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100 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Underrated Masterpiece
This is a superb evocation of RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War with exceptionally good acting by all the main characters. It provides a fascinating vignette of a Lancaster squadron at war, recreating the relationships of aircrew in the understated mannerisms and speech authentically redolent of the British services at that time. This must be one of Dirk...
Published on 12 July 2008 by Canada Dry

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Typical Bogarde
For me it was a fairly run of mill Bogarde film. Good plot line and a taut performance from Bogarde although some of the supporting cast could have played a bigger part
Published 9 months ago by Peter Wrapson


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100 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Underrated Masterpiece, 12 July 2008
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Canada Dry (Suffolk, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
This is a superb evocation of RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War with exceptionally good acting by all the main characters. It provides a fascinating vignette of a Lancaster squadron at war, recreating the relationships of aircrew in the understated mannerisms and speech authentically redolent of the British services at that time. This must be one of Dirk Bogarde's finest roles and he is excellent as the slightly uptight but very brave squadron commander Tim Mason determined to complete his 90th 'op'. There is not much in the way of action as such, so traditional war film buffs may be disappointed, but for those interested in the wartime RAF this film is a must. The climax of the film uses genuine film footage of a raid on Germany and the haunting wireless chatter is real. The four genuine Lancaster bombers used in the film were flown by members of 214 Squadron under the supervision of the OC Sqn Ldr Peter Landon and the whole was shot on location at RAF Upwood. The hangar scenes are complete to the requisite and timeless whistling of the 'erks' and the ringing clang of spanners dropped on concrete. The screenplay and music were written by John Woodridge, a distinguished Mosquito pathfinder pilot. Marvellous stuff and highly recommended.
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51 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bomber Command at War, 30 Oct 2008
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This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
Fantastic film. Very realistic as my Father served in Bomber Command from 1939 to the end of the war & latterly in Lancs. He never really recovered from his war time experiences & died young but we as a family were so lucky to get him back at all. Many didn't. This film shows exactly & realistically what life must have been like for him & his friends. He was one of the fortunate ones who kept his "Appointment in London."
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39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Appointment in London DVD, 17 Jun 2009
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D. C. Paintin "David" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
The Appointment in London arrived in good condition and the quality of the film is good considering it was made back in 1951. Ifound the images quite sharp and the sound clear. The story centered around a Squadron Wing Commander nearing his 90th mission very interesting and gripping. It portrayed very well the pressures faced by members of a wartime operational bomber squadron and the personnel emoitions and coflicts they had to endure in the time of war. Realistically bringing out the human side of the coflict and shown some rare footage of an operational squadron and its base.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply the best., 17 Oct 2011
By 
HuddyBolly (Larnaca, Cyprus) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
Simply the best film about RAF Bomber Command ever made.
Filmed in 1952 by Lion Films, prior to Bogarde's matinee idol career with Rank studios, not only Bogarde but the entire cast give thoroughtly convincing performances. (most of them would have actually served in the war in the armed forces).
The film looks right and feels right. Filmed in black and white,the use of documentary clips greatly enhances the realism as do the 1940s hairstyles that were still the fashion in 1952.
I can only agree with the other commentators that this film; so long ignored, is a genuine masterpiece which, for all their 'special effects' and bright shiny colour puts all the later efforts well and truly in the shade.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Appointment in London, 8 April 2012
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This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
Film making has changed since this film was made. As a result the storyline, the clipped accents, the understated risks of the war, the acting and so forth portray a bygone period. Having said that I still thoroughly enjoyed the film, after having seen it all those years ago. That is how it was. It must have been the first film Dirk Bogarde ever made and I remember he made a great impact. Black and white gives it authenticity and the advantage of being able to incorporate actual newsreel footage of the bombing raids. The final raid was riveting to watch and it reminds us of the dangers these men faced and the bravery and courage they gave. The film did not glorify war.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bomb on the Green, Bomb on the..., 2 April 2011
This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
This (along with films such as "The Key", "The Sea Shall Not Have Them" and "San Demetrio, London") has largely slipped away from the Collective Memory of the British film-watching public but, like those other films, is deserving of much more recognition than it has received in recent years. It is usually compared (unfavourably) with "The Dam Busters", but is, I think, a far better film than that well-known and much-seen classic.
Why better? Quite simply because it doesn't deal with a glamorous "Special Operation", but rather with the day-to-day doings of a Run-of-the-Mill Bomber Squadron (if you could call any wartime activity of Bomber Command "Run-of-the-Mill"). To my mind, it conveys as well as anything I've seen the atmosphere of what it must have been like to have lived and served on a Bomber Command squadron - the understated savoir-faire, the iron discipline cloaked in affable cameraderie, the sheer courage required to have served in such a unit (a Bomber Command crew could look forward to doing TWO tours of THIRTY missions each before it could leave the front line for good. The average life-expectancy of a Bomber Command rear-gunner was four missions. Go figure.).
The central character is Wg. Cmdr. Tim Mason, played by Dirk Bogarde. He is, it has to be said, not a very likeable character. At the beginning of the film we see him and his crew disembark from their shot-up Lancaster. The rear-gunner, injured in a night-fighter attack, is carried past on a stretcher; Mason laughs and waves him away as if he is beneath consideration. Maybe this was an example of understated elan, or something; it left me not liking him at all, an impression that was reinforced later in the film when he tore a strip off poor Pilot Officer Greeno (played by the excellent Bryan Forbes) for a minor infraction.
Anyway, we see Mason doing his best to complete his third tour before being forcibly retired (probably because by this time he is p*ssing everyone off with his frayed nerves and short temper). We meet the Obligatory American, a USAAF officer on secondment to the RAF (played well, and not at all bombastically, by William Sylvester, a reliable character actor whose face you'll recognise but whose name would probably otherwise elude you, as it did me until I looked it up) - although Americans did serve in Bomber Command, I suspect he was placed here to boost box-office appeal in America. His role in the film is to be the rival to Mason for the heart of love-interest Dinah Sheridan, playing a Veddy British WREN officer. Mason wins, though frankly, given his character, for once I was rooting for the American. The climax of the film is a raid on Germany, filmed largely from the cockpit of Mason's Lancaster. This is done so well, using authentic footage, accurate props and brilliant camerawork, that it almost makes you feel airsick watching it. During the heat and turbulence of the raid, you hear the Bomber Leader giving last-minute instructions to his crews; then suddenly he is hit, and you hear his last words as he hands over the lead to Mason - "Bomb on the Green, everybody, bomb on the ..." - then silence. A man in the last moments of life spending those moments not saving himself but making sure the job gets done. A remarkable moment, eery, awe-inspiring and the moral and emotional heart of the film.
Some commentators have called this film dated. It isn't at all. It's timeless. Watch it. Go back to a vanished era, and wonder what it must have been like.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I saw this film in Italy when I was young and...., 21 Feb 2010
By 
Massimo Santilli "kinowelt" (La Spezia - Liguria Italy) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
....,I rember is a wonderful evocation of a RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War with high quality by all the main characters and provides us an interesting picture of the daily life of a Lancaster squadron in Wartime, recreating the sensations of flight personnel with all their troubles.
Surely one of the finest roles of Dirk Bogarde and he's excellent as a courageous squadron leader determined to complete his carnet of missions. The lover of traditional war movie may be disappointed, but for those who are interested in the history of the RAF during the war this film is a must. The climax of the film uses actual footage of a raid on Germany and the wireless interference is very real.
The four authentic Lancaster bomber used in the film were flown by members of 214 Squadron, under the supervision of the OC. SQN. Ldr Peter Landon and the whole thing was filmed in a location at RAF Upwood.
The script and music were written by John Woodridge, a pilot of Mosquito Pathfinder.
The set is wonderful and highly recommended
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Appointment in London, 17 Feb 2012
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B. Gladman (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
Delivered on time and as advertised. The film is an excellent example of British war films. Dirk Bogarde who plays the lead is excellent, and as an ex serviceman I can relate with the telling off he gives one of his officers. Well worth buying if you are interested in this genre.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A treasure, 26 Dec 2011
This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
Fantastic movie. For those who like 'Way to the Stars', 'Angels One Five', 'Journey Together' this is a must in your collection. Really a very nice copy of life of the bombercrews whom serve in Bombercommand in WWII.It puts the accents of the dangers of the missions they flew in an exciting story with a whiff of romance.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No histrionics - puts modern war films to shame, 4 Nov 2011
This review is from: Appointment In London [1952] (DVD)
Appointment in London is without doubt the most accurate film ever made about RAF Bomber Command's war. Dirk Bogarde gives a masterly performance as W.Cdr. Tim Mason, a young man commanding a bomber squadron, and they were all very young; who has to regularly send other young men out on what would now be classed as suicide missions and is on the verge of what we now call post traumatic stress disorder. In 1943 there was no such thing as going on a bit of sick leave and Mason has to just 'press on'. As other reviewers have said, Tim Mason does not come across as a very likeable character, but being based on Guy Gibson he couldn't be otherwise. The film also shows the multi-national make up of Bomber Command, bomber squadrons and individual crews. Appointment in London is a fitting portrayal of the air war, in which between 1939 and 1945, over 55,000 men of Bomber Command gave their lives.
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Appointment In London [1952]
Appointment In London [1952] by Philip Leacock (DVD - 2010)
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