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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Change, change, change...
For this review, the best way to get around this boxset is to review each serial separately:

-'The Keeper of Traken' brings the events in this 'mini saga' to a start. Even though 'Keeper is the weakest story of the three, it still has much to offer. Geoffrey Beaver's brilliant portrayal of the villain is truely spectacular. And, of course, there's also Anthony...
Published on 20 Aug. 2007 by Calculus

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars First Story is Very Good
Keeper of Traken

What a lovely story. What a lovely production. It's like a late Shakespeare - Winters Tale or Cymbeline, possibly with a dash of All's Well and MND. The script is finely lyrical, and the design graciously opulent.

Some fine performances, not just from the front line of Anthony Ainley, John Woodnutt (always good value) and Sheila...
Published 18 months ago by Alex Lyon


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Three good tales, each with the Master!!!!, 18 July 2007
By 
Mrs. L. Studd - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
New Beginnings is the best DVD deal you may ever find.
It contains:

THE KEEPER OF TRAKEN:
From one Master to, yes, another.

LOGOPOLIS:
TARDIS within TARDIS, the Doctor falling off a giant telescope and the Master! All concluding with the Doctor regenarating.

CASTROVALVA:
Peter Davison's exciting debut as the Doctor and one hell of a briiliant Doctor Who story.

Buy the New Beginnings boxset and prepare to be transformed in the way you think about DOCTOR WHO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good value package. <<Review includes spoilers>>, 7 Mar. 2007
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This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
The Keeper of Traken has an excellent story. The history of the arrival of Melkur is well-told, and put a shiver down my spine.

The Master is not as physically hideous as he was in The Deadly Assassin (where his goggle-eyed, decayed face almost made me throw up!). Geoffrey Beevers says he insisted on using a less restrictive mask so he could act with his eyes.

Logopolis is a partially symbolic tale. It's clear that the city is modelled on a microprocessor, with references to machine code, arithmetic/logic units, and so on. The story involves some dubious scenes - such as measuring the police box exterior dimensions, but I note that it was such things that I found most fascinating as a child.

There are classic scenes, such as the Doctor's Tardis materialising within the Master's, which has already materialised around a Police Box - Leading to an infinite regression of Tardises within Tardises, getting gloomier and gloomier as the levels are descended.

Castrovalva, Peter Davison's debut, is a very interesting story that loses out because of budget limitations. You can picture how Castrovalva itself was supposed to look, with its Escher references, but some of the realisation is poor, as acknowledged in some of the extra features. Still, the Tardis interior scenes are well done. I found the opening up of the Doctor's ship fascinating.

Adric, Tegan, and Nyssa are less annoying that my memories of them. I now see them (particularly Adric and Nyssa) as youngsters, of whom my tolerance is greater than my previous view of them as young adults.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Doctor Who - New Beginnings (1981-1982) - Farewell to the 4th Doctor and a Big Hallo to the 5th Doctor., 3 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
In 28th of December 1974, Tom Baker came onto Doctor Who with great enthusiasm, and both producer Phillip Hinchcliffe and script writer Robert Holmes brought the new 4th Doctor to the great TV audiences. During 1974 to 1981, the 4th Doctor (Tom Baker) and his companions Sarah Jane Smith (Elizabeth Sladen), Harry Sullivan (Ian Marter), Leela (Louise Jameson), Romana I (Mary Tamm), Romana II (Lalla Ward), K-9 (Voiced by John Leeson and David Briarley), Adric (Matthew Waterhouse), Nyssa (Sarah Sutton) and Tegan (Janet Fielding) battle Daleks, Cybermen, Sontarians, and other alien menaces. But after 7 years all good comes to an end, and as the last lines said by the 4th Doctor on 21st March 1981, "It the end, but the moment has been prepared for", and it was. John Nathan Turner prepared for the biggest gamble in Doctor Who's TV history, and he wonder if new Doctor `Peter Davison' could pull off. The answer was `Yes'.

The main cast of Tom Baker (The 4th Doctor), Peter Davison (The 5th Doctor), Adric (Matthew Waterhouse), Nyssa (Sarah Sutton) and Tegan (Janet Fielding) all shine in all of the three adventures - Tom Baker's second last adventure `The Keeper of Traken', Tom Baker's 4th Doctor's Swansong `Logopolis' and Peter Davison's 5th Doctor debut `Castrovalva'. In these three adventures the supporting cast of John Woodnutt (Seron (`The Keeper of Traken')), Margot Van Der Burgh (Katura (`The Keeper of Traken')), Robin Soames (Luvic (`The Keeper of Traken')), Dennis Carey (The Old Keeper (`The Keeper of Traken')), Sheila Ruskin (Kassia (`The Keeper of Traken')), John Fraser (The Monitor (`Logopolis')), Tom Georgeson (The Police Inspector (`Logopolis')), Dolore Whiteman (Aunt Vanessa (`Logopolis')), Dallas Cavell (The 'Pharios Project' Security Chief (Castrovalva)), Frank Wylie (Ruther (`Castrovalva')), Star Wars and future Grange Hill legend Michael Sheard (Mergrave (`Castrovalva')), and Derek Waring (Shardovan (`Castrovalva')) also shine in these three epic adventures, but the biggest acting glories goes to Anthony Ainley who transformed from kind heart Tremas (Nyssa's father) to the evil and even more dark hearted 'The Master' all shine in these classic adventures that demonstrates the change of direction for the series with a new Doctor and new companions piloting the TARDIS.

To all new and existing Whovians, please get this triple boxset as it says goodbye to the 4th Doctor (Tom Baker), and hello to the 5th Doctor (Peter Davison), and in January 1982, Peter Davison's 5th Doctor brought the reviewing figures to over 10 million, and re-vamped and revived the series. Peter Davison's First Series as the Fifth Doctor was huge and only highlight of John Nathan Turner's career as producer of Doctor Who, and its a pity that he changed the programme format from 1985 to 1989 into a rubbish third rate pantomime resulting in viewers turning off.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty ordinary fare, 18 July 2012
By 
Anon (Cyberspace) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
While I like the Master as a nemesis of the Doctor, three episodes in a row about him was about two too many. I am quite shocked so many have written such positive reviews, it is a boxset I could quite easily watch once and only watch again if I was watching my complete collection from start to finish

'The Keeper Of Trakken' promised to be a good story, but the overall plot was not strongly supported. I personally feel the Melkor could have been a good story in its own right. It is very slow paced, you can more or less see the way the plot is going and there isn't much in it at all.

'Logopolis' was a decent enough story without many strengths. I never did like the inside of the TARDIS displayed as gardens and brickwork, to me it should be like portrayed in much of the Peter Davison era - it is a spaceship after all. This story had a little bit of intrigue, all three did, but very much underexploited. The climax seemed a rather limp conclusion, it did see the Doctor regenerate which is one of the few and indeed earliest memories I have of Doctor Who having had a childhood which made regular TV slot watching hard, and as I gather now difficult enough without TV guides (which we didn't have except at Christmas)

'Castrovalva' was a slow paced, clever in places, story which again could have delivered more and maybe a lot quicker. I agree with those who found seeing the inside of the TARDIS exciting, I feel as hollow inside as the TARDIS with the loss of rooms and feel some other solution to the fix may have been better - or the loss only temporary. Like the previous two stories the plot had oodles of potential and much of it was untouched.

I don't regret buying these, I would like eventually to have all Peter Davison's stories and am currently only five shy of said ambition, sadly there are only 20 "to collect". Maybe after the long stint of Tom Baker, the short stints of 20, 11 and 12 stories per subsequent Doctor, and their fading character appeal as Doctors, was a precursor to the eventual demise. I love the 80s feel to a lot of his stories, the way TV and films were done in those days puts to shame the later and current approaches which are too techno-centric and lack solid plots.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Boring, Good, Excellent - In that order!, 9 Dec. 2010
By 
matty9896 (Grays, Essex) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
This box set is well worth it. Not the best stories of all time, but still some very important episodes in the show's history.

THE KEEPER OF TRAKEN (*)
Selling Point: Grand return of the Master.
I'm sorry, but I dislike this story. In fact, it is probably my all-time least favourite. I cannot even bring myself to write a proper review of this story. It starts off alright, but after about 10 minutes it is mind-numbingly boring. I've only watched this one once. Not exciting at all. That's my opinion, anyway.

LOGOPOLIS (****)
Selling Point: Tom Baker's final story.
After the false start of The Keeper of Traken, this story is somewhat of a godsend. It starts off really well with the introduction of Tegan, with her heading off on her first day of work as an air hostess (which actually becomes quite an important scene in subsequent stories...). It goes on with some small revelations about the TARDIS, with the introduction of the cloister bell and some chat about the chameleon circuit. They then head off to the planet of Logopolis (pronounced LOG-OP-O-LISS, as I learned whilst watching this story, and to my horror I realised I had been pronouncing it wrong all this time!), where they find The Master boycotting the most important mathematical equations in the universe. After some stuff about the universe being erased, the Fourth Doctor falls off a satellite dish and regenerates with a touching final line. (I've forgotten all the details!)

CASTROVALVA (*****)
Selling Point: Peter Davison's debut.
I am actually quite fond of this story. We get to explore the TARDIS, and there is a good mystery in the last 45mins of the story. I wont spoil the plot for you, as its the best of the set. A highly recommended watch!

Tom Baker is his usual Season 18 self (i.e. miserable), Peter Davison is nice and chirpy, Adric is his usual self, as are Tegan and Nyssa.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Ask not for whom the Cloister Bell tolls.", 19 Dec. 2007
This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
The end of Uncle Tom and the start of Peter D. Of the stories themselves, the bookends are wonderful "Keeper of Traken" and "Castrovalva", but the middle 1, Logopolis is a little weak.

Keeper is a fun magical story with a mix of Star Trek style cod science and Midsummer Night's Dream . There are good performances especially from newcomers to the ensemble Anthony Ainley & Sarah Sutton and guest stars such as Sheila Ruskin, John Woodnut, Dennis Carey & Margot Van de Burgh. Ruskin & de Burgh in particular play their roles with just the right amount of Gravitas.

The story moves well and is notable for the double return of the Master 1st in an underrated performance by Geoffrey Beevers and then as Anthony Ainley takes the role for the stinger at the end. The only odd touch is revealing the Master as he turns round in his chair an emaciated figure, because viewers who had not seen the Master's last story, would not have known who he is.

Logopolis carries straight on and although good has 2 episodes in which time is wasted as we only hear the Master's laugh but never see him, the Doctor measures a Police box the tries to flush out the Master by submerging the tardis underwater (although this is aborted) and generally the story goes nowhere. It picks up in the last 2 episodes with new companion Tegan making a good impression and the sense of futility over the Master wreaking havoc coming across well.

Some ideas just don't develop as well as they could e.g. Tardis within a Tardis and the Watcher but there's still lots to enjoy, perhaps not the finale Tom deserved though.

Castrovalva is a fine start for Davison and moves a lot better than Logopolis. Again guests stars are good and the Master is awol for half the story, except he isn't-see the story and you'll get my meaning.

This time the visualisation of the ideas due to limitations at the time lets the story down a little, but the ideas still work well on the whole. The Doctor's post regenerative illness is a good touch as is the ersatz inhabitants of Castrovalva not questioning how a house can be in more than 1 place at the same time, and their final breaking of their restrictions to defy The Master is touching.

Extras are marvellous a documentary on the making of Traken, and a show piece covering Baker's departure and Davison's arrival. Both men and the other interviewee's are on good form. especially fun is Tom's remembrance of how difficult he'd become. The shorter pieces "Return of the Master" & "The Crowded Tardis", should have been a bit longer although Fiona Cumming's "Directing Castrovalva" works well. there are also Interviews with Davison on Swap Shop, Pebble Mill & Blue Peter.

Commentaries include Ainley's only ever commentary for Traken a "Tommentary" for Logopolis plus Davison and Janet Fielding for Castrovalva. Nice extra touches include an easter egg of Davison at the Lord Mayor's show & a tribute to Ainley at the end of Traken as we see him sign off dressed as the Master ( from recording the Master bits for computer game "Destiny of the Doctors")and then an "in memory of" title card comes up.

A class act!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They don't get any better than this, 11 July 2007
By 
D. Chandler (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
A wonderful trilogy that bridges the transition from the best Doctor of them all (Tom Baker) to the equally brilliant Peter Davison. The stories all involve The Master, played superbly by Anthony Ainley, who made the role all his own and eclipsed his predecessors with ease. Keeper of Traken kicks off the action, with the evil Melkur offering a suitable challenge to The Doctor and his cheeky sidekick, Adric. The story features some wonderful guest stars, including the excellent John Woodnutt, who never fails to brighten a scene. Logopolis follows and it's a story that superbly builds-up to the regeneration of Tom Baker into Peter Davison. A tense, moody atmosphere is present throughout and Tom Baker is joined by some wonderful new companions to help him on his way. Once again, Anthony Ainley steals the show. Just when you think it can't get any better, Castrovalva takes us on a rollercoaster ride as the new Doctor battles The Master for supremacy in the ancient citadel of the title. Peter Davison makes a confident debut and engages with veiwers straight-away. He is aided by a cracking guest cast and another star-turn from Mr Ainley. If you liked the new series story 'New Earth', you'll find these stories hit the target.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mixed feelings, 3 July 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
The Keeper Of Traken has some good moments but overall its a boring show. The Master is nowhere as good as the original Master played by Roger Delgado back in the early 1970s. Apparently Tom Baker was well and trully over being Doctor Who according to a very revealing interview on one of the bonus DVDs. It shows his disenchantment with these last 2 shows of Baker in Doctor Who.
The deliberate change in Doctor Who by the producers killed the program in my opinion and it NEVER recovered after these episodes. This box set is the end of an era.
Logopolis is similar to the keeper of traken in which the Master is heavilly involved, difference in this Master compared to the Pertwee era is the new Master is not believeable, he just isn't in the same league or has the same presence.
The storys also were not as interesting and used too much technical talk.
As a teenager in the 1970s I simply lost intrest of a show I loved after Tom left.
Peter Davidson is a great actor but he was not Doctor Who to me.
This is a good box to get to finalise your Doctor Who collection. I am still excited with the DVDs of the early shows but do not own a single DVD of any Doctor Who produced after 1981.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stunning Conclusion. Stunned Beginning, 29 April 2007
By 
JA Fairhurst "johnfair" (Edgeley, Stockport) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
New Beginnings

This DVD collection consists of the final two Tom Baker stories - 'The Keeper of Traken' and 'Logopolis' and the first broadcast story of Peter Davison's reign as the Doctor (see the additional features for an explanation...) 'Castrovalva'.

The three stories all run consecutively in internal chronology.

'The Keeper of Traken' sees the Doctor and Adric back in N space where the TARDIS is invaded by the Keeper of Traken, who informs the Doctor that he must see that the succession is carried through with the minimum of disruption to Traken's internal harmony.
Traken society is somewhat more stratified than one may think ideal for such a perfect Union, and the way in which the Gardeners are bribed by all sides also doesn't appear to bode well for the future tranquillity of the civilisation either.

'Logopolis' takes us to Earth and this story is, perhaps, one of the top three most significant stories in the Doctor Who canon as the long running Tom Baker is replaced by the incoming Peter Davison. It's also the first story to feature the rejuvenated Master from start to finish, though I have to say that I prefer Anthony Ainley as Tremus in 'The Keeper of Traken' - the Master's crazed laughter was just a bit too crazed to be comfortable...
The model work was nice, particularly of the Pharos Project (based on Jodrell Bank) and we are introduced to Tegan, the latest of the Doctor's companions, and the first of her ill-fated relatives. We're also presented with Nyssa as a regular companion. The final regenerations scene, where we get to see many of the Fourth Doctor's companions and enemies is nicely handled and the Watcher's mysterious presence throughout this story is made clear.

'Castrovalva' sees the Doctor's 5th incarnation having a rough time integrating his new personality and he heads off to the Zero Room while he settles in. but disaster overtakes him and the TARDIS. The two girls try their best to guide the TARDIS to a safe destination while also trying to hide the fact that Adric has been kidnapped by the Master.
But is the place they find all it seems to be?
This story is one of the more trippier stories, especially in the courtyard scene where the women are asked which way the exit lay. Or where the librarian and the pharmacist were asked where their domains lay and they pointed to places on all four sides of the city.

Each of the various disks contain a number of interviews with the various actors and members of the production team, which are actually quite illuminating - not always the case.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nostalgia Overload, 12 Feb. 2007
By 
This review is from: Doctor Who - New Beginnings (The Keeper of Traken/Logopolis/Castrovalva) [DVD] [1963] (DVD)
First of all, if you were born early 1970s, are a Doctor Who fan, and have a fair recollection of seeing these stories first time (I was 7/8 years old and a big fan) then this set of dvds will blow you away completely. The features, oh, the features. This is the kind of thing that makes you gasp at how good it is. My memories of watching the later Tom Baker stories was my family would go to my Nans on a Saturday evening and I would often be dismissed upstairs to watch the Doc on a portable in my Nans bedroom (in colour thankfully) because my Nan was scared of it(!) but I'm pretty sure I saw the regeneration on a 'proper' screen.

The biggest thing that impressed me (I impress easily maybe) was that one of the extra features on each disc, is the continuity announcements and the BBC trailers for EACH episode. This means you see the old BBC revolving globe, hear terribly posh announcers announcing the programme and also see "tonight on BBC1" trailers where the other Saturday night highlights were Tom & Jerry and The Kelly Monteith show (who?). Its all so scarey as it comes back to you when you watch it. Almost like being there again, in my Nan's living room.

The continuity announcements are shown as a seperate thing, to the actual episodes, so they show the lead in and lead out with a few seconds of the titles but you really get the feel of it. Its great.

On Logopolis on one of the end title announcements, you hear the announcer say, "for fans of Dr Who there will be a run of old doctor who stories on BBC2 called THE FIVE FACES OF DOCTOR WHO" I got a shiver hearing that again, as that was almost certainly the point where, as a little kid I really signed up for watching the old episodes and getting interested in the series as a whole. I remember trying to get out of a fireworks display in 1981 to go home and watch one of the William Hartnell episodes from that very . Theres also a showing of the regular "Tom Baker is appearing at Madame Tusauds" clip that got shown at the end of some episodes. All well remembered by me.

We see the Swap Shop interviews done with Sarah Sutton (Nyssa) and Peter Davison, he's also shown on Blue Peter and Pebble Mill. Each clip appears to be the full interview, as well as a Nationwide interview with a very coy Tom Baker. In these clips the respective actors talk about the forthcoming events of Baker leaving, Davison taking over etc. All good stuff. I have a glimmer of memories for these, but I am sure I was watching these programmes in eager anticipation of the new series 26 years ago.

The main documentary on the Logopolis DVD is a real treat. Tom Baker is interviewed at length about his time on the show and admits he was a pain to work with, and his colleagues bear this out as they are interviewed back to back. The guy is a genius and has some brilliant one liners in his interview. Peter Davison says "Tom came up to say something to me in a bar after the regeneration scene was shot, I think he was wishing me luck but I couldn't hear him." Cuts to Tom Baker: "I think I was telling him to get the next round in." :)

Other highlights of said documentary, loads of rough cut footage of the regeneration scene, where we see Tom Baker bickering at the directors to hurry up and generally being miserable (fair enough though, he was leaving after all) and we see the layering of the regeneration as it happened (the watcher is shown walking into Tom Bakers body but the watcher is being filmed walking simultaneously with Tom Baker whilst being "overlayed" on his image (it is bizarre because I assumed the watcher was filmed later).

Speaking of the regeneration, due to the various interview clips such as Swap Shop, you get to see this scene replayed numerous times, and even after seeing the making of it, it doesn't lose its poignancy, because despite Bakers cantankerous nature between takes, he delivers the goods in what is essentially his death scene, and you can't argue with results.

As many people will admit, a lot of the special effects are embarrasing but easily ignored against the quality of the acting, with of course the exception of good old Adric, whose acting does get a bit better as things roll on, but its obvious now why he drew the short straw to leave. When it was originally shown though I had no problem with Adric, apart from the fact that I wanted to be him, travelling in that TARDIS. The bad acting I mistook at the time for Adrics naive manner, but, like the bad special effects, its hard to suspend disbelief as well as when you were 7.

I can't yet pass comment on the commentaries but I look forward to hearing them, particularly The Master himself commentating on The Keeper Of Traken, shortly before he sadly passed away in 2004.

All in all, you cannot go wrong with this if you fit the bill I described at the start of this review. Theres even the legendary 1981 Doctor Who annual in PDF format on DVD rom included amongst many other features I haven't even mentioned here. For the money, the word bargain, just doesn't cover it. This is a steal for what you get. Buy it.
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