantee plenty of laughs.
I also thoroughly enjoyed the way it is modernised. Lurhmann made old meet young very well. The old fashioned dresses to modern songs create bizarre atmosphere. At times it felt like you were watching a party, yet sometimes, like you were watching circus clowns.
However, Lurhmann was unsuccessful in creating suspense. The entire plot is revealed within the first ten minutes of the film. It ruins the end and I almost thought it silly to keep watching until the end. Not only that but I was also unimpressed with the atrocious, unrealistic effects. Cameras flew in from all angles that it was like being on a roller coaster. It made me feel dizzy and nauseas and was frankly, quite pointless.
I could not complain about the main actors though, Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor portray Satine and Christian excellently. They prove to the world that they are not only great actors, but they can sing. I can safely say that it is them actually singing and they are both very talented people.
Other characters include, Toulouse-Lautrec, whose performance is less creditable. Although John Leguizmo portrays him with humour, he doesn't really do much. Richard Roxburgh's evil duke is rather shallow, but these characters are minor and don't spoil the experience.
And, of course, holding the film together is the collection of songs. Which range from classics to pop songs, including remixes of Madonna, Elton John, Nirvana and an upbeat rendition of 'Diamonds are a girls best friend'. And watch out for a cameo from a very special guest!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I almost switched it off ..., 10 Oct 2004
By A Customer
I confess to ordering Moulin Rouge as part of a free DVD trial offer to try and get the 'good stuff' activated on my list quicker. But my husband came home from a hard week at college needing something to empty his mind and he put this film on.
I sat squirming with embarrassment for about 15 minutes before asking him to turn it off. Fortunately he ignored me and told me to stick with it. He was right! It has to be one of the most sumptuous, jaw-dropping, hilarious and energetic films I have seen for a very long time. One of many highlights has to be Richard Roxburgh and Jim Broadbent playing the unctuous Duke and the seedy but captivating Zigler in their fabulous cover of Like a Virgin (I particularly liked the jellies!).
This film is so full of texture, colour and life that you are drawn in and lost in the brilliance of it. The actors are also good and complement each other wonderfully. The only problem with the film was that it finished too soon - but we made up for it by (sadly) watching it again immediately afterwards, and then again the following day, and we have now ordered our own copy!
Apologies if the above superlatives appear excessive, but for once they seem justified. Enough to prompt me to submit my first ever review after using Amazon for years.
For me Moulin Rouge provided pure, unashamed escapism that catapulted me straight out of a week filled with sad news stories, and reminded me that, even if the story is ultimately a tragic one, life really does contain things that can make you grin from ear to ear!
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Moulin Rouge - Definitive Edition [DVD]
Moulin Rouge - Definitive Edition [DVD] by Baz Luhrmann (DVD - 2007)
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