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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get blown away, 18 Mar 2004
By 
Aj Viljoen (Kuwait) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Salisbury (Audio CD)
This was recorded by the "old" Uriah Heep, in the "old" days and is in my opinion their best album ever.
The listener is treated to a little bit of everything. It is moody, atmospheric, even almost gothic. After how many years, this is still one of my all-time favourite albums. I will never tire of this...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic, 5 Aug 2009
By 
Julian Stevens (BRISTOL, UK United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Salisbury (Audio CD)
Salisbury was Heep's second album and much less commercially successful than both its preceding debut, Very `Eavy, Very `Umble (which I never really got into) and Look At Yourself (which I very much did). However, apparently Lady In Black to close S.1 was released as a single and scored quite a hit in Germany, if not in the UK.

This was when the band's ever changing lineup comprised David Byron (lead vocals), Ken Hensley (organ, piano, guitars, harpsichord, vibes & vocals), Mick Box (guitars & vocals), Keith Baker (drums) and Paul Newton (electric bass), which for me was a fivesome never bettered by later incarnations of Heep. As with many other UH albums of this era, this one was recorded at the now sadly gone Lansdowne Studios in West London and produced by Bronze Records head honcho Gerry Bron.

That aside, Salisbury has always been my favourite UH album, particularly The Park and the long title suite which occupied most of Side 2 of the original vinyl. Salisbury (the track) was a great blend of rock and jazz influences with a full orchestra ~ far better than Deep Purple's attempt at much the same thing with their Live at the Albert Hall album from a year earlier. The jazz undercurrent to this album develops fully in the title suite, which I think is why it caught my ear before I ever consciously realised I liked jazz. Apart from that, the whole thing's darned good anyway yet, due to commercial pressures I imagine, they never did another remotely like it, at least not like the title suite. Ken Hensley writes in the sleeve notes that "the thing that strikes me [about this album] is that we were able to explore so many different musical directions and themes. As the band grew in fame, that aspect went away and contributed a great deal to my frustration and disappointment". Hmmm.

The original vinyl issue (which I still have) was thick and dynamically compressed, whilst the first CD reissue was unlistenably bright and steely. But this edition was digitally remastered by Mike Brown and Robert Corich in July 1995 and is vastly better than the original CD reissue ~ the DR edition can be identified by two bonus tracks, Simon The Bullet Freak (which doesn't fit in with the main album any better than its title suggests) and a single version of High Priestess. The cover pic of a Chieftain tank on manoeuvres was always great too. Yeah, one of my all time faves. The more I listen to it the more I love it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bluesy hard rock goes progressive & jazzy, 6 Aug 2010
By 
Alister King "Big Al" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Salisbury (Audio CD)
Bluesy hard rock goes progressive via a 26-piece orchestra and some jazzy noodling. Excellent! Its all about the title track Salisbury which takes up almost all of side 2. The orchestra kick things off by stating the main theme loudly with strings & wind. These back off to leave an bassoon plodding around a Peer Gynt type riff before coming back to full orchestra. Its time to bring in the band now via a simple 1,2,3 drum fill. This paves the way for the vocals. Its a pompous, romantic love song. After a few verses we move into what would be the 3rd movement; a jazzy, walking bass line sets the pass, with a swinging drum beat, and provides the back drop for some groovy horn work. We're now getting to the sweet spot of the entire piece; 3 glorious, long sustain wah-wah solos by the under-rated Mick Box. Each one is chock full of awesome licks, high speed picking and great ideas, and builds on its predecessor to great effect. One is almost exhausted at this point so its a quick repeat of the main theme, a pause and then a slow drum roll picking up speed gradually as the orchestra noodle about discordantly brining things to a climax. Brilliant. We dont get that anymore.
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Salisbury
Salisbury by Uriah Heep (Audio CD - 2009)
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