Customer Reviews


26 Reviews
5 star:
 (12)
4 star:
 (11)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a martial arts film,and all the better for it
Anyone expecting and wanting more Wu Xhia, in the vein of 'Hero' or 'Crouching Tiger' should look elsewhere, because while this has fighting and blood by the bucketful, it is not that sort of film at all,and distributors have done it no favours by trying to promote it on that basis.

In some ways it's more akin to a Sergio Leone Western made by Kurosawa, with...
Published on 12 Jun 2007 by KalteStern

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars The Warrior
Konnichiwa
Beautiful scenery, but the rest of it is boring and can't really see the 'warrior' explanitive.
If your a martial artist or enjoy action genere films.........avoid this.
Sayonara
Published on 23 July 2011 by Adam


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a martial arts film,and all the better for it, 12 Jun 2007
By 
KalteStern (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] [2001] (DVD)
Anyone expecting and wanting more Wu Xhia, in the vein of 'Hero' or 'Crouching Tiger' should look elsewhere, because while this has fighting and blood by the bucketful, it is not that sort of film at all,and distributors have done it no favours by trying to promote it on that basis.

In some ways it's more akin to a Sergio Leone Western made by Kurosawa, with its largely desert setting - by the time we reach the Clay Fort at the end it feels like the Alamo....although is technically Ming China.

Unlike more overtly genre pictures from Hong Kong, this Korean film actually has some great (if understated) acting, and a script that includes complex and sophisticated characters; there are no crude heroes and villains but a gradual development of the protagonists' motivation and character flaws.

Great photography, good script, but perhaps a bit long - but overall, well worth seeing
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars So much honour, 14 Jan 2007
By 
C. Leenhouwers "claireann82" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] [2001] (DVD)
The film follows a Korean peace delegation sent to make peace with the Ming dynasty. Unfortunately their plans are thwarted and they find themselves trudging across the desert desperate to make it home to Korea. They are led by the General who is a handsome young man who has a point to prove but in so doing gradually loses the respect of the men he is supposed to lead.

Amongst the group is a young slave who has a great sense of honour and is also a master with a spear. When they come across a group of Mongol warriors who have taken hostage the princess of the Ming dynasty, the Korean warriors steal her away in the belief that they will win favour with Ming. Both the General and the slave boy develop a thing for the princess who is played by Ziyi Zhang (is she the only Chinese actress in the world? She's in every Asian film!)

The Korean warriors go on the run from the Mongol warriors who want the princess back. Each of the main character's has to battle to discover the true sense of honour. The princess blames herself for causing so much trouble, the General wants to be the best warrior he can be and the slave wants to be free and find honour by doing the right thing. Unfortunately there is no love scene and there are only meangingful glances and unspoken words. The film leaves you feeling that everything was futile but then maybe that's the point. Once again a brilliant Asian film, although with the likes of 'Hero', 'House of Flying Daggers' and others, this is likely to be overlooked.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Epic!, 3 Dec 2006
By 
J. Faria (Bristol) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] [2001] (DVD)
This film is truly epic. It follows a small band of Korean warriors as they attempt to fight their way home, and along the way protect a chinese princess from an army of Mongol warriors.

This is another fine example of how Korean cinema is now leading the way in epic film-making (also see "Brotherhood"). This really is a boy's own adventure. Honourable warriors fighting against insurmountable odds, using only their fighting skills and cameraderie.

It reminded me of westerns like the Magnificent Seven and The Wild Bunch. In fact it owes a lot to Sam Peckinpah in the way the fight scenes are staged, particularly at the end.

The battle scenes stand out. They are brilliantly filmed and never tiresome or confusing.

The actors and dialogue are well above average for a martial arts film.I have no idea why this hasn't been widely released in cinemas, as were "Hero" and "House of Flying Daggers". This film is easily on a par with those, if not better. Less arty perhaps, but very entertaining. Personally I usually avoid martial arts films but I'd recommend this to anyone who likes their cinema to be high quality, entertaining and on a big scale. Why can't WE make films like this in the UK??
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too good for words, 15 Mar 2005
By 
C. D. Hough (Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Every once in a while a great director manages to produce a work of such unsurpassed greatness that it is destined to stand amongst the greats for all time. This is such a film.
The story is about a group of Koreans whose quest to return home from China is turned into an epic struggle for survival against overwhelming odds when they go to the aid of a Ming princess.
It differs from most asian action movies in two ways. The first is in the action. It is wonderfully filmed but in a realistic manner. None of the silly artsy wire work which seems to be so poupular these days.
The second is that the acting is exceptional. The characters are given both a sense of nobility and depth along with a flawed humanity.
In my opinion Kim Sung-su has proved himself to be as good as Kurosawa, if not better. It was quite rightly described as "the biggest motion-picture event in Korean cinema history."
This film was also released under the title "The warrior" but if you look for it under that name then be careful. There is another film by that name and it sucks. For some reason the reviews for both films of that name come up for both of them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderfully entertaining, 9 Feb 2010
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] (2001) (DVD)
This film is a fantastic piece of work. It is story of sin and the attempt at redemption, but does not spill over into European-like existential ponderings. It is a simple tale, full of atmosphere and depth, despite the minimal dialogue. The scenery compliments the plot in its simplicity and beauty. The acting and direction are superb. I only wish I could discuss the plot, but will not do so for fear of ruining your enjoyment of what is, undoubtedly, a uniquely original film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolute masterpiece, 17 Nov 2009
By 
Margus Lattik (Estonia, EU) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] (2001) (DVD)
The Warrior by a rather unknown Asif Kapadia is an absolute masterpiece of cinematography. Seemingly effortlessly, and almost wordlessly, it conveys a man's quest for redemption and for the understanding of life's essence. After turning his back on injustice killings and thus tragically losing his son, the Warrior takes on a pilgrimage to his homeland in the Himalayas. Though violent in a few scenes, it is generally very beautifully crafted (needless to say, it is not an action film). This film has been presented on DVD by the late Anthony Minghella and it does share similar visual scope and sensitivity. It is also good at recreating a picture of Indian desert town in the medieval times. Very highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eye of an Eagle and Stealth of a Lion, 2 Feb 2008
By 
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] [2001] (DVD)
The year is 1375 A.D. the Yuan and Ming dynasties are at war ... General Choi and his warriors arrive from Korea to help the Ming dynasties. They arrive in a city, are taken to a temple and ambushed. They are exiled to a desert where they are left to die ... The desert dunes contrast sharply with the authentic costumes of the soldiers ... The camera captures the naked beauty of the desert as the sun beats down on the weary and starving warriors ...

The warriors arrive at a camp on the side of a mountain where they are met with suspicion. They show their letter of passage. A Buddhist monk comes to their rescue and offers them food and drink. Their decision is to go to Xian Dao which is a 20 day journey and then return to Korea. On the long journey, an elderly Korean man when he is near death, releases his slave into freedom, telling everyone Yeosol is now a freeman. Mongolian soldiers attack the encampment and a bloody fight ensues ... While the Koreans were battle ready, amazingly, among them the former slave, Yeosol, proves himself to be an unusually skilled fighter. It is discovered the Mongolians of the Yuan dynasty have a royal prisoner, the Princess of the Ming dynasty. Undetected by her captors, she skillfully drops a handkerchief with a message written in blood which Yoso manages to retrieve. The Koreans see an opportunity to prove their worthiness to the Ming Dynasty. They create a distraction and capture the Princess. Yeosol demonstrates great heroism in his daring efforts to fight the Mongolians and save the Princess.

Primarily, the film is about how the Koryo (the group of Korean warriors) evade the Yuans or engage them in battle - all this on behalf of the royal prisoner whom they saved ... and among the Koryo, Yeosol proves to be a rare and most courageous fighter. There are realistic fight scenes which are well within the context of the film but may be too gruesome and gorry for some viewers. Yeosol, the freed slave proves invaluable to the Koreans. His fighting skills far exceed those of any other soldier among the Korean warriors. However, General Choi continues to view him as a slave by the Korean laws ... despite his Master having provided him freedom. The Koreans plan to get to a river which they will cross to get to Nanching. Unfortunately, the Mongolians thwart their efforts by killing nearly everyone in the villages which are located on the river. Surviving villagers join the Koreans as they march on thorugh forests to protect their lives from the invaders. They are awed by the fact they are protecting the Princess of the Ming dynsasty.

Sadly, the Mongolians continue to advance and battle with the diminishing group of survivors. The remaining villagers and Korean warriors make it to a river embankment where a Ming fortress becomes their shelter. Unfortunately, the Mongolians create a camp on a nearby hill top, planning an invasion. The courage of the villagers and Korean warriors in fighting the Mongolians is awe-inspiring ... It becomes a battle to the end.

The intersecting story line of three groups of warriors, the Ming, the Yuan, and the Koryo (Korean warriors) who fight to save the royal captor sounds like a simple story ... but it is not. There are complex subplots which are subtley revealed as the story unfolds before the viewer's eyes. There are hidden nuances and underlying depths - revealed by the camera. The camera captures short views of faces showing emotional depth and meaning, especially between Yeosol, the former slave and Princess, Bu-Yong. The camera hones in on fight scenes between individuals in a manner which makes the viewer feel as if they were actually there. The amazing capability of the Koreans to capture the Ming Princess and protect her is worth viewing. They march through unknown territory against a menacing enemy. The battle for life is revealed in unimaginable ways. The loyalty of the villagers and the dedication and perseverance of the Korean warriors ... is very inspiring. One learns so much about the human spirit and courage in a film like this. One also learns how hierarchy and politics affect the soldier and common man alike. At one point, the Princess was willing to give herself up to the enemy, the Mongolians, when she recognized how many lives were sacrificed on her behalf. She saw how many had died so she may be protected and live. It is quite a revelelation to discover how she was captured in the first place by the Yuans, the Mongolians. This is superbly filmed war epic which depicts extraordinairy cultural reality. It is most highly recommended. Erika Borsos [pepper flower]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Epic Quest, 26 Jun 2008
By 
Robert Anderson (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] [2001] (DVD)
In the late 14th century, when the Yuan Dynasty was fading and was quickly being replaced by the rising Ming Dynasty, there were plenty of intrigues afoot. One of which was a small envoy sent from Korea to present a gift of horses to Hongwu, the Ming emporer. No one knows what happened to the envoy as it was never seen or heard from again. This film is an imagining of what happened to them.

Enter Musa, a warrior. He is a slave who is set free when his owner (a member of the Korean peace delegation) dies. He helps the envoy battle through a fierce and inhospitable land as they struggle to make it back to their homeland. On the way they find Bu Yong, a princess of the Ming Dynasty, who was being held captive. They decide to try to curry favour with Hongwu by returning her back to the palace.

Musa (aka 'The Warrior') is a stunning piece of Korean cinema. It is beautiful and cinematic. The storyline is captivating, even if the characters are difficult to connect with in any real emotional way. The one thing that I found truly disappointing about this film is the complete under-utilisation of Ziyi Zhang (who starred in 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon' and 'House of Flying Daggers'). It is also very violent and bloody, so it's not for those who have squeamish stomachs. Nevertheless, I would still recommend watching this film if you ever get the chance.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A cinematic feast!, 4 Oct 2009
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] (2001) (DVD)
The Warrior is such a beautiful film. It is gripping from the very start with a relentless pace throughout. There are parts that leave you speechless and make you realise just how much power a good director has over it's willing audience. It is a simple story, set in an ancient time, within the backdrop of a mysterious eastern land. The actors are terrific. Superb casting. There is little dialogue but every word is amplified a hundred times by the photography, the subtle acting and direction.

I recommend this film to any film lover. It's not a 'crash-bang-wallop' movie, but it is a gentle, beautiful experience that is well worth the effort.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nothing less than 5 stars!, 2 Nov 2009
By 
Nobody "Knows" - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Warrior [DVD] [2001] (DVD)
Epic, just so good that after an hour you forget that you are reading sub titles, and the film just flows, unlike some other more hyped films of this type, the hero is not super human, merely highly skilled, and the fight and battle scenes are gritty and realistic. Korean and brilliant. I agree with another reviewer, why can't we make films like this!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Warrior [DVD] [2001]
The Warrior [DVD] [2001] by Kim Sung-Su (DVD - 2006)
£9.95
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews