Customer Reviews


22 Reviews
5 star:
 (11)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic British cinema
Optimum Films has given us the great gift of a beautiful, widescreen transfer of this outstanding film. The photography is stunning, the acting first-rate, and the story compelling. Peter Katin's soulful rendition of Brahm's Piano Concerto in D Minor accompanies, and complements, the touching story throughout.

Leslie Caron is perfect as 27-year-old Jane, a...
Published on 30 April 2008 by M. FUSCO

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Retro DVD
Not the best 'old' film in my collection, a bit boring most of the time but still worth watching if you like Sixties capers.

Very poor quality DVD recording, kept freezing and had to skip several parts, plays like a cheap copy that you would find in a dodgy market.
Published 12 months ago by R F Bull


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic British cinema, 30 April 2008
By 
M. FUSCO "yawnmower" (NEW YORK, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
Optimum Films has given us the great gift of a beautiful, widescreen transfer of this outstanding film. The photography is stunning, the acting first-rate, and the story compelling. Peter Katin's soulful rendition of Brahm's Piano Concerto in D Minor accompanies, and complements, the touching story throughout.

Leslie Caron is perfect as 27-year-old Jane, a young French woman who finds lodgings in a seedy London rooming house. Next door to her L-shaped attic room is Johnny, a West Indian jazz musician. Downstairs is Toby (Tom Bell in his most memorable role), an aspiring writer. Avis Bunnage is the feisty Cockney landlady and Cicely Courtneidge is an over-the-hill music hall performer. A veritable treasure-trove of delightful English character actors populate their dysfunctional familial world.

The story centers around the shaky romance of Jane and Toby. She is remarkably independent for a woman of that era (1962 was just the dawning of women's rights). Tom Bell is achingly handsome, and utterly winning in his low-key, self-effacing, but determined pursuit of his neighbor. He wins her over, but then takes off when informed that Jane is pregnant by another man. If there is a false note in the film, it is Johnny's curious `morality' (especially for a jazz musician), and his spitefulness in telling Toby of the baby. But he too is in love with Toby.

We want so much for the beautiful couple to be together, the non-committal ending comes as something of a relief. At least we can hope for their future happiness.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous piece of 60s drama!, 14 April 2010
By 
FAMOUS NAME (UNITED KINGDOM) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
Moving and quite touching story of relationships, lovers and strangers from various backgrounds getting to know each other in a set of dingy rooms.

'Jane' (Lesley Caron) moves into rooms let within a large house. When she arrives, no-one knows she is pregnant. (bearing in mind this is 1962) She rents a room at the top of a house with various other occupants. At first, it appears that everyone keeps themselves to themselves, and that it is unlikely that she'll ever have anything to do with any of them.

Whilst there, she begins a relationship with a handsome 'Tom Bell', whose character lives just below her. Eventually, she gets to know the rest of the Tenants who are not so bad after all.

This movie makes subtle hints at male homosexuality, lesbianism, prostitution and racism. It is also a great example at showing how everyone has their good side - and how tolerant people can be. There's a particularly touching scene when Jane's black neighbour whimpers in the night through their partition asking for forgiveness after confessing he's told lies about her out of spite and jealousy concerning her relationship with the young man below.

A real 'mixed bag' of actors in this - including; Pat Phoenix (formerly Elsie Tanner of Coronation Street), Dame Cicely Courtneidge, Mark Eden, Nannette Newman, Bernard Lee and Tony Booth.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully made, 25 Aug 2012
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
This is one of my favourite books so was thrilled that there was a film available. The film doesn't stray much from the book, and has added a three dimensional life to the characters in the book, without taking away what I saw in my minds eye. The film is in black and white, which suits the tone of the book. Loved it. And still love the book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Big Drama in a Small Room, 3 Nov 2011
By 
C. Gwilliam (Saone et Loire, France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
Bryan Forbes's "The L-Shaped Room" never seems to be recalled as readily or praised as lavishly as other films from the new wave of British 'kitchen-sink' dramas like "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning" or "A Taste of Honey" but it it quite their equal. The director makes sparing but effective use of locations in a lost London of Rachmanland bed-sits and corner caffs, but most of film takes place in the eponymous claustrophobic room in sleazy boarding house-cum-knocking-shop run by a splendidly repellent Avis Bunnage.
Leslie Caron takes refuge there as she considers her options. Pregnant, unmarried and out of work, she mis-trusts, but is gradually befriended by, the other occupants of the house: Tom Bell went on to a career playing coppers and heavies, but here he is a charming romantic lead as a struggling writer. Brock Peters is, it must be said, somewhat over the top as a jazz trumpeter, and Cicely Courtneidge (mis-spelt on the liner as Courinedge) steals the entire film as a resting thespian. In her very late '70's when the film was made, she had had a long career on the halls and in film with husband Jack Hulbert, but this is surely her career-best performance. The scene where she shows Caron a photo of her dead long-time companion will break your heart. Pat Phoenix of Coronation Street fame contributes a fine cameo as an ageing tart with a heart of gold. Caren herself is tender, vulnerable yet tough, a fine performance in a perfect role for her.
Presented in monochrome in correct 16:9 ratio, this DVD while enthral you for the whole of its two-hour running time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'L' is for 'LOVE IT', 10 Mar 2010
By 
S. J. Cross (Lancashire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
This film is 'based upon' the book of the same name. It is not an audio visual rendition of the literary work, and as such not to be taken as a reproduction of the book, it stands in its own right as a marvellous film with an ending which never fails to bring me to tears (when returning to the flat she leaves the manuscript on the typewriter, the message she writes upon it is ...oh, I'd best stop my eyes are beginning to swell).

Even though this film is close on 50 years old the technical merits and artistry of the photography and acting far exceed that of most films produced in the last 50 years. The film notes many social changes and many remaining consistencies, from smoking in bars, petting in the park, graffiti covered walls, inequality and other socially inclined statements.

Comments have been made about the sound quality, however you need not worry the sound is great. Yes there are a few crackles n' pops with the music accompanying the titles but that adds to it, giving it a belonging to the time at which it was filmed.

This is a film in which you can become immersed, a film of great beauty. Don't be put off by those who seem not to appreciate the skill of Dickie A & co. Venture outside the box and you won't look back.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cicely Courtneidge plays her most dramatic role, 9 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
A good view reminding me how much I enjoyed the original film on the cinema screen. The memory of Cicely Courtneidge playing the ageing lesbian theatrical has remained with me since watching the film in the 1960s; a sterling character performance by an actress who I had the pleasure of seeing on the stage a couple of times with her husband, Jack Hulbert.

As for the film, itself, it is quite a period piece, now, but retains its grit which in the 1960s was ahead of its time. The black and white photography lends more atmosphere to the story and its quite an ensemble piece with all the cast turning in moving performances.

If you are a fan of the vintage cinema then this is for you!

Cheers, Tim
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great movies. Wretched DVD., 9 Aug 2003
By 
Gary W. McClintock (Clive, IA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Darling is one of the great movies of the British New Wave. When John Schlesinger died a couple weeks ago, the U.S. press here dismissed the film as having become dated. But I've always thought Schlesinger's early English films have kept their appeal much more than his later American films. And maybe some of that appeal for me is that the early films do depict their period so convincingly. Certainly the orgiastic confession party in Darling provides a definition of dissipation I associate with the swinging life of that period (in tandem with the similar scene from La Dolce Vita). But the basic story of a beautiful young woman doomed by her own shallowness seems to be a story that still gets told in films. To some degree anyway. It doesn't seem to be a story locked into the 1960s. End of Review. Note on the DVD: The prints presented here are very dirty. Lots of black spots. Buckets of white spots. The L-Shaped Room is stated as being presented in 1:1.66 aspect ratio when in fact it is 1:1.33 and suffers accordingly. I get a sinking feeling that Darling will remain remembered as an also ran if a better DVD doesn't come along.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars On the eve of the Youth Rebellion, 16 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
This story was written and filmed just on the eve of the Youth Rebellion of the Sixties, and it gives a moving and realistic description of the situation of a young woman, who finds herself pregnant and unmarried. Thrown out by her father, she must find lodgings and a job, and being a resourceful young woman, she manages her life with dignity and honesty. She finds a lover, too, though he finds it difficult to cope with the pregnancy. Can be compared with the film An Education, but being actually of the times it describes, it has more authenticity. Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars great little gem of a film, 4 Sep 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
Good film, love the old footage of London,esp Ladbroke grove, love the dynamics of the relationships between the lodgers, bit slow but overall a great film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Solid performance by Leslie Caron highlights a fine film, 7 Jan 2011
By 
The CinemaScope Cat - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] (DVD)
In the early 1960s, England produced a string of marvelous B&W gritty and naturalistic "kitchen sink" dramas which were a refreshing contrast to the glossy Technicolor confections still coming out of Hollywood. Films that were more interested in character than plot, insight rather than entertainment. Directors like Tony Richardson, Lindsay Anderson, Karel Reisz, John Schlesinger, Jack Clayton and Bryan Forbes who directed this treasure. Alone in London, a pregnant French girl (Leslie Caron) moves into a shoddy flat and haltingly emerges from her self induced cocoon to interact with the other members of the boarding house. Forbes doesn't push but lets us discover for ourselves the need for human contact we all need and how the lack of it can slowly destroy the soul. Caron gives the performance of her career (and a justified Oscar nomination) but the film is filled with wonderful characters inhabited by Tom Bell, Brock Peters, Cicely Courtneidge, Bernard Lee, Avis Bunnage and Nanette Newman. I could have done without the tasteful Brahms mayonnaise on the soundtrack but John Barry composed some nice jazz.

The Optimum DVD is a handsomely rendered 1.78 B&W transfer. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962]
The L-Shaped Room [DVD] [1962] by Bryan Forbes (DVD - 2007)
9.46
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews