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68 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of Hammer's finest
Ahh... 'Twins of Evil.' This film will always be dear to me. Growing up in the late 80's/early 90's, still too young to rent any Nightmare on Elm Street or Friday the 13th videos, most of the horror movies I had easy access to were the late-night Hammer Horrors on ITV. Most of interest were the almost innumerable vampire movies the studio produced, from the greats...
Published on 25 Sept. 2007 by mr-benn

versus
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 'FANGS FOR THE MEMORIES'
Always a Hammer Horror vampire fan I saw this when it was first released back in 1971 and again recently on DVD. Way back then when Hammer was battling with the USA to top the horror movie market, Hammer usually came up trumps, with their lavish costumes, gothic architecture and scripts of dialogue which would make Shakespeare smile. Hammer by then had divided their...
Published on 30 Nov. 2010 by JIMBO (Dublin,)


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68 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of Hammer's finest, 25 Sept. 2007
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This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Ahh... 'Twins of Evil.' This film will always be dear to me. Growing up in the late 80's/early 90's, still too young to rent any Nightmare on Elm Street or Friday the 13th videos, most of the horror movies I had easy access to were the late-night Hammer Horrors on ITV. Most of interest were the almost innumerable vampire movies the studio produced, from the greats ('Horror of Dracula') to the not-so greats ('Dracula AD 1972'). Yet somehow, in my formative years, no film stayed with me as much as 'Twins of Evil.'

No small part of the appeal are the delectable Collinson twins as Maria and Frida, orphaned Italians sent to live with their tyranical uncle (yet another star turn from the great Peter Cushing). This was, of course, early 70's Hammer, when the technicolour gore of old was supplemented with the thrill of a bit of sultry female flesh - the film was indeed designed with the Collinsons in mind, fresh from their breakthrough as Playboy's first double centrefold! That said, by modern standards the sexual content is fairly tame: there are only a few brief moments of nudity, but heaving corsetted bosoms aplenty, and a deluge of suggestive imagery - witness the hand that strokes the candlestick, and the way Frida's eyes light up at the words "stripped naked!"

The cheap and cheerful atmosphere that Hammer movies are famed for is here in full force, with lots of blatant day-for-night photography, flimsy sets and primitive special effects. This, of course, is all part of what makes these films so endearing - but it shouldn't be taken to mean the power to shock is not there. A scene of human sacrifice and a phenomal decapitation can still get a jump out of the viewer today.

Those new to Hammer could find worse places to start; those who love Hammer will be in their element. Buy it now! Or I'll be sending Gustav and the boys around.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This film has its knockers - but I quite like it!, 5 Mar. 2011
This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Here's Hammer at its purest, if not its best - a perfect mix of class, cheese and sheer nonsense. The class element is of course Peter Cushing who anchors the film as the scariest witch-hunter this side of Vincent Price (what was it with all these witch obsessed movies of the early 70s? Conservative backlash against 60s promiscuity? - there was something in the air for sure) Anyway it turns out that Cushings character, Gustav Weill, actually has a point - amidst the heaving bosoms and bouffant hairdos there are devilish vampire ladies abroad, his own niece for one, who has fallen under the spell of the resident evil Count. Absurdities include a mute, pec flexing black manservant (why?), the same witch burning scene repeated again and again until its power has gone, cheapo looking sets, bad dubbed acting - I could go on, but the fact is, for all its faults this is a highly entertaining piece of schlock, if light years from Hammers peak (imo the Brides of Dracula/Revenge of Frankenstein period). In short, well worth a look but don't expect the power and verisimilitude of its contemporaries, Witchfinder General or Blood On Satans Claw
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars hammer horror twins, 31 Jan. 2012
By 
Su (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Peter Cushing stars as a witch hunter in this 1971 Hammer Horror movie.

Gustav Weil (Peter Cushing) is the leader of a group of men who, in Count Karnstein's own words "like to burn pretty girls". The reasons behind these dreadful actions can be anything from a young woman who has "refused to marry" (in other words she had the temerity to turn someone in the "committee" down) to living too close to someone who died.

Into this world of fear and intimidation arrive twins Maria and Frieda Gellhorn from their home in Vienna. Since their parents are now dead they must stay with the domineering Uncle and his down at heel wife, Katy (Kathleen Byron).

The village is dominated by Castle Karnstein where the reigning Count Karnstein (Damien Thomas) wishes to be as evil as his predecessors and calls on the Lord of Darkness to show him the way as he plunges a knife into a young helpless woman who has been provided by sycophant Dietrich (Dennis Price). As the blood runs down from the alter it falls a crack in the stone and onto the shrouded corpse below and his appeals to Satan are answered with the appearance of the long dead Countess Mircalla Karnstein (Katya Wyeth).

After a session of ancestral slap-and-tickle a vampire is born.

Twins of Evil doesn't just show the pack mentality of people (in this case the brotherhood men) when looking for something to kill, and the ease that the "righteous" have in justifying their own murders while condemning others, it also shows that identical twins aren't simply (almost) perfect copies of each other, but they have personalities of their own.

Maria Gellhorn (Mary Collinson) is a quieter, shyer more obedience and fearful girl, while her sister Frieda (Madelaine Collinson) is more knowledgeable and overtly uses her femininity to get what she wants, in fact she is not past torturing her own sister. It is only a matter of time before Freida and Karnstein run into each other - but what will Uncle Gustav say, or for that matter, what will he do.

Prior to this film the Malta born Collinson twins were noted for their appearances in Playboy, but don't let that put you off, they are in fact quite good in this film

Cushing steals the show as the marvellously maniacal Gustav Weil. It is a shame that ill health limited Dennis Price's appearance as his fearful fawning showed a degree of acting skill that many of the younger cast could have done with learning from.

This was one of the Hammer Horror films that took the Dracula movie away from direct linkage to Dracula alone and opened vampirism as a possibility for anyone - the result has been movies such as The Lost Boys, Near Dark and even the Twilight saga, along with the True Blood TV series.

Twins of Evil is an enjoyable Hammer Horror film.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Playmates & The Vampire, 26 May 2010
By 
This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS REVIEW CONTAINS PLOT INFORMATION AND POTENTIAL SPOILERS.

"Twins Of Evil" (1971) is the third and arguably the best film of Hammer's "Karnstein" trilogy. Like "The Vampire Lovers" and "Lust For A Vampire", the first two films of the trilogy, "Twins Of Evil" was written by Tudor Gates (nice name) and produced by Harry Fine and Michael Style. The film certainly begins in fine style with a group of men on horses, all dressed in the same clobber (the men, not the horses), riding through the forest at night. These men are Puritans known as The Brotherhood and their leader is the fanatical Gustav Weil (Peter Cushing in top form). They are out in search of witches, Devil-worshippers and anyone else that they think has succumbed to the powers of darkness.

The Brotherhood tend to target sexy young women and they find one (a woodman's daughter) and then burn her at the stake because they believe that fire destroys the evil within and purifies the soul. The opening credits roll, accompanied by a rousing theme tune that perhaps would have been more suitable for a western, and we are then properly into the film....

Two beautiful, identical twin sisters (played by Playboy Playmates Mary and Madeleine Collinson), both wearing the same bright green outfits, arrive by coach in the village of Karnstein. They are called Maria and Frieda Gellhorn and Gustav Weil is their uncle. Maria (Mary Collinson) is basically a good girl but Frieda (Madeleine Collinson) has a wicked side to her nature. They have come to stay with Gustav and his wife, Katy (Kathleen Byron), following the death of their parents. Their arrival causes much interest amongst the locals but when Gustav sees them he is outraged that they have neglected to wear black so soon after their parents' funeral.

When night falls Gustav is out with the lads again, hunting for more witches (well it makes a change from just going down to the pub for a few pints and a game of darts, I suppose). This time they are after a promiscuous woman called Gerta (played by the luscious Luan Peters) who lives in the woods. As it happens Gerta is one of Count Karnstein's floosies and when Gustav and his gang arrive at her hut The Count is there, shacked-up with her. Gustav and The Count cross verbal swords with each other and eventually Gustav reaches for his flintlock pistol in order to shoot The Count. However, Joachim, The Count's mute bodyguard (who's built like a brick.... well, you get the picture), stands in the way. The Count tells Joachim to step aside and warns Gustav that if he fires then The Emperor will have him and all his men hanged. Naturally Gustav backs off and he and the rest of The Brotherhood ride off into the night. Gustav and his men then discover the body of a man who appears to have been bitten by a vampire. They see a young woman walking alone on the road and charge her down, believing her to be the perpetrator of the evil deed. Another one for the fire lads!

Meanwhile, later that night, all sorts of debauchery is taking place up at Karnstein Castle. A group of people and a local peasant girl supplied by the sleazy pimp Dietrich (wonderfully played by the brilliant Dennis Price) are indulging in a mock-black mass ceremony for The Count's entertainment. The Count is not impressed though and calls them a bunch of charlatans and tells them to get out. The Count himself then picks up a dagger and sacrifices the girl in an attempt to call up The Devil. The girl's blood runs into a sepulchre containing the corpse of Mircalla (a.k.a. Marcilla/Carmilla) Karnstein and anyone who has seen the first two movies knows all too well what she is famous for! Mircalla is resurrected and, after indulging in a bit of saucy stuff with Count Karnstein, bites The Count on the neck, turning him into a vampire.

The next day Maria and Frieda begin classes at the local school which is run by Anton Hoffer (played by future Italian horror movie superstar David Warbeck) and his sister, Ingrid (played by the lovely Isobel Black from Hammer's "Kiss Of The Vampire"). Nobody can tell the two sisters apart except for Anton who says later that "Frieda has a kind of fire inside her." Whilst at school Frieda spots Count Karnstein who is visiting the village and she becomes infatuated by him. It's strange but The Count casts no reflection in a mirror but he can move around in broad daylight! Gustav arrives and warns Count Karnstein to stay away from his nieces. That night Frieda escapes from her room and goes up to the castle and it is not long before The Count bites her and makes her a vampire too. Shortly after her initiation, more people start turning up dead, bearing the mark of the vampire. Frieda's victims include Dietrich and Ingrid but when she attacks a member of The Brotherhood, Gustav and his men capture her and plan to burn her at the stake.

Whilst Frieda is imprisoned, Count Karnstein comes to her rescue and swaps Frieda for Maria, who is still innocent. Luckily Anton susses out what has happened and arrives in time to prevent Maria from being frazzled. Anton tells Gustav and his men that fire is no good to destroy vampires and that they must be destroyed by a stake through the heart or by decapitation. This sets up an eventful climax that sees The Brotherhood and the other villagers storming the castle armed with a variety of weapons in grand old horror movie tradition. The Count is confident that he cannot be destroyed but after playing a quick game of Give Us A Clue with his bodyguard he learns that the villagers are armed with wooden stakes and axes and suddenly he is not quite so cocky....

I love this film and it is worth watching mainly for Peter Cushing's superb performance as the ranting religious fanatic, Gustav Weil. I consider this to be one of Peter's greatest ever roles and he really dominates this movie. The rest of the cast is pretty good too though and it is good to see two horror movie legends Peter Cushing and David Warbeck locking horns in some scenes. Dennis Price is suitably slimy as Dietrich and Damien Thomas is in full-on villainous mode as Count Karnstein who oozes evil at every opportunity and enjoys taunting Gustav and his men. The real surprise package here though is the Collinson sisters who are rather good as the titular twins (although only one of them actually becomes something evil) and they look very tasty as well! It's worth mentioning that this film also features Harvey Hall as one of Gustav's Brotherhood colleagues. Harvey also appeared in the other two Karnstein films and appeared with David Warbeck again in "The Sex Thief".

Unlike the the first two installments of the Karnstein trilogy, "Twins Of Evil" shifted the emphasis away from sex and nudity and moved it more towards horror and violence. Sure, this movie does contain a fair amount of eroticism but there are also plenty of gruesome moments too. If you like Hammer films or old vampire movies then you should definitely check out this classic film.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another great Hammer vampire thriller to sink your teeth into, 2 Oct. 2009
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This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Great vampire movie made during the time Hammer studios decided to show off more 'skin' with their beauties - Twins of Evil stars Peter Cushing in a great role as a priest. Most viewers automatically will think he is the villain in this but by the end you will wonder if he is or isnt
2 relatives of his - sexy young 'Twins' visit him - one gets involved with a vampire while the other plays the heroine. This contains the usual hammer gore, maybe a little stronger in this movie and it contains gratuitous nudity - so it ain't for children folks..
Bloody entertaining, a fine horror movie and a must for Cushing fans...
The DVD is widescreen and contains all deleted footage that was apparently on older releases (DVD or VHS)
This is the one to get from Optimum Entertainment..Cool booklet too...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT BLU-RAY, 24 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: Twins of Evil [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Great Blu-ray, and for me one of the best hammer horror films. Peter cushing(legend) plays a fanatical puritan and leader of a witch hunting sect, he is just amazing in his roll, this and Dracula 1972 are his best hammer films he has done, well for me anyway, but then again everything he did he put 100% in to it, he was truly great actor.

I have seen most hammer Blu-ray releases and they are good, but this one has been the best so far the picture quality and sound is very good. The disc comes with some good features I have listed them below.

Original Theatrical Trailers and TV spots
Deleted Scene
Extensive Image Galleries
PDF Material
Commemorative Booklet
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic good print as if it was only made yesterday wee ..., 11 Dec. 2014
By 
John Hogg "hoggy" (Glasgow) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Twins of Evil [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
classic good print as if it was only made yesterday wee all know the story so if you want a good transfer add this one to your classic bluray collection
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great sound and picture quality...definitely as you would hope from a Blu-ray disc., 8 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: Twins of Evil [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
...And this is certainly one of the best Hammer movies ever made in terms of excellent studio sets, cinematography, sound, etc. Pretty cool too to see Peter Cushing in the paradoxical role of cruel witch-hunter but also hero to a degree I'm not sure he did in any other movie. 5 stars for sure.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fangs For The Memory...., 9 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: Twins of Evil [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Another classic Hammer moment from the 70's. One of the best of that era, boosted by another great performance from the legend that was Peter Cushing. Excellent and essential release, great looking Blu Ray with interesting extra features and a collectors booklet included. Buy it now!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 11 Sept. 2014
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This review is from: Twins of Evil [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Excellent late Hammer film and a superb print, crisp and clear picture. Previously owned the Carlton release and this is a big improvement. Decent extras as well.
Hoping for a UK release of 'Vampire Circus' 'Dr Jekyll & Sister Hyde' & 'Captain Kronos-Vampire Hunter' soon!
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Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD]
Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] by John Hough (DVD - 2006)
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