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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the best Slade album
In 1974 "pop artistes" were either single bands - Sweet, Suzi Quatro etc or album bands - Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield, Led Zep etc etc. Slade were one of the few who managed to sell singles and albums. Old New Borrowed and Blue was released in February 1974 just after they had sold a million of the single Merry Christmas Everybody. I doubt that anyone would have guessed it...
Published on 3 Oct. 2006 by Ian Hale

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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slade go pop instead of Rock.
Was this the album when Slade began to lose their fan base?
I was and still am a great Slade fan. I own all their recorded output from 1969-1991. Yet when this album was released in 1974 as a 14 year old I remember being quite disappointed with it. After Slayed which rocked, to me this was just pop. Saying all that the album has grown on me during the years. But I...
Published on 30 Mar. 2002 by Mr. Alan J. Needs


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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the best Slade album, 3 Oct. 2006
By 
Ian Hale (Nottingham UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Old New Borrowed & Blue (Audio CD)
In 1974 "pop artistes" were either single bands - Sweet, Suzi Quatro etc or album bands - Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield, Led Zep etc etc. Slade were one of the few who managed to sell singles and albums. Old New Borrowed and Blue was released in February 1974 just after they had sold a million of the single Merry Christmas Everybody. I doubt that anyone would have guessed it at the time but Old New Borrowed and Blue was to be their last UK number one - whether album or single.

There is no doubt that it showed a greater maturity in song writing and arrangement and less of their stomping trademark. To my mind that is what makes it as an album. My personal favourite is "Miles out to Sea" - very Beatley and summery and maybe a better choice for the summer single than Banging Man turned out to be. Here you get Banging Man as a bonus track so you can take your pick.

This album has the variety of muscial style of most of the later Beatles albums which is what in my view makes it their best. Sadly though as Slade matured their record buying fans gave up on them. The Slade in Flame film would be out at the end of the year and Slade would have their last top three hit for nearly a decade but until the early eighties it was all downhill chartwise from now on.

Listen to and enjoy Slade's last number one. It is certainly worth £6.99.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite Slade albums, 19 Feb. 2007
This review is from: Old New Borrowed & Blue (Audio CD)
Slade went through a period of churning out classic songs, which were sensitive, melodic and boot-stomping all at the same time.

Manager Chas Chandler pushed them into songwriting in the late sixties, and by the time of this LP, James Lea and Noddy Holder seemed to have found their feet. In my opinion, Slade were at their peak around 1974 in terms of the depth and beauty of their songs, which, complimented by Chas's down to earth production and the gimmick of the glamour and the songname mis-spelling, just fitted the time right at shifted albums by the bucketload.

A good song is always a good song no matter how much fashions change, and there are plenty to enjoy and love on this album.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More Subtle Slade!!??!!, 1 Sept. 2006
By 
Geoffrey Lake "banginman" (Shropshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Old New Borrowed & Blue (Audio CD)
This album saw a new approach for the band. It saw Slade heading for a more subtle approach. It was only a matter of time before they would broaden their horizons. After the last release (Slayed) and the live offering 'Slade Alive' it was time for some serious adult songwriting. Please understand, the rockers are still there. 'We're Really Gonna Raise the Roof', 'My Town' and the very loud voice shredding 'Don't Blame Me' will keep the most ardent Slade fans happy. However, ballads like the breath taking 'Everyday', the country feeling 'How Can It Be', keyboard driven tracks like 'My Friend Stan' and bassist Jim Lea singing lead vocal for the first time (When The Lights Are Out) saw the band heading into a new experimental phase. The title of the album referred to the fact the album contained 'new' songs (at the time), 'old' songs (like the single My Friend Stan etc) 'borrowed' (a' cover of the Undertakers Just a Little Bit') and 'blue' (lyrics) songs like Good Time Gals.
Added are bonus tracks that include the single The Bangin'Man and the B-Sides 'I'm Mee, I'm Now and That's Orl', 'She Did It To Me' and the superb 'Kill'Em at The Hot Club Tonight'. As on the Slayed remaster a flexi disc track is included where Slade talk to '19' readers (another young girls magazine). The last track is taken from the flexi so it is not great quality but good fun and it is on the end of the CD so can be avoided.
So the important question is the remastering any good. Well the answer is this, like the remastered Slayed CD it is indeed a superb job. The CD sounds so crisp. The remastering done by Tim Turan is 2nd to none. You can hear so much more than before and yet the superb production quality of the late Chas Chandler is still there. The added tracks push the playing time up to 57.42. A new booklet containing many unseen pictures of the band, picture sleeves from around the world and comments from the band. What more can you want?
So what are you waiting for? Buy it and start feeling the noize again.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Slade - Old, New, Borrowed & Blue, 25 Aug. 2006
By 
David J. KEMP (Huntingdon, Cambs) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Old New Borrowed & Blue (Audio CD)
THis is a good re-master. About time Slade! Also, the new packaging is excellent. It's very well done - and some time and effort has gone into it.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slade go pop instead of Rock., 30 Mar. 2002
Was this the album when Slade began to lose their fan base?
I was and still am a great Slade fan. I own all their recorded output from 1969-1991. Yet when this album was released in 1974 as a 14 year old I remember being quite disappointed with it. After Slayed which rocked, to me this was just pop. Saying all that the album has grown on me during the years. But I wonder after having had 3 consequtive No1 albums was it because of this release that their follow up album Slade In Flame only made No6 the same year?
So what about the album? The stand out tracks for me are
Everyday which is one of Slades all time classic songs, has Noddy Holder ever recored a better vocal?
Do We Still Do It. A great Rocker.
My Friend Stan. A No2 hit single in 1973. Finally
How Can It Be. Which has a great chorus.
As for the rest of the album I hate to say it, but it sounded a bit like filler to me at the time. I always remember my sister who at the time was a 12 year old Donny Osmond fan and hated all things Slade liking Find Yourself A Rainbow. What more is there to say?
As I said earlier, over the years this album has grown on me, but these are the thoughts I had at the time. 4 stars for anybody else. But for SLADE only 3 stars.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New direction, brave direction, 16 Oct. 2010
By 
Colin Smith (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Old New Borrowed & Blue (Audio CD)
Up until the release of this album, Slade could possibly be described as a one-dimensional rock band, mostly focused on producing foot stomping rockers. Like another reviewer here I was 14 years old when this album was released, and a big Slade fan at the time, but fortunately I did not experience any disappointment. This release saw new avenues explored, although this move was unpopular with many Slade fans, this was a brave change of direction for the band, even so, the "old" Slade is well represented here, with tracks such as "My Town" and "We're really gonna raise the roof". The track "When the lights are out" has a little bit of a Beatles feel to it, with Noddy Holder stepping aside from lead vocals to allow Jimmy Lea to take centre stage, his voice adds a new dimension to the bands sound. "How can it be" is a foot-tapping country music inflected song, the famous ballad "Everyday" was also another pleasant surprise, showing an emotional, tender side to the band. "Find yourself a rainbow" and "My friend stan" must have felt like a brave step to take at the time. This was an interesting change of direction from Slade, a change that continued to be explored on the album "Flame". 3 of the 5 bonus tracks include the unusual "Kill em at the hot club tonite" and the hit single "The Bangin man" and its flipside "She did it to me" - my favourite Slade track. This is an excellent album. A wise buy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Quite simply brilliant, I never tire of this little beauty, 12 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: Old New Borrowed & Blue (Audio CD)
Ths album that got me into Slade!!! Quite simply brilliant, I never tire of this little beauty, Slade were "growing up" experimenting and developing their musical depth. Still possesing the hard edge with songs like" just want a little bit", My Town to the more flambouyant "find yourself a rainbow" " miles out to sea" which sees Jim Lea on vocals.
Brilliant album from a brilliant band. You will not be dissapointed!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great 40th Birthday present, 15 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: Old New Borrowed & Blue (Audio CD)
Found out this was the No1 album the week a friend was born back in 1974 - and he is a rock fan too - think they liked it.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hooray!, 1 Sept. 2006
This review is from: Old New Borrowed & Blue (Audio CD)
It's terrific to be able to get this album on CD after so long - the packaging is good and the bonus tracks are a real, er, bonus!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Seventies rockers, Slade, begin to mellow, 15 Nov. 2000
By A Customer
Known in the US as Stomp Your Hands Clap Your Feet, Old New Borrowed & Blue was Slade's 3rd consecutive UK No.1 LP.
Released in Britain in March 1974, this album showed a maturity in both Noddy Holder & Jim Lea's songwriting, and Manager Chas Chandler's production of their material.
Containing Slade's first ever ballad, Everyday, which reached UK No.3 upon it's single release, ONB&B is an album which many heralded as a turning point for Slade. Whilst their energetic and exhilarating live shows were slaying audiences around Europe & Australasia, the band had reached a point where their ability to pen a tune was being compared (favourably) by the UK music press, with The Beatles.
Highlights being the quirky My Friend Stan ( a UK No.2), along with Everyday, and the out and out pop of When The Lights Are Out, ONB&B shows a side of Slade not previously seen - or heard - and whilst on several tracks they still make a fair share of "noize", (ie; We're Really Gonna Raise The Roof, Just A Little Bit, and Good Time Gals), it's apparent to all that these boys are indeed growing up! 4 stars. Kym Jones
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