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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'The Stones In The Park' a little flawed but essential viewing
'The Stones In The Park' film from 1969 has always been a firm favourite of mine despite the less than thrilling reviews it has received by the critics over the years. It's only really when compared with the 'Gimmie Shelter' soundtrack and the unreleased 'Ladies And Gentlemen ....' film that its shortcomings for me become most obvious. The Stones at this point had just...
Published on 1 April 2007 by Jervis

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Historic concert, poor performance and DVD
The '69 Hyde Park concert is historic for several reasons: it was the first one after Brian Jones death and the debut of Mick Taylor with the Stones, and over 250.000 fans assisted (some sources even talk about 500.000). However, it wasn't a good show: the band didn't play well, the guitars were out of tune and most songs were still taking shape. The Stones hadn't played...
Published on 7 Jun 2010 by Daniel R. Caruncho


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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'The Stones In The Park' a little flawed but essential viewing, 1 April 2007
By 
Jervis - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Rolling Stones - The Stones In The Park [1969] [DVD] (DVD)
'The Stones In The Park' film from 1969 has always been a firm favourite of mine despite the less than thrilling reviews it has received by the critics over the years. It's only really when compared with the 'Gimmie Shelter' soundtrack and the unreleased 'Ladies And Gentlemen ....' film that its shortcomings for me become most obvious. The Stones at this point had just recruited new member Mick Taylor who was making his debut with the band.

Generally, the band sound a little out of tune on a number of songs as they were perhaps a little rusty not having toured for for a while in addition to having their newest member making his first appearance. Actually Mick Taylor plays just fine for the most part.

While the Stones are not quite in their prime they do sound quite raw which seems an awful long way from their more polished and easily digestable sound of today. It's that raw energy that, for me, made the Stones special and it's also that reason why the Hyde Park show is infinitely superior to any concert footage released in later years.The eight songs which make up this film including 'Midnight Rambler', 'Satisfaction', 'I'm Free' and 'Sympathy For The Devil' are all highly enjoyable despite the fact that they would all improve no end by the time of the Stones U.S. tour towards the end of the year.

As any keen Stones fan knows the Hyde Park show was also turned into a tribute to Brian Jones who had died just two days earlier. Mick's reading from Shelley sounds rather quaint these days as does most of the rest of their performance (including Mick's dress). There was an aura and an authenticity about the Stones (and music in general those days) which was forever lost once corporate commercialism came into play in the eighties and consumerism became paramount.

In addition to the show there's brief interview footage with the band (although primarily Mick) and there are a few extras on this DVD version among which include the outtakes 'Mercy Mercy'.'Stray Cat Blues' and 'No Expectations' - all of which are perhaps not essential (despite some great slide guitar playing from Mick Taylor on the latter song).

All in all 'The Stones In The Park' may seem a little flawed but it's historic value is immense not just in terms of the Stones themselves but for musical/cultural history in general. For that i'd say it's an essential purchase.
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One Day in the Park, 15 Jun 2002
By 
D. C. Hociota (Sibiu, Romania) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
July 5-th 1969 history on the strings was made when the Rolling Stones performed a free concert in Hyde Park in front of half a million people. This concert criminally ignored on DVD since now is featured here, alas in a not so happy technical presentation. Provided with a mono soundtrack and with somehow bluish pictures, still this remains quite a feast for the fans. As Mick said at one moment " A concert is not just to hear the music as it really is that's for the studio to do..." those expected crystal clear strains and video sharp like pictures should search elsewhere. There are eight live songs: Midnight Rambler, Satisfaction, I'm Free, I'm Yours She's Mine, Jumping Jack Flash, Honky Tonk Woman, Love in Vain and Sympathy for the Devil. Although not all are at 451 Fahrenheit (Satisfaction is sadly one of the letdowns) still image and music combined are worth the money and the forbidden fruit Sympathy.... is sang with the help of an African band in an unforgettable Voodoo like ceremony. Hells Angels are also seen there but they are more like Mengele's Angels judging from their SS uniforms and insignias. In total opposition with their Californian cousins at Altamont Concert (a few months later) they were harmful here, their age and fashion style reminding more of the lost children of Mad Max III movie than Easy Rider.
Another surprise is Paul McCartney seen in the crowd for a couple of seconds during end credits. In all not being an ordinary concert but " In Memoriam " one (Brian Jones being found dead two days before, in his swimming pool) this DVD will revive history for those not so fortunate to live it then.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a very English afternoon, 4 Mar 2004
By 
Four and a half stars, really, for this very nice little film that's more a document of an event than of the concert that was the centerpeice of that event.
The sound is mono, which might bother some of you newfangled types, but it's fine with me. In _According to the Stones_ Keith Richards states that in terms of sound, this was one of their most abysmal shows ever. Which is a totally different issue than how well they're playing, mind you, but be aware that the sound on this dvd is pretty ... hm, authentic-sounding, shall we say. The groovy 60s-style camera "effects" get a little embarrassing a few times, and the camera's fixation with Mick Jagger is unfortunate - hello, there's a whole band at work up there, could we have some footage of them too please?!
But all in all it's a warm, charming and fascinating document of a very English afternoon that the Stones' free concert provided the excuse for, and of the Stones' gallant way of honouring Brian Jones.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Raw stones-Hot hippies, 14 Sep 2009
This review is from: The Rolling Stones - The Stones In The Park [1969] [DVD] (DVD)
I had this on VHS for years and years.
Its a favourite.While undoubtedly rusty,the stones exude an effortless hippy-cool and the music is raw and groovy.Often hilarious in places because it seems Jagger is almost doing an impression of someone doing an impression of him!!
I think the film gives a hint of just how enormous the Stones were at this point in their career,and this film is infinitely more watchable than the later stuff,when frankly,they'd all but lost it i feel.
Look out for the awesome Johnny Winter cover 'I'm Hers and She's Mine' that opens the gig to an accompaniement of half-dead butterflies being released to 500,000 punters.Really groovy stuff!
Song highlights?....erm..'Satisfaction','I'm Free' and 'Jumpin Jack Flash'.But also an interesting historical document regarding the Hippies and British Hells Angels.(Jagger would go on to make the fatal mistake of assuming that the American Angels would do a similar job of marshalling the infamous Altamont gig in California later in 1969,but thats another story on the 'Gimme Shelter DVD')
What the Stones MUST do is release 'Ladies And Gentlemen-The Rolling Stones' film of their 72 american tour!!Other than that,this DVD is as good as it gets for live stones on DVD.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Historic concert, poor performance and DVD, 7 Jun 2010
By 
Daniel R. Caruncho (Barcelona, Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The '69 Hyde Park concert is historic for several reasons: it was the first one after Brian Jones death and the debut of Mick Taylor with the Stones, and over 250.000 fans assisted (some sources even talk about 500.000). However, it wasn't a good show: the band didn't play well, the guitars were out of tune and most songs were still taking shape. The Stones hadn't played live for years, so the gig was a warm-up for the tour that was about to come (and excellently documented in The Rolling Stones - Gimme Shelter [DVD] [1970]).

The original set list of the Stones show was as follows:
1-Eulogy for Brian Jones (a Shelley poem read by Mick Jagger, in his infamous Marianne Faithfull dress)
2-I'm Yours, She's Mine (a raw rendition of the Johnny Winter number)
3- Jumpin Jack Flash
4- No Expectations
5- Mercy, Mercy
6- Stray Cat Blues
7- I'm Free
8- Down Home Girl
9- Love in Vain
10- Loving Cup (debut of a song that wouldn't be officially released until 1972)
11- Midnight Rambler
12- Satisfaction
13- Honky Tonk Woman
14- Street Fighting Man
15- Sympathy for the Devil (the highlight of the show)

The concert was filmed by Granada Television and shown in British television, and that footage is what you can find in this DVD. The film skips some songs and doesn't follows a chronological order. It includes the eulogy, 'Midnight Rambler', 'Satisfaction', 'I'm Free', 'I'm Yours', 'JJF', 'HTW', 'Love in Vain' and 'SFTD', and bits of an interview with Jagger.

The image is quite poor, very grainy, and there isn't any extra stuff worth of mention. For die hard fans only.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Beginning Of Their Peak Live Years, 16 Feb 2008
By 
Scottish Dave (Edinburgh, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Rolling Stones - The Stones In The Park [1969] [DVD] (DVD)
I've really enjoyed this film over the years and it's great to see it out on DVD with plenty of bonus material.

For me this was the beginning of their best live period with Mick Taylor now in the band. Late 60s/early 70s Stone rocked. This performance by them is quite raw, partly due to it being Taylor's first live appearance. Highlights include Love In Vain and the climax of Sympathy For The Devil (complete with African drummers).

This DVD releases come with lots of extras. The most interesting and relevant are 3 bonus tracks not originally featured in the film - Mercy Mercy, Stray Cat Blues and No Expectations. Unfortunately the latter two aren't complete.

I enjoyed this more than the Gimme Shelter movie mainly because of the vibe that surrounds the gig. This film still has the hippie ideal around it.

Maybe not essential viewing but if, like me, you love this period of the Stones then check it out!

8/10
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 25 year wait for this?, 3 April 2012
By 
Stephen Bieth (Mississauga/ Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Rolling Stones - The Stones In The Park [1969] [DVD] (DVD)
I have been looking for this film for at least the last 25 years. In that time it has never been released in North America so when I saw it was out in the rest of the world I couldn't get it fast enough. I had herd that the Stones did not play that well. That was a major understatement. They are horrible in this film. It sounds like they just got up on staged and winged it. Honky Tonk Woman sound like it is being played by someone who just picked up their first guitar and were shown how to play the beginning of the song. It is so slow it's painful. They have a group of African drummers with them during Sympathy For The Devil and I dont know if it's because the mix is so bad but there were parts in the song that did not sound anything like the original studio version or the live versions recorded later. Don't get me wrong I am very glad to have found the film. Historically in the halls of classic rock this is a very important film. Two days after Brian Jones funeral and the first show with Mick Taylor ( In case you don't know Brian Jones was fired from the Stones earlier and the concert was already a go before Brian died). But if you want to check out the Mick Taylor period of the Stones pick up the DVD/Blu ray of "Gimme Shetler" or "Ladies and Gentlemen the Rolling Stones" there is no question those are much better shows. But if you are a Stones fan especially if your a die hard this film is a must.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but flawed..., 25 Feb 2005
I was very tempted to rate this higher (and in some ways I feel I'm being a bit too 'picky') but this DVD does contain several notable flaws.
Ok, here goes:
Yes, it's great that this DVD is available to all the Rolling Stones fans out there and the price is certainly reasonable. My main 'beef' with it though is the fact that despite the packaging boasting about how the picture has been 'remastered' the quality (and I've watched this on several systems) is very poor - grainy; washed out...it's just drab. Actually, the same applies to the sound quality.
Secondly, there are no extras whatsoever which, I assume, relates to the bargain price but it would have been nice to contain at least something. Finally, this only contains about 70% of the actual set-list that the Stones played at Hyde Park. Some great songs are missing but, fortunately, what they've kept here is gold - especially 'Honky Tonk Woman' and 'I'm Free'. For the price and entertainment value I'd recommend this very, very highly for Stones fans but it's just a bit of a shoddy package all-round.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another World - Another Band, 14 Oct 2010
By 
This review is from: The Rolling Stones - The Stones In The Park [1969] [DVD] (DVD)
Its hard to imagine the globe straddling, money hoovering, rock and roll tourist attraction that is the Rolling Stones these days having any connection with this ragged bunch. But, here they are at the very dawn of the modern era of Rock touring just starting to find their feet again. Led Zeppelin had heralded this era and began the tradition that still stands today of one or two bands playing long sets instead of the old style package programmes which ten or so acts playing half an hour each.

The Rock business in Britain in the sixties was tiny. Bands all went to the same clubs, all knew each other socially and often played on each others recordings. This film (originally shot as a Granada TV documentary) evokes that spirit of how primitive the industry was. The huge crowd shots not withstanding this is a band playing through voxAC30's and Hi Watt Stacks on a make shift stage crammed with on lookers. The film, like "Gimme Shelter" should be viewed as more of an accurate document of the period rather than a faithful capturing of the band on stage. There are often out of synch moments and random crowd shots and some pretty wild zooming action which can be a bit irritating if you are trying to work out what chords Mick Taylor is playing but don't let that put you off.

Much more interesting for me is Mick's interview in the Rattan Chair looking stately in a creased shirt. Marianne Faithfull looking frail and transluscent in the Limo on the way to the gig. The empty and litter strewn streets of London's Kings Road. The low rise skyline of London in the sixties with hardly a skyscraper in sight. The hilarious un-menacing British Hell's Angels gangs. And how everyone appears to have Austin Power's teeth.

As for the band. Keith looks pallid and ill, his skin a curious grey. Bill Wyman is like a skeletal statue off to one side. Charlie Watts is unusually animated in his drumming especially during "Sympath for the Devil". Mick Taylor is already commanding in his soloing in this his first gig with the band. Jagger as ever is the only man who could pull off wearing a childs dress as a stage outfit and is forever the epitome of ugly beauty. The performances are not as bad this day as many make out but the band are pretty loose. I find that lack of tightness quite refreshing now, the Stones manage to conjure up a distinctive menacing vibe when they play. Soundwise it is pretty primitive, technical limitations in those days meant that Jagger had to sing into two mics taped together, one for the P.A and one for the recording. The stage is strewn with mic stands almost blocking the view of the band. But the overall effect is quite close to what it must have sounded like had you been anywhere near the stage. God alone know's what anyone could have heard further back.

Having watched this back to back with the Maysles' "Gimme Shelter" I do feel the latter film gives you more of an insight into people behind the myth, certainly Mick and Keith. This film interviews Mick but somehow fails to reveal anything about the band and the unique dynamic they had in those extraordinary years.

Check out [...] for more interesting stuff
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 7 July 2009
This is'nt just a film of the concert itself, but a whole documentary on what was going on. The songs are intersperced with short clips of the suroundings, interviews with the hell's angels, people who were there and of course the organisers and band memebers themselves.

All of this gives you a great feel for it, the next best thing to actuly being there.

I'd also like to say the camera work was amazing, and the editing certainly rises above the expected standard.

A must have for fans of the stones or even just fans of documentary. Being both, I loved every moment of it.
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