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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent DVD for Ridley Scott classic
Fans of Ridley Scott’s 1979 science fiction classic ‘Alien’ could surely not ask for a better DVD release than this. The ‘Star Wars’ films and Tim Burton’s ‘Planet of the Apes’ may surpass this release in sheer quantity of extras, but you really feel than time has been taken over making the contents of this DVD as...
Published on 17 May 2003 by Mr. A. L. Morris

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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Alien DE - excellent film,shame it isn't the Steelbook DE though1!!
Alien is one of the best scifi films, not much can be said about it's awesomeness, especially this cut w/ DTS!
However - I once again fell victim to the "non-steelbook edition" syndrome that has been haunting these Definitive Edition DVDs recently (see Robocop DE) hence the 3* rating - the piccie here definitely shows the steelbook version. I received a standard card...
Published on 17 Feb 2008 by J. BLIGHT


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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent DVD for Ridley Scott classic, 17 May 2003
By 
Mr. A. L. Morris "andrew_l_m" (Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Alien [DVD] [1979] (DVD)
Fans of Ridley Scott’s 1979 science fiction classic ‘Alien’ could surely not ask for a better DVD release than this. The ‘Star Wars’ films and Tim Burton’s ‘Planet of the Apes’ may surpass this release in sheer quantity of extras, but you really feel than time has been taken over making the contents of this DVD as interesting as possible.
I must confess to not finding this film scary in the slightest scary. As a result, I have been more interested in the first half, in which Scott deftly creates atmosphere and foreboding, and the intelligent script sets up the relationships between the characters with great subtlety. The film becomes a little more formulaic after the ‘chest busting’ scene, but there are still surprises, and I admire he way that Scott is content not to play all of his cards at once, never really revealing the alien completely. The film’s originality and brilliance are undoubtable.
The picture and sound on this DVD are uniformly excellent. The picture has been specially cleaned up, and the refined sound allows us to appreciate the dramatic contrasts that are created with the minutely detailed sound effects, particularly in the contrast between the noise of the planet, and the eerie silence of the ship.
Ridley Scott provides an interesting and informative commentary, in which he explains technical aspects of the film, as well as explaining how certain problems were solved within the budgetary constraints. He is full of anecdotes about the shooting of the film and about working with the excellent actors.
Other extras include some deleted scenes, most interesting of which is a scene in which Ripley visits the alien cocoon. It is easy to see why many of the scenes were left out of the finished film, as many are slightly superfluous, and in many cases, the characterisation which they were intended to bring is easily achieved in the completed film.
As well as some slightly repetitious trailers, there is some brilliant conceptual art work from H R Giger and others, and perhaps most surprising of all is the amazing set of storyboards drawn by Ridley Scott, which were good enough to convince the studio to double the film’s budget. There is also a set of production stills which effectively show the process of making the film.
Another rarely encountered feature is the option of isolated music track, which showcases the wonderful score by Jerry Goldsmith (although its similarity to his score for the same year’s ‘Star Trek: The Motion Picture’ did put me off slightly), as well as the option for production sound track, which includes eventually unused music and pre mixed sound as the actors heard it, and it throws up a few previously unheard surprises.
Overall, this is a very good DVD of a very good film; perhaps my only wish is that there had been a ‘making of’ documentary. Ah well, you can’t have everything.
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5.0 out of 5 stars SciFi Horror masterpiece, 30 Nov 2013
By 
still searching (MK UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Alien [DVD] [1979] (DVD)
What more is there to say about Scott's masterpiece that hasn't already been said? Not a lot I suspect. Basically, it's `an old dark house' murder mystery but set aboard a monstrous spacecraft, `Nostromo', returning to Earth from the farther reaches of the galaxy laden with 20,000,000 tonnes of mineral ores from distant planets. The inhabitants are in suspended animation allowing them to survive the equally monstrous periods of time involved in traversing such mind numbing distances. In the opening scene we, the ghostly viewers travel through the vast ship along empty corridors, accompanied by the almost subliminal sounds of the ship's engines and machinery, until we reach the life support chamber in which the crew sleep unsuspectingly. There is one jarring moment here: no-one else is on board and we, the omniscient viewers, do not have to open doors through which to travel and yet, in order to enter the chamber in which the crew are ensconced in their life support systems, doors slide open with the faintest of sounds as if air has entered with us, and then close behind us! It's a minor thing but jarring none the less!

Slowly, within their life support pods, the crew begins to stir and the second in command, Kane (John Hurt) is the first to awaken from his enforced slumbers. The pod canopies open. He sits up, slowly opens his eyes and then gets up. Gradually, the others begin to show signs of life. Cut to the next scene in which the crew is at breakfast sharing cereals and coffee and chit-chatting about mundane things like bonuses, which is a particular `beef' with maintenance engineer, Parker (Yaphet Kotto), and his side kick, Brett (Harry Dean Stanton). In the midst of this ordinary domestic scene, in which navigator, Lambert (Veronica Cartwright) has a towel draped around her neck as if just having left the shower, the ship's captain, Dallas (Tom Skerritt) is alerted to a signal from the ship's computer, Mother, by Science Officer, Ash, (Ian Holm). He goes to investigate. Upon his return he tells the other members of the crew that the ship is only halfway home and the crew have been woken to attend to a signal of unknown origin coming from a strange planetoid, which has a gravitational field 0.86 that of Earth's. They land about 2000 m from the signal origin during severe weather sustaining damage to their landing gear and we learn that the ambient conditions are dreadful with a primordial atmosphere and temperature well below zero. Nevertheless, the captain decides they have to investigate, since it's part of their contract, and assigns Kane and Lambert to accompany him.

It is then that the film's title registers in our consciousness. The alien ship from which the signal emanates is like nothing the crew or we have seen before. This feeling is enhanced when we get inside. The alien ship, created by the Swiss artist, H. R. Giger is cavernous, of enormous proportions and has a strange unearthly geometry, reminiscent of that described by H. P. Lovecraft in his weird tales, principally, The Mountains of Madness. Eventually they find one of the ship's alien crew members, presumably, in the main deck area. The crew member is also enormous by human standards and, with a huge open gash in its abdominal region, looks as if it has been dead for a very long time. They leave the main deck to investigate elsewhere, which is where they find what appear to be hundreds of large leathery pouches beneath a blue gaseous haze. This scene, which shows Kane descending on a line into the vast cavernous chamber containing the `pouches', is truly awesome evoking that upon first seeing the inside of the Krell's huge machine in `Forbidden Planet'! Of course, we now know the results of Kane's curiosity and its implications for him and the rest of the crew!

On their return, third in command, Ripley (the superb Sigourney Weaver), back up in the main deck area, can remotely operate the air lock to allow them entry. Sensibly she refuses citing the standing orders regarding quarantine. Ominously, Ash overrides her objections by manually operating the doors to the air lock - and the rest is (movie) history!

The film has everything including a few irritations; for example, in addition to that mentioned earlier, there is the sound of the ship's engines outside in empty space where we should hear nothing. This is annoying since the movie makes a big deal of the fact that `in space no one can hear you scream'! But these are minor compared to its many accomplishments. The opening title sequence vividly sets the tone, the screenplay is brilliant, the editing taught, the acting excellent, the production design literally out of this world and the twist towards the end that is no longer quite so surprising still manages, also quite literally, to pack a visceral punch! And then there is the brilliantly evocative score by Jerry Goldsmith that incorporates, seamlessly, passages of Howard Hanson's 2nd symphony, The Romantic.

Along with Scott's other masterwork, released three years later, Blade Runner, this should be on anyone's list of all-time great SiFi/horror/fantasy masterpieces.

I'm only really concerned with the original movie and can take or leave the sequels but the Blu-ray 4 disc anthology, for the price, is also ridiculously inexpensive too!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Absolute Modern Classic, 4 July 2014
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This review is from: Alien [DVD] [1979] (DVD)
This film is a modern classic. The acting and improv scenes are second to none. The effects, despite their age, have stood the test of time. The story - an alien stowaway picking off the crew of a deep space mining vessel - is as riveting today as it was upon release. No wonder this film has a massive fan base. Just to mention again about the brilliant, naturalistic acting here - when I think of THE best acting I have ever seen in any film, the cast of Alien always springs immediately to mind. Wonderful, wonderful cinema.
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33 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lucas Take Note, 11 Mar 2004
By 
R. L. Ricketts "lee" (South Africa) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Quite frankly, this is the ultimate in customer care. A number of us do not want Alien 3 & 4, so did not buy the box set. by releasing them seperatley, you get to buy just the ones you want.
A very nice feature is being able to choose between the original issue of the film or the new version. George Lucas, take note of this with your imminent Star Wars releases please.
The remastered print is amazing - visual and audio quality superb.
The extras are too numerous to list here - an outstanding example of how to reissue a classic film properly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The film that started it all, 31 Aug 2013
This review is from: Alien [DVD] [1979] (DVD)
I'm writing this review not because I think `Alien' needs another 5* review, but because I read a post on an internet message board by someone saying, `I can't believe this piece of junk is considered scary!'

So, I re-watched Alien, trying to see if I could see where this poster was coming from. I guess there are now two types of viewers. The first - like me - grew up on Alien in the late seventies/early eighties, where it was one of the most ahead of its time films ever made. It started off the whole `monster-munching' movie genre, where a lone creature stalks and eliminates a team/crew/whatever one by one. There have been countless B-movies made since its release in 1979 which have tried - unsuccessfully - recapture its look, feel and financial viability, but pretty much all have failed.

Then you have the new generation - those who have grown up with `Avatar' as the `normal' quality of film. It's fair to say that Avatar is a vastly superior film to Alien, but only because it has the budget etc. If you're used to seeing thousands of alien creatures fighting over a mystical landscape, watching a single creature (which, as some times, comes across very much as a bloke in a suit) jump out of the darkness about five times in two hours, comes as a bit of a let-down.

However, when it comes to purity, Alien will beat pretty much every movie ever made (even its highly-regarded successor, `Aliens,' which - although also excellent, is not as pure as the original, as it blends genres more).

If you know Alien and generally appreciate horror and/or science-fiction, you'll probably already love it. However, if you're new to the genre and primarily are used to modern filming techniques, you may have to put yourself in the place of the audiences back in 1979, who had never seen such a claustrophobic and tense piece of horror.

The xenomorph itself, now looking a little dated (in my opinion the dragon-thing at the end of Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland looked more horrific!) may not cut it compared with modern special effects, but - again - it was way ahead of its time. Alien will stand the test of (cinematic) time. Film history will always have a place of it (and Aliens), just don't go thinking that films have always been made the way Avatar and Lord of the Rings have.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ULTIMATE EDITION, 6 Aug 2004
By 
Fabio (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This is the ultimate masterpiece in DVD perfection of the film ALIEN. A science fiction/horror/thriller classic. I have been waiting 25 years for this amount of detail to be avialable. The interviews with Ridley Scott, Dan O'Bannon, H.R. Giger, Ron Cobb, etc are excellent & comprehensive. The remastered picture quality was superb. The access menu background with the face huggers in the eggs looks superb. Having the option to access the orginal 1979 film & the new director's cut is the icing on the perfect cake. I agree with another reviewer that the new Star Wars DVD's should have this option. All special, collectors & Directors Cut DVD's should be of this standard. I purchased this DVD from Amazon when it was selling around the 10.00 mark. Nice one, Amazon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 23 July 2013
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I love the movie and I love this DVD, I haven't watched the extra features, but they look great. The DVD was in great condition and I'm very happy. The deleted scenes were awesome if you ask me :P I got told I'm a geek but a proud one!
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ALIEN BLU-RAY, 25 Jun 2012
By 
A. Page (Norwich, Norfolk, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Alien [Blu-ray] [1979] (Blu-ray)
Brilliant! Click on a Blu-Ray and get 200 reviews of a DVD!! I've said it before and I'll say it again, C'mon Amazon sort it out, how hard is it to seperate the reviews. I like most fans of the Alien films have the Anthology on Blu-Ray and I watched Alien last night. All I can say is WOW, I can't comment for those of you who have a TV the size of a wall but on mine the amazing transfer made it look like a film released this year, so crisp, clean and no grain that I could see. I think I love this film even more now than I loved it already and I can't wait to watch the other 3.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ALIEN - A HORROR CLASSIC, 17 Mar 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Alien [DVD] [1979] (DVD)
When I realised that Alien was going to be released on DVD, fully restored and with brilliant extras, I didn't delay in purchasing it. Either should you. This film is often described as Ridley Scott's Fright Machine - an endless foray of atmosphere, startling images and genuinely terrifying moments. The DVD features give the film itself justice, it includes great insights into the production of the film and Scott's commentary is really interesting and actually helpful to the audience. The disc also includes some fantastic deleted scenes - most notably a scene where Riply encounters Dallas cocooned and is forced to burn him.
The two sequels which followed this classic (lets forget the abyssmal Alien Resurrection shall we) were fantastic, but don't match the horror and sheer ferocity of this. The film made stars of Sigourney Weaver and Ridley Scott and became a milestone of the horror genre at the time. It is without doubt one of the best films of the productive 1970's, and still haunts audiences today. I'll give you two reasons why you should buy this. Number One - to witness the scene on DVD where Dallas is chased by Alien in the the air vent, boy that's scary! Number Two - it would fit into any proper DVD collection out there. Enjoy.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliance on a budget, 19 Jan 2004
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This review is from: Alien [DVD] [1979] (DVD)
This superb film makes a mockery out of the "megabuck" sci-fi attempts that have followed it, including I'm afraid its own follow-ups.
I can remember watching it in the cinema when it came out and therein lies the only problem, it is far better watched on the big screen.
Its portrayal of a spaceship as a Damp and grimy hulk was a revelation at the time when white plastic and spandex suits were what the future was supposed to look like !
All made on a small budget in the U.K. it is simply the best sci-fi horror ever made.
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Alien - Definitive Edition [DVD] [1979]
Alien - Definitive Edition [DVD] [1979] by Ridley Scott (DVD - 2007)
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