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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Viewing
Winston Churchill said that this was one of his favourite films and that, I can well imagine. It epitomises one man crying out for the urgent need to prepare for war - as indeed Churchill did in the lead up to the Second World War - instead of appeasement.

Laurence Olivier and his then wife, Vivien Leigh make the perfect Lord Horatio Nelson and Lady Emma...
Published on 29 May 2010 by Mr. R. D. M. Kirby

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3.0 out of 5 stars Gift
The great Vivien Leigh, Mum couldn't remember if she had seen this film so added to her Christmas list. Enjoyed and the DVD was of reasonable quality with subtitles.
Published 13 months ago by Mrs W


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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Viewing, 29 May 2010
By 
Mr. R. D. M. Kirby "Dick Kirby" (Suffolk, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941] (DVD)
Winston Churchill said that this was one of his favourite films and that, I can well imagine. It epitomises one man crying out for the urgent need to prepare for war - as indeed Churchill did in the lead up to the Second World War - instead of appeasement.

Laurence Olivier and his then wife, Vivien Leigh make the perfect Lord Horatio Nelson and Lady Emma Hamilton. Vivien Leigh's Cockney accent as Emma Hart at the commencement of the film, is a treat and Laurence Olivier's almost inarticulate outbursts against the Admiralty, the King of Naples and anybody else who cannot adopt his principals are masterly; he depicts Nelson as a doer and a fighter, rather than a talker or a diplomat. Gladys Cooper takes a terrific part as Lady Nelson and Alan Mowbray, as Sir William Hamilton manages to pinch some of the best acerbic lines and delivers them with unerring malice aforethought.

With sweeping music by Miklos Rozsa, and the excitingly staged Battle of Trafalgar, the film is unashamedly patriotic and for a serial blubber like myself, it demands a double pack of Kleenex.

Unmissable.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PURE HOLLYWOOD MOONSHINE, 12 Oct 2003
By 
Henning Sebastian Jahre "Judy-Viv" (Oslo, Norway) - See all my reviews
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... though the producer and director was Alexander Korda(From Hungary, lived in England) on a mission(sent by Churchill)to make a propaganda film in order to get the Americans involved with what happened here in Europe. Indeed, his actions were questioned and he was ordered to explain himself before the goverment... A few days later things happened at Pearl Harbor and the case was dropped...
Vivien Leigh and Emma Hamilton had striking similaraties. Both were thought to be the most beautiful of the period and both made their men become knighted by Britain. They both har brains and the most important thing in their lives were Nelson and Olivier. Emma died at 50, Vivien at 53... When Emma died; Nelson`s crew sailed in her honour(not seen in the film - they never fotgot their leader`s Emma) and when Vivien passed away; the theatres of London turned down their lights in her honour...
They were both strong-willed women... In fact; I think Vivien recognised this and played Emma on a variation of herself. Hugo Vicker`s brilliant 1986-book on Vivien reveal her chararcter quite good and it`s then easy 2 c Vivien playing herself in the film.
Korda said to her; "Vivien - Emma was VULGAR" - to which Vivien snapped back; "You wouldn`t have given me a contract if I`ve been vulgar,"
This is a good film thanks 2 Vivien, Olivier, Sara Allgood(and the rest of the supporting cast), the scenic design(by Alexander`s brother Zoltan Korda)and the brilliant lines spoken by the best Shakespearian actors in the Hollywood community.
Churchill loved it and presented Vivien with a self-made painting, It hung in her bedroom till she died...
This is an all-time must-c film.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A TALE OF STAR CROSSED LOVERS..., 1 Oct 2001
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
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This film is based upon the real life love affair between Lord Admiral Horatio Nelson and Lady Emma Hamilton, wife of the British Ambassador to Naples. Real life husband and wife team, Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh, as the star crossed lovers, give magnificent performances. Ms. Leigh is absolutely enchanting in the role of Lady Hamilton. Mr. Olivier is likewise effective in his role, though Ms. Leigh is definitely the star of this show. The supporting cast also gives superb performances, particularly Henry Wilcoxon in the role of the cuckolded husband, Lord William Hamilton.
The story tells the viewer of the rise of Emma Hart, a blacksmith's daughter with a scarlet past, who by dint of her beauty and determination rose out of poverty and obscurity to become the wife of Lord William Hamilton, the British Ambassador to Naples. After their marriage, she is known as Lady Hamilton and becomes the toast of Naples. She then meets Admiral Horatio Nelson and her life changes, yet again. Defying social conventions, she and the also married Nelson begin a love affair that was to become public knowledge and lead to great scandal. What happened to them is memorably dramatized.
This is a wonderful film that all who love period pieces and historical dramas will enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stellar performances, 16 Nov 2013
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This review is from: That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941] (DVD)
This film could easily be criticised for being dated, and, indeed, it was filmed entirely on a set that looks much more like Holywood than Naples. It is clunky, in many ways, but...the performances by Oliver and Leigh are breathtaking, and the writing very lively and sparky. You really get the sense that you watching Nelson and Emma Hamilton as they might have been, and the underlying sexual chemistry and tension are palpable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars POLITICS, 1 Mar 2013
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This review is from: That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941] (DVD)
Interesting film and Vivien was very photogenic what was really interesting was the political context in which the film was made. In a way made it far more interesting viewing. Film good quality reproduction and whiles away a rainy afternoon.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars That Brilliant Movie, 28 April 2008
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This review is from: That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941] (DVD)
In 1941 Alexander Korda directed one of the best films of the 1940s and even of all time.Staring Laurence Olivier(Henry V) as Lord Nelson and Vivien Leigh (Gone with the Wind)as Emma Hamilton.Made in World War 2 can be clearly seen as a bit of a proganda film of the time.This film took 6 weeks to film and every scene looks fresh you wouldnt get a movie done that quick these days.From there first meeting in Italy to the scene where Lady Hamilton is informed of Lord Nelsons death at the Battle of Trafalgar the movie is classic story telling the likes of what seem to be extintc some times.This was Winston Churchills favorite movie probabaly due to it being very proud of being british and the hidden messages about defending you country and freedom.A true classic of a movie shame it hasnt got a proper DVD realease but seems that the Granada dvd is the best one to get.Well what you waiting for go see it.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Greats!, 2 Jan 2010
By 
F. S. L'hoir (Irvine, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941] (DVD)
My mother took me to see "That Hamilton Woman" when I was a small child in a Hollywood movie theatre, and I have never forgotten either the film, or Vivien Leigh's poignant last line. I am therefore happy to discover that far from being a remnant of my child's imagination, the charm of the film remains in tact. In Black and White, "That Hamilton Woman" exudes virtual "colour" because of its splendid story, which combines romance and history; its magnificent cinematography; and the polished performances of its protagonists (Arguably, only Leigh and Olivier had the stature to play lovers whose affair had assumed the notoriety of that of Antony and Cleopatra.).

Vivien Leigh portrays Emma, Lady Hamilton, with coquettish grace, and Lawrence Olivier endows Horatio Nelson with proper "heart of oak". Both of them suggest a selfishness of the "all-for-love-and-the-world-well-lost" variety. Alan Mobray, who plays Sir William Hamilton, conveys a quiet dignity as he acknowledges the inevitability of the scandalous behavior of his wife, who was some thirty-four years his junior. Hamilton, British Ambassador to the court of Naples at the turn of the 18th century, was a noted antiquarian who, along with the King and Queen of Naples, 'collected' artifacts from the newly discovered Pompeii and Herculaneum. He has married Emma for the sake of charity, and prompted by her own guilt, she accuses of him of collecting her along with his coveted statues and art objects. The only character I did not care for was Lady Nelson, who was relentlessly glacial. One gets the feeling that Alexander Korda directed her to be as unsympathetic as possible, in order to weight the audience's sympathies in favor of the lovers, since the morality of the affair was considered unsuitable in the cinema of the 'forties.

The Battle of Trafalgar is breathtaking. HMS Victory was constructed to scale, but, according to the commentary, the ships-of-the-line in the background were the size of dinghies, manipulated like puppets by prop men inside of them. The battle took place in a tank with wind machines that roil the water convincingly. One would never guess that this scene as well as the elegant sets, which feature Vesuvius smoldering in the background, were jerrybuilt on a low budget. One can only admire the excellence of the finished product in an era decades before CGI effects.

According to Michael Korda's fascinating interview, Churchill encouraged Alexander Korda to make the film for propaganda purposes in order to get the United States to join the war--a problem that was settled by December, 1941; and while the anti-Napoleon/tyrant message may seem quaint to today's audience, it certainly did not when I first saw the film. To us Americans, Nelson epitomised British courage in the face of the onslaught of the twentieth-century tyrant, whom I am not going to dignify with a name, and what can, without hyperbole, be termed his forces of evil. Although the same message was conveyed with slightly more subtlety in "Casablanca" of the previous year, considering the historical context, it is not out of place in "That Hamilton Woman," the performances of which transcend the film's political message, which, at that point in history, was crucial.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Larry and Viv, 28 Feb 2014
By 
Mr. J. A. Heath (Wallington, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941] (DVD)
I remember seeing this film when I was a child in the 1950's but I was not really aware who Olivier and Leigh were at the time. Some years later I saw Olivier in his film production of Richard 111 and became am instant fan of his I found his performance so amazing I wanted to found out more about him as an actor and Shakespeare's plays. I brought a book from Foyles the bookshop in London called the Olivier's and I found out Vivien Leigh the famous actress from Gone with the Wind was his wife. I like That Hamilton woman or some just call it Lady Hamilton Olivier as Nelson is very commanding with his beautiful speaking voice and presence and Vivien Leigh so beautiful and perfect opposite Olivier as Nelson. The fact that the Olivier's had this love affair at the time I think makes the film story of Nelson and Lady Hamilton seem more real. Olivier's good look and Vivien's beauty shines through. But in a way their love affair was just as tragic in the end as Nelson's and Lady Hamilton's very sad really.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Gift, 4 Jun 2013
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This review is from: That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941] (DVD)
The great Vivien Leigh, Mum couldn't remember if she had seen this film so added to her Christmas list. Enjoyed and the DVD was of reasonable quality with subtitles.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars That Brilliant Movie, 28 April 2008
By 
In 1941 Alexander Korda directed one of the best films of the 1940s and even of all time.Staring Laurence Olivier(Henry V) as Lord Nelson and Vivien Leigh (Gone with the Wind)as Emma Hamilton.Made in World War 2 can be clearly seen as a bit of a proganda film of the time.This film took 6 weeks to film and every scene looks fresh you wouldnt get a movie done that quick these days.From there first meeting in Italy to the scene where Lady Hamilton is informed of Lord Nelsons death at the Battle of Trafalgar the movie is classic story telling the likes of what seem to be extintc some times.This was Winston Churchills favorite movie probabaly due to it being very proud of being british and the hidden messages about defending you country and freedom.A true classic of a movie shame it hasnt got a proper DVD realease but seems that the Granada dvd is the best one to get.Well what you waiting for go see it.
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That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941]
That Hamilton Woman [DVD] [1941] by Alexander Korda (DVD - 2010)
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