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66 of 67 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of Hammer's finest
Ahh... 'Twins of Evil.' This film will always be dear to me. Growing up in the late 80's/early 90's, still too young to rent any Nightmare on Elm Street or Friday the 13th videos, most of the horror movies I had easy access to were the late-night Hammer Horrors on ITV. Most of interest were the almost innumerable vampire movies the studio produced, from the greats...
Published on 25 Sep 2007 by mr-benn

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Collinsons are eye candy, but the film feels too campy.
Twins of Evil wraps up the Karnstein trilogy of Hammer films though apart from a very brief resurrection scene there is no connection with the other films. Peter Cushing as always is great, though feels underused and the reason for that is the stunning Collinson twins- no question about it in their heydey they were beautiful. But I'm afraid their acting skills don't go...
Published 5 months ago by Colonel Decker


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66 of 67 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of Hammer's finest, 25 Sep 2007
By 
This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Ahh... 'Twins of Evil.' This film will always be dear to me. Growing up in the late 80's/early 90's, still too young to rent any Nightmare on Elm Street or Friday the 13th videos, most of the horror movies I had easy access to were the late-night Hammer Horrors on ITV. Most of interest were the almost innumerable vampire movies the studio produced, from the greats ('Horror of Dracula') to the not-so greats ('Dracula AD 1972'). Yet somehow, in my formative years, no film stayed with me as much as 'Twins of Evil.'

No small part of the appeal are the delectable Collinson twins as Maria and Frida, orphaned Italians sent to live with their tyranical uncle (yet another star turn from the great Peter Cushing). This was, of course, early 70's Hammer, when the technicolour gore of old was supplemented with the thrill of a bit of sultry female flesh - the film was indeed designed with the Collinsons in mind, fresh from their breakthrough as Playboy's first double centrefold! That said, by modern standards the sexual content is fairly tame: there are only a few brief moments of nudity, but heaving corsetted bosoms aplenty, and a deluge of suggestive imagery - witness the hand that strokes the candlestick, and the way Frida's eyes light up at the words "stripped naked!"

The cheap and cheerful atmosphere that Hammer movies are famed for is here in full force, with lots of blatant day-for-night photography, flimsy sets and primitive special effects. This, of course, is all part of what makes these films so endearing - but it shouldn't be taken to mean the power to shock is not there. A scene of human sacrifice and a phenomal decapitation can still get a jump out of the viewer today.

Those new to Hammer could find worse places to start; those who love Hammer will be in their element. Buy it now! Or I'll be sending Gustav and the boys around.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another great Hammer vampire thriller to sink your teeth into, 2 Oct 2009
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This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Great vampire movie made during the time Hammer studios decided to show off more 'skin' with their beauties - Twins of Evil stars Peter Cushing in a great role as a priest. Most viewers automatically will think he is the villain in this but by the end you will wonder if he is or isnt
2 relatives of his - sexy young 'Twins' visit him - one gets involved with a vampire while the other plays the heroine. This contains the usual hammer gore, maybe a little stronger in this movie and it contains gratuitous nudity - so it ain't for children folks..
Bloody entertaining, a fine horror movie and a must for Cushing fans...
The DVD is widescreen and contains all deleted footage that was apparently on older releases (DVD or VHS)
This is the one to get from Optimum Entertainment..Cool booklet too...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hammer horror at its best, 20 Mar 2012
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This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
On of the last great vampire films produced by hammer, made in 1971 twins of evil is the third and arguably the best film of a trilogy, the vampire lovers and lust for a vampire are the first two, there is a brilliant decapitation scene in this film and in my opinion its the best one that hammer ever shot, one of the strongest points is peter cushing's performance which is outstanding and one of his best while being supported by a strong cast and great directing by john hough.The transfer is excellent and the extra's include a deleted scene, the original theatrical trailer and an image gallery, this dvd also comes with a booklet of viewing notes and overall its a great film, great release and a great addition to any hammer fans collection
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This film has its knockers - but I quite like it!, 5 Mar 2011
This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Here's Hammer at its purest, if not its best - a perfect mix of class, cheese and sheer nonsense. The class element is of course Peter Cushing who anchors the film as the scariest witch-hunter this side of Vincent Price (what was it with all these witch obsessed movies of the early 70s? Conservative backlash against 60s promiscuity? - there was something in the air for sure) Anyway it turns out that Cushings character, Gustav Weill, actually has a point - amidst the heaving bosoms and bouffant hairdos there are devilish vampire ladies abroad, his own niece for one, who has fallen under the spell of the resident evil Count. Absurdities include a mute, pec flexing black manservant (why?), the same witch burning scene repeated again and again until its power has gone, cheapo looking sets, bad dubbed acting - I could go on, but the fact is, for all its faults this is a highly entertaining piece of schlock, if light years from Hammers peak (imo the Brides of Dracula/Revenge of Frankenstein period). In short, well worth a look but don't expect the power and verisimilitude of its contemporaries, Witchfinder General or Blood On Satans Claw
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "The Devil has sent me Twins of Evil!", 9 July 2012
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
"We are the undead, and the mirror sees only the living. We walk the earth, but we exist only in Hell."

Hammer may have been headed for the grave itself in the early 70s as its horror films were increasingly being dumped on the market in two-for-the-price-of-one double-bills, but 1971's Twins of Evil showed that they could still turn out a great film. The conclusion of their really only geographically related Karnstein trilogy (following The Vampire Lovers and Lust for a Vampire) inspired by the works of Sheridan Le Fanu, it's the best and certainly the most morally complex of their tits'n'fangs offerings, thanks to strong writing and an absolutely committed and electrifying performance from Peter Cushing that's one of his very best. As the puritanically fanatical witch hunter Gustav Weil he rides the countryside with his `Brotherhood' of morally self-righteous serial killers looking for witches to burn, their definition of witches generally coming down to poor attractive single women. He's chillingly convincing in his absolute self-belief, never overplaying or straying into ham.

A man driven to evil by his misguided belief that he's doing God's work, he's about to be supplanted as the biggest threat to Karnstein's womenfolk by Damien Thomas's local Count, who's bored by the sham Satanic shows his procurer Dennis Price provides and wants to try the real thing just like his ancestors did. Summoning up centuries dead ancestor Countess Mircalla with an unwilling blood donation from a peasant girl to indulge in a spot of simultaneous incest and necrophilia, it's not long before the newly vampiric count sets his sights on Weil's two beautiful identical twin nieces. Naturally, as movie tradition dictates, one is good, the other evil, and it's not long before the latter's virtuous sister is paying for her bad deeds and the bodies are mounting up. Just as naturally, faced with a genuine supernatural evil, Weil and his miserable band don't have the courage to go after the politically connected Count, no matter how much he mocks their hypocritical piety as he goes about his wicked ways ("Some men like a musical evening. Weil and his friends find their pleasure in burning innocent girls."). Unfortunately it's up to the wishy-washy dishy local choirmaster and teacher David Warbeck to try to guide him to his rightful enemy...

Produced in fine style by Harry Fine and Michael Style with a smart script by Tudor Gates, even though it's a period piece it neatly tailors the staples of the genres for its own era. The Count's evening pursuits taps into the rise in suburban Satanism in 70s Britain as an excuse for swingers' parties while attacking the puritanical censoriousness that was also rampant at the time - it's no accident that when Kathleen Byron's loyal wife finally stands up to her husband she asks him "Have you ever thought that you might have helped beat the devil into her?" Alongside much better performances than the norm for the genre, there's some real imagination in John Hough's direction, the resurrection of Mircala and her appearance in a giant shroud among the best and most eerie scenes in the Hammer canon. It's also driven by a superb score by Harry Robinson that's justly celebrated for it's remarkable and exciting main theme that treats the film as a dark spaghetti western - an idea which works magnificently - but which is also a lot more subtle, complicated and varied in the main body of the film. All in all one of Hammer's most satisfying gothic horrors.

While Synapse Films' Region A-locked Blu-ray of Vampire Circus offered a problematic transfer that left some scenes too dark to pick out detail while others were superb, this is a much more consistent and pleasing transfer of the uncut version, and it's accompanied by some excellent extras. Pride of place goes to the documentary The Flesh and The Fury - X-posing Twins of Evil, which covers a lot of ground in its 84-minute running time from the decline of Hammer, the making of the Karnstein trilogy and even some slightly naff dramatisations of Le Fanu's Carmilla with archive footage and interviews with Hough, Thomas, Joe Dante, Christopher Frayling, David J. Skal and others. There's also a featurette on Ward Kinsey's collection of vintage Hammer props, isolated music and effects track, stills gallery, 3 TV spots, US theatrical trailer (but not the UK one with different captions that makes much of Damien Thomas as the studio's new `master of horror') and trailer for US double-bill with Hands of the Ripper. There's also a deleted musical number that was dropped from the film at the last minute, where Warbeck and his students sing a wonderfully anachronistic `sort of hymn' called True Love, which never made it to the soundtrack album. It's definitely an improvement on Network's very good PAL DVD release, which included the deleted scene, trailer and a booklet.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Witchfinder meets Van Helsing, 2 Mar 2008
By 
Kenneth Lewis "Re-Animator" (UK Liverpool) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Twins of Evil is the last and by far the best of the hammer Le-Fanu vampire trilogy the other two being Vampire Lovers and Lust for a Vampire. Twins of Evil ditches the male lesbian fantasy of the other two films and gives us a good old fashioned gothic horror with a twist. What I like about twins of evil (besides the very pretty twins) is Peter Cushings character. He is a witchfinder who just happens to have actually found someone evil in the evil Baron.Unlike Van Helsing he is not careful or considered he just rushes in to kill anyone he judges as evil.

The plot two pretty twins go to stay with their uncle(Cushing) who has a hobby which consists of dressing up and hunting down and burning evil doers (mostly young single women). He is however unable to act against the brash baron (damien thomas) because he has friend in high places. The Baron grows board with his debauched ways and decides to sacrifice himself to become a vampire. He then sets his sights on the beautiful twins one is eager one isnt which is which? Another fine mess for mr Cushing to sort out. The film is quite well done with some tense moments and an excellent atmosphere. Some good ideas to one I like is that you cant become a vampire unless you are evil if you are good and bitten by a vampire you just die mores the pity!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sexy twins, Peter Cushing...... Vampires!, 11 Jun 2013
By 
Der Spiess (Loverly London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Come on what bloke don't want that. 3rd in the trilogy of films and possibly the best. Sex, Vampires and Peter Cushing. Honestly what more do you want...Jam on it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars hammer horror twins, 31 Jan 2012
By 
Su (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Peter Cushing stars as a witch hunter in this 1971 Hammer Horror movie.

Gustav Weil (Peter Cushing) is the leader of a group of men who, in Count Karnstein's own words "like to burn pretty girls". The reasons behind these dreadful actions can be anything from a young woman who has "refused to marry" (in other words she had the temerity to turn someone in the "committee" down) to living too close to someone who died.

Into this world of fear and intimidation arrive twins Maria and Frieda Gellhorn from their home in Vienna. Since their parents are now dead they must stay with the domineering Uncle and his down at heel wife, Katy (Kathleen Byron).

The village is dominated by Castle Karnstein where the reigning Count Karnstein (Damien Thomas) wishes to be as evil as his predecessors and calls on the Lord of Darkness to show him the way as he plunges a knife into a young helpless woman who has been provided by sycophant Dietrich (Dennis Price). As the blood runs down from the alter it falls a crack in the stone and onto the shrouded corpse below and his appeals to Satan are answered with the appearance of the long dead Countess Mircalla Karnstein (Katya Wyeth).

After a session of ancestral slap-and-tickle a vampire is born.

Twins of Evil doesn't just show the pack mentality of people (in this case the brotherhood men) when looking for something to kill, and the ease that the "righteous" have in justifying their own murders while condemning others, it also shows that identical twins aren't simply (almost) perfect copies of each other, but they have personalities of their own.

Maria Gellhorn (Mary Collinson) is a quieter, shyer more obedience and fearful girl, while her sister Frieda (Madelaine Collinson) is more knowledgeable and overtly uses her femininity to get what she wants, in fact she is not past torturing her own sister. It is only a matter of time before Freida and Karnstein run into each other - but what will Uncle Gustav say, or for that matter, what will he do.

Prior to this film the Malta born Collinson twins were noted for their appearances in Playboy, but don't let that put you off, they are in fact quite good in this film

Cushing steals the show as the marvellously maniacal Gustav Weil. It is a shame that ill health limited Dennis Price's appearance as his fearful fawning showed a degree of acting skill that many of the younger cast could have done with learning from.

This was one of the Hammer Horror films that took the Dracula movie away from direct linkage to Dracula alone and opened vampirism as a possibility for anyone - the result has been movies such as The Lost Boys, Near Dark and even the Twilight saga, along with the True Blood TV series.

Twins of Evil is an enjoyable Hammer Horror film.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Finally have this film., 4 July 2011
This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
I am estatic to finally have a copy of the film.
Of course the best part is watching the great Peter Cushing showing why he is so respected by once again being the reason to enjoy this film.
The story is trite having Cushing in it is the reason to watch. The twins are greateye candy.
This was near the end for Hammer and one of Peter's last performances for the studio.
I recommend this movie to all peter Cushing fans as well as Hammer enthusiasts
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a top 3 for hammer with this one, 9 April 2011
By 
S. Cartlidge (uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
A great movie in my opinion only two films by hammer are better "the devil rides out"and "the gorgon" this movie is fast paced with plenty of atmosphere if you like witch burning and vampires this film is for you,a five star hammer horror!
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Twins Of Evil [1971] [DVD]
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