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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good if over hyped OS
I decided to go for a complete Vista disk as opposed to an upgrade. When I first changed over to XP, I used an upgrade disk from Windows 98. Poor speed and errors were commonplace until I installed a full XP disk.
Determined not to make the same mistake, I used a full Vista disk.
Unlike XP you only have one format option and that is the complete format of your...
Published on 14 Feb. 2007 by D. I. Shipley

versus
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Bloated, awkward and slow...
After using Vista for several months, I've found it to be slow (if Apple, Sun and Linux developers can make their newer operating systems more efficient than their last, why can't Microsoft?), awkward (few things work in an intuitive manner, leading to exasperation) and apparently bloated with additional processes which seem ineffective (Apple's...
Published on 23 Jun. 2007 by Tony S, Milton Keynes, UK


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Bloated, awkward and slow..., 23 Jun. 2007
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
After using Vista for several months, I've found it to be slow (if Apple, Sun and Linux developers can make their newer operating systems more efficient than their last, why can't Microsoft?), awkward (few things work in an intuitive manner, leading to exasperation) and apparently bloated with additional processes which seem ineffective (Apple's Quartz/Aqua/Dashboard/Expose interface is so much faster and pleasant, as well as being genuinely useful) and slow to use.

XP's security problems were scandelous - but at least it didn't need a 2GHz multicore machine to run MS Word in a reasonable manner.

Hopefully Vista SP1 will streamline the interface, processes and kernal.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars My second report on Vista - not good, 26 Nov. 2007
By 
Dave (Liverpool) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
If you have read my previous review of Vista Home Premium Upgrade on 17 June (i can't write a second review for the upgrade so i'm writing it here) you will know how much of a nightmare installation was for me. In short, after installation (which took 4 hours!) and logging in for the first time i foolishly set a login password - BIG MISTAKE, as the pc wouldn't accept my correct password the second time i logged in (first time the password worked). Eventually managed to restore the system which meant backing up all my files (no setting a password this time!). After spending hours installing drivers to get everything working (well, my integrated webcam stutters now thanks to the new OS) i was ready to get to grips with Vista Home Premium.

Here's a list of the pros and cons i've found:

Pros:
Improved layout.
Instant Search function allows me to find files easier if i don't know their location.
Visual effects very easy on the eye and incredibly customisable.

Cons:
Drains system performance - with 1gb RAM, the OS uses at least 50% RAM after start-up period with no apps running and when i have multiple apps running (eg. anti-virus scan, few Internet Exp tabs, couple Word docs) RAM usage soars to the point where the pc is almost unusable.
Aero interface is annoying because minimising a window is gradual and slow - i prefer it to be instant because the whole point of minimising a window is to get it out of the way!!!
Both myself and a friend complain of Win Media Player not recognsing mp3 players and on mine cds that have been ripped are IMPOSSIBLE to add to the music library.
Recently i have experienced applications not responding for at least 20 minutes meaning i have to take out the power cord and battery to shut down. This was the last straw and i am awaiting recovery disks from HP to take the pc back to the factory installed and perfectly capable Win XP Media Center Edition 2005 (it's CENTRE!). One thing worth noting: i did spend three hours creating recovery disks using HP software when the laptop was new, but the computer said they "do not work with this pc model"... surprise surprise.

In my opinion going back to XP Media CENTRE Edition 2005 will offer much more than Vista: much improved performance (in particular multi-tasking), brilliant compatibility with periphirals and software, improved laptop battery life and a more stable experience. I ignored bad reviews of Vista and went ahead with the installation to review it for myself and so will most prospective upgraders. My upgrade was free of charge "thanks" to HP and i'm not pleased due to the sheer inconvenience of using the OS. Paying for it though, that's an insult.

Hope it helps
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars remember - microsoft vista knows best - you are a clueless fool, 22 May 2007
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
I've just got a new pc with vista home premium pre-installed on it. Despite being a dual core 1.73 processor (vs. my old laptop which was a pentium 4 from two and a half years ago, it is slower than my old laptop running xp pro was. Not a great start.

Then there are the software incompatibility issues - despite running upgrade advisor before trying to migrate my system across to Vista, loads of software has issues which upgrade advisor didn't identify. Easy File Transfer was a nightmare - constantly crashing Outlook when I tried to transfer my settings.

Most annoying of all is the "Vista knows what's good for you and what you want to do" approach of this operating system. Yes, you can disable the incredibly annoying double or triple confirmations of "are you sure you want to do this?" [respond yes] "really sure?" [respond yes] "really, really sure?" [respond yes, or smash up computer] by deactivating User Account Control. However, Vista decides, sometimes arbitrarily, that you don't have permission to access certain folders or even whole removable hard drives (despite being the systems administrator). Call me old fashioned, but I find it more than slightly niggling to be the sole user of a computer and being denied the right to access, for example, a whole hard drive containing my music by the computer. It's clearly a system that's been designed to ensure that n00bs don't go around deleting system files and crashing their machines fatally, but if you've got an iota of common sense and roughly know your way around an xp workspace, you'll find vista drives you mad with its sluggish interface and constant warning messages and confirmations, and upgrade issues. Essentially I don't think its ready for the market yet - avoid until you really have to if you're running xp at the mo.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good if over hyped OS, 14 Feb. 2007
By 
D. I. Shipley "David Shipley" (KENT United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
I decided to go for a complete Vista disk as opposed to an upgrade. When I first changed over to XP, I used an upgrade disk from Windows 98. Poor speed and errors were commonplace until I installed a full XP disk.
Determined not to make the same mistake, I used a full Vista disk.
Unlike XP you only have one format option and that is the complete format of your hard drive. Nonetheless, I was very impressed by the installation speed, had Vista up and running in just under 25 mins.

I had to download drivers for my graphic card, printer, and scanner but there were no issues there. My sound, however, was another story. Not having used a sound card, I had relied on the motherboard Soundmax controller. No drivers available for that, after days of hunting, so I went out and bought an Audigy sound card, downloaded its driver and now have better sound than I ever did when running sound off the Motherboard....
So ironically sorting out a Vista problem actually improved my setup.
I find Vista clearer and easier to use than XP. They have overdone the safety menus when it comes to wanting to delete or move files though. Three "are you sures?" are two too many!
The Desktop is an improvement on XP and I particularly like the Sidebar with its gadgets such as the clock, weather, news items, and date etc.
Aero is pretty and the 3D function for checking open windows is useful. That said it is over hyped from the be all end all that the advertising has been making it out to be.

Strongly recommend that anyone wanting to go to Vista runs the MS Upgrade Adviser compatability programme which will identify any system needs or possible software problems such as non compatability. I found it a useful pre installation tool and was able to prepare accordingly. You will need to go to the MS website to download this tool.
Be warned that virtually all Spyware and Virus programmes have yet to be made Vista ready. Some like Xoftspyse and NoAdware V.4 (as of the 21.2.7, NoAdware V.4 seems to be running normally on Vista) will run but will give erroneous information after scanning.

I think you have two considerations re Vista:
Firstly is it too soon to go over and safer to wait for the Service Packs to make it more compatable?
Secondly there is much rumbling on Web forums that Microsoft appear to be downgrading the degree of support that used to be given to XP and instead are putting this Vista's way.
I think that the latter probably slightly outweighs the first and therefore it is probably wise to make the jump. Just make sure that you have made your preparations first. Download and run that compatability tool, and see what is needed from there. Sound does seem to be the problem that rears up for most people, myself included. Otherwise now that the OS is up and running on my PC, I am getting used to it and starting to enjoy using it.

One last thing, be sure to shop around for the best deal on Vista. Price differences are startling, sometimes by over 100%....
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hasta La Vista ... XP ?, 4 Mar. 2007
By 
Alexander Aris "Alex" (Oxford, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
I have eagerly anticipated buying this *new* Operating System from Microsoft for many, many months. I bought, tested and used the Release Candidate 1 version in Autumn 2006. I knew what to expect, but wouldn't know for sure until I actually bought and played around with Windows Vista ...

And so it began ... On Saturday 3rd March at 9:49 am I started to do a *clean* install of Home Premium 32-Bit (Full Retail), after a five minute pause, it happily whirled away, reset a few times and finally finished at exactly 10:30am. All I had to do then, was install drivers for my Canon Pixma MP130 Printer, Logitech QuickCam and Creative Audigy Soundcard. The Internet connection was practically up and running as Vista started. This all sounds too simple doesn't it ?

The spec on my PC : Foxxconn Motherboard with AMD Athlon 64 Processor 3200+ 2.00ghz, 1.5gig RAM, 128MB PCI-Express ATI Sapphire Graphics Card, LG DVD-ROM Drive, 80gig Hard-Drive, Creative PCI Audigy Soundcard, Logitech QuickCam Connect Webcam and Canon Pixma MP130 Printer (Printing only tested).

Software Tested and Working So Far : AVG Free, Photo Filtre, Outrun 2006 - Coast to Coast, Taito Legends, iTunes (purchased from Store ok), MS Works 8, MS MOney 2005, Lavasoft Ad-Aware, Vice Versa Pro, Game Maker 7.0 and Adobe Reader 8.0

I do like Vista a lot and love all the *new* features that have been incorporated into it. My particular favourites are : Media Centre, Calendar, all the Gadgets, the Indexed Search System and Photo Gallery. The switch between feature is quite nice, but rather gimicky. The Aero interface, specifically the glass effect, is quite pleasing on the eye. The desktop now feels bigger, brighter and more vibrant.

I have read many reports of people having problems installing Vista, both full and upgrade versions. I fully sypathise, as this can prove very frustrating. I spent a few weeks before I actually purchased Vista, researching what was going to work and not. The Vista Upgrade Advisor did help somewhat, but I went a step further and checked which hardware and software was going to work. This will help avoid any potential problems you may encounter when trying to install Vista.

There are many versions of Vista to choose from, only you can decide which version is right for you, despite the fact there are a few too many. If you want the *new* look without anything the extra, like the Aero Interface and Media Centre, then go for the Basic Edition. Go for Home Premium to get Aero and Media Centre, then for the all Bells and Whistles, go for Ultimate. If you go for the Upgrade Version, then be prepared for potential headaches, although you may not have any problems at all. My best advice, is to buy the FULL version ! Each PC may perform differently from another, I have always found that with any version of Windows, an upgrade always slows things up a bit. But a fresh install is possible, I always did this with Windows XP.

*** NOTE : Before you start any installation of Vista, backup all of your important Documents and Files ***

Summary :::

There is varible pricing of Vista, both for the upgrade and full version. OEM Versions may seem cheaper, but tend to have limitations on how they are installed on a PC, like only once on a specific PC. These are purely aimed at PC manufacturers and PC Builders. The retail versions, bought from shops and different outlets allow for more flexibility for the user. If your Motherboard or some other Component dies, you should be able to re-install Windows without any problems. The price of Vista and Office 2007 is coming down, the prices through Amazon are proof of that.

Windows Vista is great ! I love it ! It's fresher ! I have been using Microsoft Windows products since 1996, where I began with Windows 95 and went straight through to Windows XP. Hardware and Software has changed quite a lot and so has Windows. I think the jump from XP to Vista has been quite big, so to some users, it has been quite a shock, specifically to the power of the PC you require in order for it to run satisfactory. Within a few months, many hardware and software vendors will have caught up with the public release of Vista. Most of the current issues will be resolved. This scenario is a expected with every version of a Windows release.

If your PC is capable of having Windows Vista installed and you want to experience all that it has to offer, then go for it ! However, if you are happy with the version of Windows you currently have, then stay as you are ! The choice is wonderfully simple !
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Common misconceptions, 31 May 2008
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
I've had Vista running for about 6 months now. I've got a quad-core with 2Gb RAM, 500Gb HD and a Geforce9600, and I can honestly say that I've had very few problems with the OS as a whole.

Firstly, let's look at the new GUI. With any Windows release, the GUI is usually the first thing that anyone talks about. Whether this is a good thing or not is a seperate argument, but Vista comes out absolute trumps for me. The indexed searching from the start menu means I only ever actually look at my programs list once every few weeks. Everything else I want to run is just typed straight into the friendly box on the start menu to bring up exactly what I want. The GUI has had a few other tweaks. Aero looks fancy, with the most useful feature probably being the thumbnail previews of any programs that you hover over in the taskbar. On top of this there's a funky new Alt+tab style thing which you access with the Windows key+tab. You can scroll through the window previews with the mouse wheel, or the tab key, or just click on what you want. There are obviously things that people are not going to like, the Control Panel has undergone several significant changes, networking being the most obviously noticeable, but once you get used to the system, as with most things, it's not as bad as it looks, in some cases being more intuitive.

So coming nicely onto security, and the woes of the UAC. That thing that pops up lots of annoying dialogs asking you if you want to continue. It's not really that bad. If you want to do something to a protected directory, make sure you right click and use the administrator option. If you're doing something potentially dangerous, yes, it lets you know. It could still do with some work, but by-the-by it works. It's something that increases security in Windows, and that's always a good thing. In general, the firewall has been majorly improved as has Windows Defender (anti-spyware), and recently in tests, Vista, Leopard and Linux (not sure which variety) all survived to the same standards on their own, only falling prey once third party stuff was introduced (that means, using something that's not part of the OS to hack into it). There are still dangers to using Internet Explorer (dangers such as ActiveX), but this is not something to worry too deeply about, as it has less security holes than Safari (Apple's offering, this is well documented), but if you wanted to try something else, I'd suggest looking at Opera.

So I thought I'd have to say something about memory management, because everyone else has something to say about it. Vista will always appear to use high memory. This does not mean it is actually using that memory. Let me explain - when the computer is idle, and not using memory, you've got all that memory that's just going to waste. So what Vista does is it uses that memory to preload anything it thinks you will use. If something else needs that memory it can be freed very quickly, but if something that it expects to be run is run, everything is already loaded, leading to faster application startup times. Since Vista is using all this memory, you will constantly see upwards of 50% of RAM constantly in use. This is not a bad thing, it is a good feature, and something that actually helps your computer.

If you work from home at all, Remote Desktop has been vastly improved. It's the same interface, except for the password box, but it seems a lot snappier and responsive, and it's completely backwards compatible with XP.

I feel that I have to mention DirectX 10, just before I get to bugs. DirectX 10 is meant to be a huge change for 3D graphics for gaming, however it does not seem to have lived up to the hype. I can't really tell the difference, except in FPS (frames per second), although I'm going to have a look at the actual code behind it soon.

So, the bugs with Vista. There's three main problems with Vista - firstly, network file copying is stupidly slow for some people. As in, go make yourself a meal, take it to your mate's house and watch the football with a few beers, then head back and it might be done. This has been fixed slightly with Service Pack 1, although personally, I have not really experienced it badly, transferring files from an XP PC to a Vista PC. Secondly, zipping and unzipping are slower than they should be. I have every confidence that this will be fixed, but you can use tools like WinZip or WinRAR to unzip and zip files until it is. The third and worst problem for me are the Nvidia drivers, which have been bad for ages. In general, the most crashes are caused by third party software (that is, software that Microsoft is not responsible for), and while this seems like passing the buck, these companies have had more than enough time to get the work done, and there's no excuse for it, even if there was, it's nothing whatsoever to do with Microsoft.

All in all I've been very pleased with Vista, even though it was a bit of a trial at first getting used to it. As far as whether you should get Vista or not, if you have an old PC (more than a year old), don't get it. If you're getting a brand new PC, might as well buy it from somebody without big corporate connections and install Vista yourself on it. Just make sure you get a well-specced machine (and that goes for graphics card as well), and things should be fine.
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40 of 46 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Please Read before You Buy, 1 Feb. 2007
By 
Tellboy (Manchester) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
Please run the Microsoft Software Upgrade Advisor before parting with any money.

[...]

On my 3GHz, 2048 RAM 512MB Graphics and 500GB Disk PC the hardware was declared OK with the exception of my Epson Perfection 2480 Scanner , HP Colour Printer 7150.

The Software issues were numerous predicting problems with Nero 7, Ghost 10, Acronis True Image Backup, Dragon Naturally Speaking 9, Alcohol 120% ,

Tune Up Utilities 2007, Partition Magic 10, Snagit v6 and Smartboard XP.

All of these are used constantly and I expect they will be upgraded to Vista for a price. Add that to the cost.

For the moment I will wait a while.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice, but obsolete if above 3GB, 31 Jan. 2008
By 
Mr. Steven C. Bakker "Serioli" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
The operating system is nice. It has enough similarities to continue from XP but enough new things to be either interesting or frustrating depending on your outlook. Easier to get started with for new users (in the opinion of my mother (54), my nephew (7) and niece (4))

PLEASE NOTE - If you are interested in upgrading to more than 3GB of RAM any time in the future ENSURE you get the 64 bit version and that your computer is 64 bit capable. 32 bit OS WILL NOT acknowledge much more than 3.5GB of RAM

I have currently fallen foul of this and am arguing with Microsoft about why I should buy a new full OS (64-bit) when I have already paid for an OS (32-bit) that was only released 12 months ago
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1.0 out of 5 stars I never thought I'd buy Windows 95..., 3 Oct. 2010
By 
Mrs. D. A. Dilks (worthing, west sussex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
Well, you've read all the other reviews, I am sure. So what makes this one any different?

To start with, we had an old Dell laptop and a Dell desktop, but the desktop had suffered with some form of trojan which took an incredibly long time to fix. The laptop suffered construction issues, so we intended to buy a new one very soon.

However, I had read somewhere that Windows were ready to release an "innovative" new operating system - and I am a large Windows fan at this point in time. I manage to convince my father through a value for money negotiation we should wait for that to come out. So we suffered doing what not on a small hard drive'd laptop on a pillow.

The laptop we got was okay (for the time) featuring an Intel duel core processor, 2gb of ram and double the size of the Dell's.

It was certainly slower.

In fact, before I had modified the Dell desktop, it had an incredible 512mb of ram and a 2.8ghz single core processor. It's speed was beyond that of the new laptop's. Now the Dell sports a 512mb graphics card, 2.5gb of ram and the same processor (I was considering changing the processor, but due to dedications to my custom build, I decided it'll do), but it can't do anything due to not being built with a DVD drive.. oh dear...

So, we're off to a bad start: the operating system features less speed than the becoming dated XP's speed.

We may all go "ooh" and "aah" at the wonderful looking transparent boxes caused by hovering over a desktop icon and much more, but this caused this battery's length to be less than half an hour. So I turned much of this down to max out almost an hour of battery. Save the polar bears.

I create videos (for fun) and game (not that hardcore) - I didn't want to waste installing Sony Vegas on this laptop, so I tried out the new Windows Movie Maker (I had to put recorded videos on there for a reason I'd forgotten) which was a downgrade from the previous Windows Movie Maker. There was less features, things were harder to acess, it crashed more... the works. Wonderful. They took what's probably among the most useless video editors to a serious video creator and made it worse.

Gaming - the morbidly crude truth that I would have to play Halo 2 upon this disapointment sparked some happiness. Maybe I may see the OS shine. Halo 2 is massively fun, yes. However, due to barely passing Gandhi's Microsoft Word minimum spec, it was very slow. This speed caused much unenjoyment. However, I still ponder if I got an extra 2gb of ram and a better graphics card that this would increase. I doubt it, the ram would be wasted on running MSN in another window...

Today I tried running Ubutnu through a memory stick. The memory stick's solid state hard drive could have caused this, but I am not sure - it was much faster and more convienient. It also didn't annoy me as much as Vista with it's toolbar invented to obstruct you from putting it where you want it and how high or low. I actually managed to do what I intended to do...

So, to sum up a metaphor filled story of my experiences with this waste, I picked up a Toshiba Tecra 8100. The boger's a tiny bit slower, with it's Windows 95, 12gb hard drive, 64mb of ram of some form of processor. Although it fell on my mum's head and ceases to work. Shame, I was gonna mode the little boger with the new Windows 7 to put it up against everybody's favourite Vista.
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40 of 48 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A bit prettier a lot pricier- nothing much more to see here, 30 Jan. 2007
By 
Cherry "The techie" (london, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium Edition (PC) (CD-ROM)
Clearly Microsoft feels the need to charge us UK customers nearly double the usa price for the same product. Not withstanding this is a nice addition with some welcome additions that five years of development should bring. Speaking as an IT support adviser, I would clearly tell customers to hold off their purchase, at least until programs such as quickbooks and others become compatible with this operating system and hardware manufacturers such as hp and canon can release drivers to run their printers and faxes. More importantly Vista will reduce the performance of a lot of your day to day applications, even if you upgrade to the 2gb RAM which I recommend. I personally would also encourage users to hold off from purchasing until Microsoft brings the price more reasonably in line with the USA price.

Until then using products such as google desktop, otaku topdesk, picasa zune theme for windows and office 2007 will give you the same benefits and a faster and cheaper life in xp.
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