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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Shock to the heart but Vinnie's not to blame., 15 April 2011
By 
Spike Owen "John Rouse Merriott Chard" (Birmingham, England.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Shock [1946] [DVD] (DVD)
Janet Stewert, whilst waiting to meet her returning from World War II husband, Paul, witnesses a murder. Stricken with shock, Janet is hospitalised and placed in the care of of noted psychiatrist Dr. Cross. Trouble is, is that it was Dr. Cross who committed the murder!.

Vincent Price (Dr. Cross) was of course synonymous with the horror genre. A real classy actor whose ability sometimes gets forgotten due to his participation in the murder death kill part of cinematic lore. Here in this low level B movie we find Price the sole reason for sitting thru the picture to the end. For although the premise is as solid as it gets, and the setting is ripe for dark deed like shenanigans, Shock is immeasurably dull. Director Alfred L. Werker and his screenplay writer Eugene Ling, adapt Albert DeMond's story with the clear intention of crafting a potboiler. But sadly, in spite of Price's efforts, they forgot to turn the heat up! Full of drawn out musings that get repeated throughout, the film also feels like it's going round in circles. It's tolerable in the main because the story at least has the viewer intrigued as to the outcome, but come the tepid finale one is left with a feeling of being cheated out of a promised ignition of fuel. As for the rest of the cast,? Lynn Bari gives the only other performance of note, but it's a by the bye character and nothing for her to get her teeth into. While a couple of moody scenes at the sanitarium do at least perk up the plodding story, particularly one during a thunder storm. But they are but mere false dawns.

Thankfully only running at 70 minutes, Shock doesn't take too much out of ones life. But really it's one for Vincent Price completists only, and ultimately the film stands as a very wasted opportunity. 4/10
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This may be a plodding B noir, but it has the terrific queen of the B's, Lynn Bari, 20 Feb. 2009
By 
C. O. DeRiemer (San Antonio, Texas, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Shock [DVD] [1946] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
What is there about cheap B-movie noirs from the Forties that make them so perfect a way to waste a couple of hours? For the most part, there's usually just adequate acting, deadly serious detectives, obvious music scores and plodding direction. My guess is that it's the comfort of the predictable, the efficient style (Shock takes only 70 minutes and was shot in 19 days), the black-and-white noir look achieved with lots of night scenes and odd dark shadows, the undemanding plots and, of course, the murders. It helps, too, if you're on the brink of doddering old age and can remember watching some of them in your neighborhood movie house.

In Shock, young wife Janet Stewart (Anabel Shaw) arrives at the Belmont Arms Hotel in San Francisco to meet her soldier husband, Lt. Paul Stewart (Frank Latimore). He's coming home after two years as a prisoner of war. There's a mix-up with her reservation and then her husband doesn't arrive. The hotel manager let's her stay overnight in a suite, and there she not only has a nightmare but, looking out the window into the adjoining suite, she witnesses a man use a heavy candlestick to crush his wife's skull. When her husband arrives the next morning, he finds her in a catatonic state of shock. And guess which psychiatrist who has a suite in the hotel is called upon to examine her. (No spoilers here. All is known in the first six minutes.) Yes, it's Dr. Richard Cross (Vincent Price)...the man who is the murderer.

It's not long before Dr. Cross has convinced Lt. Stewart to let him care for his wife at his private sanatorium. Death may be one of the therapies he prescribes for her. Egging him on is his lover, nurse Elaine Jordan (Lynn Bari), a woman who sees nothing especially wrong with mixing up injections, turning a deranged patient on to young Janet, overdosing Janet with insulin as part of shock therapy or just having her committed to an insane asylum for life. Nurse Jordan must have missed the class on do no harm.

Let's face it, Shock is plodding but it has three advantages. First, as noted, is the comfort of the predictable. We're a step ahead of the writer and director all of the time. Even the half-hearted twist gives us a quiet smile of superiority. Outguessing journeymen directors may not seem like much, but it's better than napping. Second, the movie has a nice noir look. There's a nifty nightmare scene, some terrific shadows and a scary night scene with that deranged patent creeping around the sanatorium.

Last...and first...is Lynn Bari. She was a first-class actor who never was able to break into A-movie lead roles. Bari was versatile and believable. She was sexy, all right, and could be warm, scheming, supportive, destructive, noble, vicious, friendly, you name it. She was queen of the Bs. Just look at her here as a scheming nurse, and then look at her in two other movies from 1946. In Nocturne she pairs with George Raft and is amusing and desirable. In Home Sweet Homicide, she's the mother of three kids and a mystery writer. Bari makes a great mom as well as a great love interest for a bachelor police detective. Not least, Bari had one of the sexiest speaking voices in the movies. I'd put her photo in my wallet any day.

Shock looks just fine. There are no extras except an audio commentary I didn't listen to by a man named John Stanley.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish from Elstree DVD, 20 Nov. 2010
By 
John Moore "John Moore" (Dorset. England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Shock [1946] [DVD] (DVD)
I am a fan of Vincent Price and never seen or heard of this film I brought it. however, the dvd is released by Elstree DVD. the picture quality is poor and the sound awful. the film looks like it has been recorded from a video tape onto a dvd disc. cheap lousy output. I have had other dvds by Elstree in the past and they are the same poor output and cheap lousy dvd's I just thought that by now Elstree would of brought good out by now quality dvds avoid anything by Elstree DVD. I understand you can get this film from America (region 1) and it is released by 20th century fox. at least if, you have a multi-regional dvd player you no doubt will get a good dvd more better then the crap Elstree dvd put out.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Damn meddling husband, 4 Feb. 2012
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This review is from: Shock [1946] [DVD] (DVD)
Anabel Shaw (Janet) gets thrown into some kind of zombie-like state after witnessing a murder. She is transferred to Vincent Price's (Dr Cross) psychiatric institution to 'recover' only recovery for her is the last thing on Price's mind. Both he and nurse Lynn Bari (Elaine) have been conducting an affair and the murder that Shaw witnessed was Price murdering his wife. And Price knows that she saw. Bari isn't too keen on having this witness around either. The film follows their attempts to prevent Shaw from telling the truth. They need to keep her sedated ....... or worse....

The film starts interestingly enough as we follow a spooky dream sequence and witness the murder through the eyes of Anabel Shaw while she waits for her husband in a hotel room. Unfortunately, we then get a dumb contrast as we are asked to believe that Shaw becomes rendered permanently speechless and wide-eyed as a result. It's laughable. All credibility and sympathy that we may have had for her character is thrown out of the window as she demonstrates an incredibly soppy, weak personality. It's also a bit of an insult to viewers considering the time of war and the atrocities that people would have had to see on a daily basis. Yet this pathetic figure can't handle someone being knocked on the head. Honestly! Just for that, I watched the film urging both Price and Bari to finish her off and hopefully get away with it. Go on Price and Bari, do what you gotta do...!!...

It's an OK film that never quite gathers momentum but Vincent Price and Lynn Bari are strong enough to carry the proceedings through to a rather messy and rushed finale.
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