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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fine interpretation of Mahler's Cinderella Symphony., 3 July 2006
By 
Steve (Leeds) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Mahler: Symphony No.7 [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
Well the Seventh used to be the Cinderella of Mahler's symphonic output. There used to be few performances and recordings, and even now some critics can be very sniffy about this work. I am delighted this excellent performance under Abbado has made it to DVD. I thoroughly agree with the American reviewer who finds this a great and under-rated work.

And of course Abbado has the Lucerne Festival Orchestra; a group made up of some of the finest musicians from across Europe (just one example-the principal clarinetist is Sabine Meyer no less). Sometimes when orchestras are formed in this way, they don't gel; well in this case they play as though they had been a team for years. Absolutely cracking playing. And it is good to see the instrumentalists and their instruments, in this, one of the most strangely orchestrated of works even by Mahler's standards. See the bass drum thrashed with ?birch sticks. See the tiny mandolin. And the giant bass bassoon. It's all great fun and enormously enjoyable.

I tried listening in surround sound (Dolby and D.T.S.) but I actually preferred plain stereo. The picture quality is superb- virtually broadcast standard. If I have one criticism it is that there are no extras. But this remains an outstanding Mahler DVD and I highly recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This recording underpins Abbado's reputation as a leading exponent of this work, 11 Nov 2011
By 
I. Giles (Argyll, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Abbado has the enviable reputation of being one of the world's finest Mahler conductors. This has been further reinforced by his set of performances held at Lucerne with his hand-picked orchestra constituting the Lucerne Festival orchestra. This very large orchestra, apart from containing musicians of outstanding individual abilities, also lays great stress upon their empathy and experience with the world of chamber music. Thus is achieved the unusual combination of orchestral size allied to individual and corporate sensitivity. This suits Abbado's particular vision of Mahler and this is apparent throughout this very fine performance which some would describe as close to definitive.

This symphony used to be known as `The Song of the Night' when I first got to hear it on a recording from the 1950's. At that time my awareness of Mahler was somewhat sketchy with a good understanding of the first symphony that I had had to analyse for an exam and some passing acquaintance with the symphonies 2, 3 and 4. Performances of Mahler were rare and sought-after events back then. That was all a long time ago and the world is different now with many performances to choose from as recordings. The 7th symphony is still considered one of the trickiest to get to know.

Mahler appears to have written the two Nachtmusik movements first but they are very different in character. The first one is said to be more of an outdoor event but the second is more of an indoor event and may also have been the very first of the movements to have been written. This impression of the indoors is reinforced by the instrumentation which features a mandolin and a guitar. Many of the orchestral members are also treated soloistically. This suits the nature of Abbado's approach to making music with the orchestra of course.

The central movement is a scherzo and is a fragmentary and somewhat grotesque treatment of waltz and landler dance rhythms. The whole effect is somewhat mysterious and full of fleeting shadows, possibly ghost-like. Abbado clearly has fun conducting it.

The last movement could be described as being generally of an optimistic and joyful nature and as such contrasts with the denser and darker first movement. The progression of the symphony has been described as moving from dark to light and that concept is not difficult to follow in broad terms.

The generously spacious layout of the orchestra allows the camera work to succeed in providing both sensitive detail as well as panoramic views. This visual element makes a telling contribution as we are able to see the changing body language of the conductor which matches the concept of the progression towards light and this adds to our understanding of the sounds he brings to our attention.

The addition of images to the aural coverage of this music is a great advantage in a work such as this and Abbado and his orchestra make for compelling guides. The sound itself is presented in wide-ranging DTS 5.1 and stereo formats and captures all of this with admirable lucidity.

Abbado has an international reputation of being perhaps the leading exponent of the Mahler symphonies at this time and in particular of the 7th symphony. This is fully justified general perception and this recording should give much pleasure and satisfaction to most future purchasers. I would suggest that this disc is likely to be a leading recommendation for some long time to come.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magnificent, 24 May 2011
By 
John Chandler (Melbourne, Australia) - See all my reviews
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This is a magnificent set in every way. There is only one odd matter: Renée Fleming is listed in the final on screen credits. Of course she does not sing so do not be confused by this mastering error.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classical music at its best, 7 Mar 2014
By 
Christian Nugue "go-between" (Meudon (France)) - See all my reviews
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Claudio Abbado has been my idol for a long time. His disappearance leaves a huge gap in the world of music.
In this recording made at the Lucerne festival he shows again a great musicality, a
perfect sense of timing and a remarkable respect for the tempi suggested by the author. A joy to the ear.

I would recommend his interpretation to anyone who thinks, as I do, that Mahler deserves a slot on the list of the 10 greatest composers of all times.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Mahler at best hands, 10 Dec 2012
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This review is from: Mahler: Symphony No.7 [DVD] [2006] (DVD)
The "old" Abbado's Mahler, especially here in the 7th, is the apex of both his oeuvre and the Mahler perceptions of all time. From his view point, even the best approaches before his, seem trials and errors. Don't miss it. Abbado's Mahler explains the words of the composer 'I put all the world into all my symphonies'. I think even in this stunning series, the 7th is the greatest.
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Mahler: Symphony No.7 [DVD] [2006]
Mahler: Symphony No.7 [DVD] [2006] by Claudio Abbado (DVD - 2006)
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