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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tissues at the ready girls.
I know it's sad...very, very sad, but I cried when I read this book because you feel so much for the poor, innocent, inexperianced, unsophisticated heronine, Hero Wantage who marries Lord Sherringham. He's just been rejected by the beautiful Miss Milbourne and therefore denied his inheritance which can only be unlocked by marriage. In the true bull in a china shop style...
Published on 12 Jun 2010 by victorianwannabe

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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Heyer favourite of mine
Firstly I do adore Heyer having discovered her relatively recently, but this just isn't up there with the best of the best for me. Her books do tend to fall into cohorts and this is one with an innocent heroine and one of the young, immature heroes. Personally I prefer the darker, sardonic and more masterful types (Faro's Daughter, Regency Buck, These Old Shades, Devil's...
Published on 18 Jun 2008 by Roman Clodia


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tissues at the ready girls., 12 Jun 2010
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This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
I know it's sad...very, very sad, but I cried when I read this book because you feel so much for the poor, innocent, inexperianced, unsophisticated heronine, Hero Wantage who marries Lord Sherringham. He's just been rejected by the beautiful Miss Milbourne and therefore denied his inheritance which can only be unlocked by marriage. In the true bull in a china shop style of a man, he says he's going to marry the next woman he sees, and it's none other than Hero, who just so happens to have been in love with 'Sherry' since she was little.
They do marry, Hero, nicknamed 'kitten', is loved by all of Sherry's friends, but not by Sherry himself, too much of a blind idiot to see what a treasure he's got in a wife. Poor Hero is a social disaster, having no idea how to conduct herself, and her husband isn't much help, in fact, he's a bit rubbish at doing anything for her.
Finally, poor Hero runs away, and classically, it's only when Sherry considers what he's lost does he begin to realise Hero's true worth, so finally decideing to bite the bullet and be a man, he goes after her, and Hero is more than happy to have him.
You don't fall in love with Lord Sherringham as you do other Heyer heros, just because he can be such an idiot, and sometimes the way he treats poor Hero is just so sad, but he does redeem himself and it's just as well, because by the time the book ends, so does your packet of tissues.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Favourite Heyer, 14 Nov 2007
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
All Georgette Heyer's novels are the same. The hero and heroine battle the odds and fall in love. Seems so simple, yet each book is different and delightful in its own way. Nearly all are set in Regency England, including this one. Heyer is a superb historian with a wonderful eye for detail and a fantastic ear for dialogue. This book is advertised in quite a menacing way, but is anything but. It is full of gentle humour and fantastically romantic and ridiculous escapades that it is a joy to read. Here, an arrogant young man, thwarted in what he believes is the love of his life, makes do with a childhood girlfriend as the 'booby' prize. Naturally, she does and always will, loves him passionately, but he's too much of a ninnyhammer to see it. The trials and tribulations of their love life are silly and frivolous and just perfect in every way. My mother used to read these books when I was a child, and I discovered them when I had children of my own. On a grey day, when all is against you and nothing in the world is right, there is nothing better than a hot bath, some fluffy pyjamas and this book to set the world to rights again.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Witty , Charming , Excellent Characters , Heyer's best, 8 Nov 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
What can I say about this book just pick it up and you forget everything ,you are transported back to regency england with these splendid characters. The hero and his sidekicks made me laugh out loud several times , the detail of the clothes and the period is amazing . No one can touch Georgette Heyer for regency romance
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "A true regency romance, 18 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
I have loved Georgette Heyer books for many years but this one along with "The Talisman Ring" I consider to be my favourites. Her romances are so true to that period of time that no other writer has been able to capture. She includes the regency slang of that period and you actually feel you are in the 1800s. For anyone who truly wants to know what Regency England "sounded like" read Georgette Heyer. I only wish this talented lady had written more novels during her lifetime!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oh Dear....., 29 Oct 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
This is in my opinion the best G.H book ever written, but dosent the summary look bleak! This is quite simply an amusing charming tale in which two people fall in love through some of the best Georgie Heyer antics yet...
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A delightful and funny romp through Regency era London society, 24 July 2009
This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
After years of hearing the praises of author Georgette Heyer, I could no longer resist the temptation and dove in head first on the recommendation of Heyer enthusiast Vic (Ms. Place) of Jane Austen's World, selecting the author's favorite book Friday's Child. Since Heyer published 56 books over 53 years, she had a few to choose from and I was confident that this neophyte would have one of the better novels to begin my indoctrination. I now see what all the fuss is about. Georgette Heyer is a treasure.

Spendthrift Anthony Verelst, Viscount Sheringham doesn't give a fig about his finances until his creditors do. Selfish, impetuous and deeply in debt, he is unable to access his inheritance until he reaches 25 or marries and sets out to acquire a wife proposing to his neighbor and lifelong friend Isabella Milborne, an `Incomparable', whose beauty and elegance are renown. She doesn't think much of the idea or of Lord Sheringham's dissipated lifestyle and rebuffs the offer. Indignant, he swears to marry the next girl he sees who happens to be seventeen year old Hero Wantage, the neighborhood orphan Cinderella living with cousins who want to farm her out to be a governess. By no means a scholar, Hero is miffed by the work plan just wanting to have a bit of fun and enjoy the charms of society in London. Seizing the opportunity, Hero accepts Sherry's proposal and they run away to London to be married. It is here we are introduced to the real heart of the story, Sherry's three male friends: his two cousins steady Gilbert (Gil) Ringwood and the foppish Hon. Ferdinand (Ferdy) Fakenham, and his hot headed friend George, Lord Wrotham who form sort of a bumbling bachelors club of Regency society dandies. Their influence drives the story as they help Hero (nicknamed Kitten) unschooled in the nuances of social etiquette and a bit lacking in common sense out of all sorts of scrapes that threaten her reputation and infuriate her husband who in turn is as equally clueless about his own responsibilities as a newly married man.

Heyer gives us a delightful view of Regency era London with its social outlets for the rich: fashion, dancing, parties, gambling, romantic intrigues, and the gambit of other frivolous extravagances that entertain the high society 'ton' world. Her characters are each distinctive in personality and well drawn out. The three bachelor friends were especially enjoyable as their priceless dialogue humorously captures that uniquely British drawing room chatter of "I dare says" and "dash it alls" that at times from other authors seems trite, but in this case just lifted the colloquial credibility and ambience. Even though this novel was written over sixty years ago, it is surprisingly superior in style and creativity to many being produced today. Friday's Child reads like an expertly paced stage play, and I felt the influence of Heyer's contemporaries in playwrights Noel Coward and George Bernard Shaw in the satirical social commentary and humorous biting dialogues. There were a few holes in the plot such as Sherry's concerns over his uncle's abuse of the trusteeship of his estate not materializing or Hero's continual naļveté among others, but they were very minor and did not spoil my enjoyment. The gradual maturity and transition by both protagonists gave for a rewarding end. It is easy to see why so many Jane Austen fans adore Georgette Heyer as they share in the sisterhood of the `Gentle Reprove Society' of comedic social satire. Friday's Child matched it's namesake from the old nursery rhyme as loving and giving, and critics marginalizing Heyer's works as mere romances take heed. Like Austen's novels, this is so much more than Chicklit.

Laurel Ann, Austenprose
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of Them All, 14 Sep 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
Although I have read all of Georgette Heyer's novels, this is the only one which has ever made me cry. Ms. Heyer is a stylistic master, and here she neatly balances the comedy of the ridiculous with romance and pathos. Terrific supporting cast, as well as a memorable heroine. The best novel of them all.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars makes you cry with laughter, 11 May 2007
This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
This is such a funny romantic story. I devoured this book in less than two days and enjoyed every minute of it. I was sad to leave the characters at the end. I loved some of the supporting characters especially ferdy who seems to always be drunk and confused. The novel to a large extent seem to be on the hero Sherry growing up and accepting responsibility in his life and realising that you don't know what you've got till its gone.

Definitely a book for keeps!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Of Heyer's Best Books, 7 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Friday's Child (Paperback)
This is my favourite book by Georgette Heyer. It's charming characters came to life as I read it in one enchanted setting.
After beening spurned by the season's Comparable Isabella, Lord Anthony Sheringham (or Sherry as he is known to his friends) declares he shall marry the first women he sets his eyes upon- a necesscity if he is to come into his inheritance.
Fortunately for Miss Hero Wattage, the first lady he mets on his way back to London is her. Ophaned Hero, left in her odious Aunt's care, jumps at the chance to escape her future as a governess- and to marry the man she has always loved.
After eloping to London, Hero, with no one to council her but her husband, falls into scrape after scrape and, after charming all of her husband's close friends, feels the happiest she ever did in her short, miserable life. But after one scrape too many she flees her unloving husband. Happily all is resolved, and by the end of the book a joyful ending is a certainty.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Perfect Introduction to Georgette Heyer!, 12 Oct 2001
By A Customer
For those unfamiliar with Georgette Heyer's regency romances, this is the perfect introduction!
And for those who are put off by the idea of a romance, these books are so mistakenly classified as "romance"!! They are books of history, social commentary, and above all humour. Heyer's characters are engaging and humorous, and her historical and social settings are meticulously researched. She includes genuine historical personages, wound into the story, and presents an amazingly clear picture of London society life in these times.
Above all, the stories rattle along at a fast pace; you will be unable to stop listening!
This is the story of Kit, a young bride introduced into London Society for the first time. In this way this is the perfect story for the reader's introduction into the world about which Georgette Heyer writes. The young debutante's social gaffes and mistakes inspire much of the hilarity of the book; Kit is one of the most charming but also hilarious protagonists.
A wonderfully detailed, engaging story; nicely narrated.
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Friday's Child
Friday's Child by georgette heyer (Hardcover - 1946)
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