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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'THE STORY OF 'POCAHONTAS'
The story 'Disney' brought back to life in the cartoon version inspiring
youngsters all over the world, became adapted as it's historical tale
in 2006 by director 'Terence Malick'
It tells of the English mission of exploration arrivingon the coastline the
visitors called 'Virginia' in the early 17th century.
The 'Naturals' watch on as the...
Published 4 months ago by rbmusicman

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Mallek's weakest film?
There is a lot of style in this production,but just like the outward appearance of a person, if there is no substance you are left feeling you have just witnessed an empty shell.

Thats how I feel about this film;plenty of wistful scenes of water,trees and landscape and of the Indian tribe going about their daily business;the monologues between Farrell(with a...
Published 8 months ago by robert stirling


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'THE STORY OF 'POCAHONTAS', 9 Mar 2014
By 
rbmusicman (U.K) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The story 'Disney' brought back to life in the cartoon version inspiring
youngsters all over the world, became adapted as it's historical tale
in 2006 by director 'Terence Malick'
It tells of the English mission of exploration arrivingon the coastline the
visitors called 'Virginia' in the early 17th century.
The 'Naturals' watch on as the strangers led by 'Captain Newport'
(Christopher Plummer) drop anchor and come ashore.
'John Smith' who had been accused of mutinous talk is spared from
hanging by the Captain.
It is decided that they will build a settlement with the initial intention of
building a trust between them and the Naturals.
When the Captain sets sail to collect supplies for the new-world
settlement 'John Smith' (Colin Farrell) is left in command.
On a discovery mission up river 'John' is held by the natives, he
lives among them for some considerable time, he try's to understand
their culture, whilst becoming closer and closer to the 'King' (Chief's)
young daughter 'Pocahontas' (Q'orianka Kilcher)
When the naturals return 'John' back to his own people he finds they
are near to starving and riddled with disease.
The trust between the Naturals and the settlers deteriorates leading
to bloody conflict.
The romance between 'John' and 'Pocahontas' still simmers leading
to the young princess being disowned by her father.
Later on, 'Pocahontas' is told that 'John' had died, now the young
princess finds herself alone among people that are strange, she
slides into depression, but attracts the attention of a new settler 'John
Rolfe' (Christian Bale)
As history tells us, 'Pocahontas' travels to England to live.
The film had mixed reviews when released in the U.K.
(I haven't watched it for some considerable time, previously having
watched the 'theatrical' version on DVD )
I have owned the Blu-ray extended version for some time watching it
for the first time now. (Extended Version 171 minutes)
The story is of love, suspicion, and mistrust.
The beginning in truth of the true occupants of America losing their lands.
It's actually a very good film.
The picture and sound quality -Excellent.
Features include -
* Behind the Story.
* Making the New World.
* Comprehensive 10 part documentary.
* Theatrical Trailers.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Mallek's weakest film?, 15 Nov 2013
By 
This review is from: The New World [DVD] (DVD)
There is a lot of style in this production,but just like the outward appearance of a person, if there is no substance you are left feeling you have just witnessed an empty shell.

Thats how I feel about this film;plenty of wistful scenes of water,trees and landscape and of the Indian tribe going about their daily business;the monologues between Farrell(with a barely comprehendable Irish accent)and Qorianka Kilcher(who appears to learn English in a few weeks and speaks perfectly without a hint of an accent) I found boring.

Unlike Mallik's masterpiece The Thin Red Line [1999] [DVD] which has style but is full of plot and action to back it up,this was sleep inducing and dragged for much of its length in my view.

Disappointing for me,but we all have different tastes.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly slight and insubstantial, 21 Oct 2006
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The New World [DVD] (DVD)
The New World is the least of Terrence Malick's limited filmography to date, and could be best described as a monotone poem. It's not exactly bad, just mundane and rather forgettable even while you're watching it, more of a self-indulgence than a genuine attempt to communicate with an audience. Visually it often seems surprisingly flat and uninspired, while the script comprises of far too many trite voice over questions s-p-o-k-e-n...v-e-r-y...s-l-o-w-l-y...i-n...h-u-s-h-e-d...t-o-n-e-s against selections from his classical music collection, which doesn't magically render them profound but simply makes the film evenly paced to the point where nothing can stand out: even the battle sequence takes time out for more musings. Another big problem is the miscasting of the inexplicably prolific Colin Farrell, a nice enough lad offscreen I'm sure but an extraordinarily limited actor who just cannot carry a picture no matter how many chances he's given. True to form he trots out his two `important picture' expressions - the Bambi-caught-in-the-headlights-of-an-oncoming-car one and the one he thinks looks serious but simply makes him look like he's not been getting enough roughage in his diet. The fact that he's outshone by Q'orianka Kilcher in her first speaking part speaks volumes of his inadequacy, although to be fair he has been worse. Indeed, among the male leads Christian Bale does much, much more with much, much less in the last third of the film, as does a typically underused Christopher Plummer in the first third.

Malick is very good at the madness and mutiny that infects the deluded settlers of Jamestown, but because it happens to people we've barely been introduced to it carries no emotional or dramatic weight. If anything, it just made me think of how much more Herzog could have made of it all. Moments work, most notably the expulsion of the `Naturals' from their land, but on the evidence of the 135-minute version I very much doubt Malick's promised longer cut will solve the problems. I know it's meant to be a work of art, but I just came away with the feeling that I'd watched an old and very average Universal International 50s Western redubbed by first-year philosophy students. The only surprise was that Jeff Chandler and his bouncing Basques didn't crop up.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great but unexpected film, 22 Nov 2006
By 
T. R. Alexander (East Anglia, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The New World [DVD] (DVD)
When I watched this film I was expecting something of an action adventure film but instead this film is quite a tender lover story, and is probably a better film because of it. Based around the true story of the first European colonists of America and there interactions with the native peoples the film concentrates on the love that develops between Captain John Smith and Pocahontas. Colin Farrell and Christopher Plummer are great in their respective parts but I do feel that Christian Bale, despite giving a great performance, is wasted in the part that he had. The star of the film though is most defiantly Q'orianka Kilcher playing the Native American princess Pocahontas. The film has been beautifully shot and although I cannot comment on its historical accuracy The New World is definitely worth watching.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Amazingly un-historical, 27 Oct 2012
By 
This version has many positive points indeed. For one the Indians are real Indians. For two the Indian life style is a lot more realistic than in most other versions and what happens in the films is more credible than in most other versions. It is highly probably that the Indians were a lot more hostile than thought as soon as they understood the English were going and planning to stay, and thus Smith had lied to them and promised their departure whereas he knew it was a lie.

The other side is just as realistic. The English die like flies the first year of diseases, cold and hunger, and also because of the Indians but this vision of the English is also realistic in the extreme violence they were confronted to and the extreme violence they submitted the Indians to. The Indians tried to overwhelm them with numbers but the English just burnt the villages and killed everyone, burnt the harvests and the crops forcing the Indians to go away or starve before being exterminated. The film is even clear about the intention of pushing the Indians away from the very start.

But apart from that realistic dimension of the film, the story itself is an embellished love story that has little to do with what probably really happened. Pocahontas was ten when Smith appeared and not a grown young woman. Her religious position and training is not at all explicated and thus the Indian culture is not at all exploited as a highly spiritual culture. It is reduced to some kind of ritualistic, superstitious, extremely "primitive" behavior and relishing paint and other body adornments. All testimonies show clearly that the Indian civilization was a highly advanced one in the field of mental and spiritual empathy with other people and with the other side of reality, the supernatural side that more or less dictates its energetic lead to this world.

But the worst part is the erasing of the real chronology and the role of Argall in the game. The abduction is supposedly coming after the "father" of Pocahontas had banned her from the tribe into exile into another tribe of the Powhatan alliance. That erases the Indian husband Pocahontas had, and her Indian son. That erases the abduction, the killing of her Indian husband and the escape of her Indian son who had been moved to some relatives when the Indians realized Pocahontas was being fooled into abduction. That also more or less makes the abduction easier: she believes she is being saved from exile by her Captain Smith.

The fable of Smith being saved by her is of course central though this is only in the second version of the event that Smith gave in 1624, two years after the bloody upheaval of the Indians, which had an obvious impact on the whole testimony on the colony up to 1622. In his first account of 1608 there is nothing about his life being menaced and it being saved then by Pocahontas. The love affair is of course justified by that salvation.

Then the marriage with John Rolfe is hyper-unrealistic. During her abduction she was raped. She gave birth to her mixed-blood son before being married to John Rolfe and that son, strangely enough is named after the governor of the Colony, Sir Thomas Dale, who had had access to her during her captivity, and even worse, John Rolfe, the secretary of the colony, did not register his "own" son on the books of the colony, showing that either the boy was not his son and he did not care registering him, or that he was considered as a non-entity because he was a mixed-blood, revealing the basic racism of the English towards the Indians and the clear anti-Indian policy of the Church of England. All that is just forgotten in the film.

The final untruth is of course about her death. The film forgets to tell us the captain of the trip to England and back to America was Argall, the captain who abducted her, and the film pretends she knew before going to London that Smith was not dead, and hence had lied to her and to the Powhatan alliance. That makes the death easy and the hypothesis of her being poisoned is nicely evacuated. At the same time what happens to her son is not that clear.

The last element that is absolutely unacceptable is the music that has nothing to do with the historical period and the Indian context of many scenes. No Indian music and in England we have piano music as if the piano already existed in the early 16th century.

So it is interesting to see the film because of its realism but it is highly un-historical if not anti-historical. Could have done better with a little help from simple historical research. Real history is just as entertaining as ideological biased story-telling.

Dr Jacques COULARDEAU
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I challenge you not to be moved by this..., 29 May 2011
This review is from: The New World [DVD] (DVD)
What a devastatingly beautiful piece of cinema. Malick has engineered a spiritual high of gargantuan porportions. I don't know where to begin discussing this film, as any criticism seems superfluous. Just as another critic has written, after the film I felt I had had a mystical experience, or had just listened to a mass by Bach. I was overwhelmed with a truly ambivalent mix of emotions. It is a meditation on life, love and death. Just as in Malick's Thin Red Line, the context of the film, after having witnessed it in its entirety, seems irrelavent; here he has chosen the time of colonisation. Despite this, the details and costumes and production design are superb. It is nature, who is the star of this show, however. Malick has captured some divine images.

The female protagonist seems to represent innocence. Malick is asking us to renew our vision of the world. Again, the device of blessed nature, interrupted and destroyed by man is used as a vehicle for the story; and like previous films, this one includes some incredible imagery; maybe some of Malick's finest. A visionary product of genius? Perhaps..

Even though Farell is one half of the main character for the majority of the film, his performance is the weakest, and although it is not bad acting it is too lackadaisical to build up the character well (Bale, who settles for a minimalist approach, could have done better as well), with Q'Orianka Kilcher and Plumber stealing the show on that front. But, in a film which explores man's spirituality on such an ambitious scale, such ideas seem pale. Of course, the music and photography here are top notch.

What matters here is that Malick has achieved, by a synthesis of sound and vision, what the great painters and composers have: the transference of the most deeply felt, poignant and moving emotions a human is capable of. By presenting images of beauty and then the destruction of that beauty, Malick has realised - in the very highest terms - the preciousness of life and its conflicts. Some of the scenes are so filled with wonder at life, a return to that priceless innocence of youth, that many viewers must be moved to tears. There is a primordal longing captured here which speaks to the humanity in all of us. Malick has so carefully chosen his images that they could pierce a heart made of stone; I would not say he manipulates his audience's emotions, but we feel prey to them, much like a puppet on a string, with the film's more moving scenes tugging at them readily. Evidently, just as a symphony takes us through a gamut of contrasts, so too does this film.

Interestingly, some have seen this film as Malick's wish-fulfilment or as some sort of biopic, which is not unreasonable. Clawing back what was lost is a central idea in Malick's movies, and this is no different.The use of music is also superb, with a very cleverly-employed concerto (no. 23) by Mozart which enhances the more dramatic scenes of love. [The idea that Bach's music seeks to neutralise human time and bring about the eternal, ie the time of god; whereas Mozart's seeks to unravel time, allowing man to take hold of his destinty is here especially pertinent. This film is based in a time when the tipping point of the Enlightenment was in crescendo.]

This is Malick's statement of free-will. The film presents us with the men who feel ambivalent about taking hold of this opportunity. Ensuing chaos is the result. It is slow in places but this too is a minor criticism for impatient viewers; the action scenes benefit enormoulsy from this juxtaposition, as they explode into action with true violence. And, indeed, it is certainly a film you feel more than anything else. If you do not see it explicitly on the screen, you feel it in your gut. The layers of subtly at work are astounding.

The critical and public reception of this film was mixed, but let us remember, Malick is not here to provide slapdash entertainment; this is art to make you think! If you are looking for back to back action, go see Apocalypto! If you approach the film with less-fixed expectations of what a period film is supposed to be, you will be better off for it. A glorious cinematic achievement which is essentially a eulogy. Be patient and you will be rewarded with a journey, an oddesy, like no other. I challenge you not to be moved by this...

People compare Malick to Kubrick, but he is in a league of his own. Has there ever been a more generous filmmaker?? I speak in terms of quality, surely not quantity!! The closest I can get to a conclusion about this film is Platonic: just as the two [initial] leads share a tender, platonic love, so too do we experience what Plato thought life was: a remembering. We return to the roots of the cosmos. We should just be grateful that Malick has chosen cinema as his language, because he is a poet of extraordinary talent, and the panache of this production proves it. Perfect? No. Ahead of its time? Certainly. A remarkable work.

[This film has more in common with Days of Heaven than might be expected, and the scenes in the field with the two leads immediately brought back to mind Gere and Adams. Also, the fatal love triangle idea is also used here but in a different way]
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Special Movie., 14 July 2012
By 
Peter Vizor "Rootsman" (Bristol,England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Please do not listen to some of the negative reviews of this movie. I purchased the 'Extended Cut' and this contained nearly 3 hours of footage. Having researched the authenticity of the content I was overjoyed that the film was loyal to the story. The main reason for writing this review is to document the accuracy of the love content. To anyone who has loved and lost (and loved again) the emotions span the centuries and the Director has shown a masterclass in extracting this from his cast. Miss Kiltcher in particular is outstanding and I loved the way Colin Farrell showed his sensitive side. Try it and make your own mind up.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile extension to a masterpiece (Extended Cut Review), 4 July 2012
By 
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This is specifically a review of the Extended Cut in relation to the original cut, for those who are wondering wether the extension is worthwhile or not, as i did before purchasing. I had seen the original cut a couple of times and come to the conclusion that it was one of the most beautiful films I had ever experienced, and one of my favourites of the films in general, a genuine masterpiece. I was unsure what the extension would add, wether it would actually improve the film or perhaps even diminish it but I definitely wanted to see for myself. After watching it i can say that if you are a fan of the original cut, it is definitely worth buying, if you are not, leave this place.
I was surprised by just how substantial the new material was, and how seamlessly it was integrated. The extension to the film is not just a few extra scenes spliced in here and there but a restructuring of the film itself incorporating new elements and replacing old ones in a way that flowed quite naturally, the whole thing had more detail, more depth. It would be uneccessary for me to try and list all the additions, but highlights for me were extensions to the scenes of Smith living with the natives that made the whole sequence even more mesmerising, giving greater insight into their daily lives, and extensions and additions to the relationship of Smith and 'Pocahontas' that gave their story deeper impact and involvement.
As a great fan of Terrence Malick's film making in general, I'd relish any opportunity to see more of his work, and so this was in the end an unmissable purchase for me. If you too are a fan and want more, I'd definitely recommend it, if you haven't seen either cut of the film before, I think i might suggest watching the original first to see if you want to go deeper. If you are not a fan, why are you still here? I thought I instructed you to leave.
Anyway, where's that 6 hour cut of The Tree of Life?
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2.0 out of 5 stars Bored by new Eden, 14 July 2014
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As others have said this is an art film. Lovely photography, great settings, realism etc but it is very slow and the love story (both for the native woman and the new Eden) does not convince, and that's mainly down to Colin Farrell who gives the overwhelming impression he does not want to be there.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Terrence Malick is an unusual writer/producer/director. He come to ..., 29 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The New World [DVD] (DVD)
Terrence Malick is an unusual writer/producer/director. He come to matter mundane in a very oblique way and remains unforgettable.. It is worth getting to grips with his way of film making for the effort might just change your life.
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The New World [DVD]
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