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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oh Happy Day!!
It's been a long five year wait, but the new Tool album dropped onto my doormat this morning, and having now listened to it twice I can safely say two things; 1. It was well worth the wait, and 2. Maynard and the lads have surpassed themselves!

The tunes on this new CD are superb, ranging from the atmospheric thunderstorm-backed title track to balls-out heavy...
Published on 29 April 2006 by R. Pollard

versus
19 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but it's not quite right
First of all...

It's welcoming to see a whole load of proper reviews - Evidence surely that Tool fans are generally a well educated bunch (See Funeral for a friend album reviews if you wanna read "This album rocks its the best go buy it cause its well good you will love it omg i cant believe this album is amazing....) - Some nicely balanced arguements for a...
Published on 11 May 2006 by K. A. Graham


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oh Happy Day!!, 29 April 2006
By 
R. Pollard (Leeds, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
It's been a long five year wait, but the new Tool album dropped onto my doormat this morning, and having now listened to it twice I can safely say two things; 1. It was well worth the wait, and 2. Maynard and the lads have surpassed themselves!

The tunes on this new CD are superb, ranging from the atmospheric thunderstorm-backed title track to balls-out heavy stuff like Jambi, all with their usual complexities and wierd time signatures! Maynard's voice just gets better and better, there are times on this CD where he sings unlike I've ever heard him before with Tool or A Perfect Circle.

Contrary to the first review here, the titles and artwork are not fake, the titles are as they appear here, the cover is slightly different.

Speaking of which, the CD case design is outstanding but quite difficult to describe. The case contains two lenses which when folded out and looked through, the inside booklet gives a series of stereoscopic pictures of the band and the gorgeous artwork, total class!

The only downside to this album coming out now, is that this is probably the beginning of another long wait for the next one!

Also, a lot of the other reviewers calling themselves long-term Tool fans are moaning about the soundscape 'fillers' on here such as 'Lipan Conjuring' and 'Vigniti Tres', have they forgotten there have been tracks like this on EVERY Tool album? Remember 'Disgustipated' on Undertow (strange diatribe on vegetables taking over!), 'ions(-)' on Aenima (3 minutes of electrical buzzing!) or 'Faaip de Oiad' on Lateralus (some guy blubbing about being abducted by aliens!)??
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Give me my Wings, 30 April 2007
By 
Brian Lelas "laerfan" (Chapelizod, Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
I purposely waited one year after the release of "10,000 Days" to give this review so that it would be a better indication of my feelings towards the record, rather than a quick and excited review about a hugely anticipated album.

After what felt like an eternity since 2001's incredible album "Lateralus," Tool unleashed their most progressive album to date in the form of "10,000 Days." The album was shrouded in secrecy, as is Tool's way, revealing very little other than the track names a short few weeks before the album's release.

It quickly surfaced that the album's title was related to the amount of time lead singer Maynard James Keenan's mother spent paralysed from the neck down, and the album's longest duo of tracks "Wings For Marie / 10,000 Days" is a surprisingly touching yet angry account of that story. Clocking in at a collective 17 and a half minutes, the duo is an epic Tool song, so different to anything they've done before, a live masterpiece and by far and away the best thing on this album. Fans were slow to warm to the track but all eventually come around to its sheer strength, vocal complexity and lyrical and emotional power.

The album itself, in its entirety, is a revelation, much like "Lateralus" was and "Aenima" was before that. Opening with powerhouse radio single "Vicarious," the album starts with a roar and continues its charge through second song, live favourite "Jambi." After the assault on the senses that is "Wings For Marie / 10,000 Days," fans experience Maynard James Keenan's highest vocal attempt yet, the unusually apt "The Pot," which boils with energy reminiscent of the "Undertow" days.

The enigmatic "Rosetta Stoned" oozes with drug-induced paranoia and is the heaviest guitar track Tool have done since "Aenema" nearly ten years ago. The song must be heard to be believed, sporting various different vocal styles and an even more prolific variance is rhythms and styles thoughout.

The album's second-to-last track, "Right In Two" is possibly the band's most ingenius lyric writing showcase to date with unforgettable comparisons between human beings of today and our ancient monkey ancestors, with some interesting comparisons unmistakeably drawn together.

The only negative thing I can say about "10,000 Days" is a common complaint I have about Tool's records despite being a huge, huge fan, and while a bit nit-picky, it is regarding their shallow attempts at expanding the CD length by pouring the likes of "Viginti Tres," a four minute distorted sound that leaves the album ending on a particularly low point after such a strong start and fantastic run all the way through. One wonders why "Viginti Tres" is even there.

But that is a very minute scuff on the shining trophy that is "10,000 Days," in my opinion, one the best album released since Tool's own "Lateralus" in 2001. Every song (proper song!) is conpletely stunning and entirely different from the next and people will be listening to this record for decades to come.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All righty then. Picture this, if you will..., 15 July 2011
By 
Crookedmouth ":-/" (Somewhere in the Jurassic...) - See all my reviews
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
My impression is that of Tool's two most recent albums, this tends to win out in reviews (just) over its predecessor Lateralus. I personally prefer the unrelenting rawness of Lateralus (although it tends to tail off after the title track) but there really isn't much in it.

I'm not much cop at musical critiques and I find it hard to describe music in a way that others can relate to, but perhaps that's just exacerbated by the pervading strangeness of Tool's work. To label it as Progressive Metal may mean something to someone (but not to me - I have no conscious experience of PM other than Tool) but even if it did, it does the album (or their body of work) no justice whatever: partly because of that strangeness but more so because 10,000 days is such a varied piece of work.

It swings wildly from the powerful hard metal of the openers, Vicarious and Jambi, to the (slightly) more sedate Wings duo and then back again (The Pot, Rosetta Stoned) and so-on. Vicarious is probably my favourite track on the album, raging as it does against the pernicious sway that public media (televison, newspapers and the like) holds over us. The vicious and complex riffing of Adam Jones' guitar-work provides a gorgeous backdrop to Maynard Keenan's anguished vocals. It is very well worth looking up the music video that went with this track. Adam Jones, the bassist, is primarily responsible for the band's videos and they are all surreal, deeply disturbing and jawdroppingly imaginitive. It is clear that they mean something, but I really don't ever want to find out exactly what and the Vicarious video is no exception.

By contrast, Intension, towards the end of the album is a good example of Tool at their more restrained. When I say 'restrained', I am thinking of Hannibal Lecter, strapped to a barrel-trolley and wearing a bite mask. This bass and drum led track may initially sound like slightly creepy elevator music but the pent up, barely controlled menace is spine tingling stuff.

Jumping back a few, we find the second strangest track on the album - Lost Keys/Rosetta Stoned. These are actually two closely linked tracks. Lost Keys sets the scene and is little more than a dialogue (with instrumental backing) between a Doctor and Nurse about a mysterious admission. What follows, in Rosetta Stoned, is a mescaline fuelled X-files horror-rap as the patient recounts his abduction by aliens. It's an astonishing, breakneck, larynx stretching vocal performance, backed by some of the most intense axework* that you'll hear anywhere...

...no, I mean that. Anywhere.

The strangest track is the last - Viginti Tres. Is it music or is it simply radio transmissions leaking from some distant sound-dimension populated only by a lonely, tormented man-beast? I think we need to be told. It evokes the sort of images and soundscapes that Lustmord is so good at and it's probably not best listened to in the dark.

I gave Lateralus 5 stars. 10,000 Days gets a half star knocked off for being less "consistent" (to my untutored ears), but by golly, I'm glad that I have to round that 4.5 up to 5 stars overall.

Strapped down my bed.
Feet cold and eyes red.
I'm out my head.
Am I alive, am I dead?
Sunkist and Sudafed, gyroscopes and infrared.
Won't help, brain dead.
Can't remember what they said.
God d@mn $hit the bed!

*Ably supported, of course, by Danny Carey who seems to be playing his drums with baseball bats.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Difficult, 5 May 2006
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
Before we go any further, this is an entirely different beast to the other Tool albums, with the exception of Vicarious(the album's opener), which smacks of Lateralus and serves as a nice bridge between the two albums. Jambi continues the theme but feels more tribal, mainly due to Adam Jones's insteresting triplet based riff.
Fans expecting Lateralus II may be disappointed. Anyone with no preconceptions of what this album *should* sound like will be rewarded with one of the finest pieces of music to be released this decade.
Tool once again display absolute mastery of their craft. Polyrhtyhmic, dense, atmospheric, painfully personal lyrics healthily mixed with trademark cynicism.
Tool sound like an army rather than a band, the production is first rate and while Maynard's voice is less prominent in the mix this time around, the quality of his voice is staggering. His range seems to have improved as well (espec. on "The Pot")
I bought this cd, put it in my player and thought "not sure".
5 listens later and I have to say it is one of the most intense and complete musical "trips" I have encountered since....oh I don't know.....the last Tool album ;)Buy it.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Combination Of The Old, 3 Jun. 2006
By 
Tom Chase (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
Tool's new album is more a combination of the old styles than a searching for a new one. The album is aggressive at times, recalling the grittier, fuming Aenima days. But it also has a more developed progressive styling, which strikes me as an evolution from the more complex structures of Lateralus. The production is very crisp, the album art is quite unique with its 3D lenses and overall a nice package with heavy influence on the works of Alex Grey.

My first impression of the album was that it drifts off about halfway through. It is a monster, clocking in at nearly a CD max, it will certainly test the patience of some fans, even the most rabid. After kicking off with "Vicarious" and "Jambi" I was impressed. Both songs are very solid, very tight and fuse the more complex structuring of Lateralus with heavier, more `rocking' sections, akin to Aenima.

Then comes the real first surprise, the "Wings" two-part epic clocking in at nearly 20 minutes. Tool fans are used to long pieces, such as Third Eye and the Disposition/Reflection/Triad masterpiece, but this is something much more drawn out, far more progressive. I was swamped in the song. Completely in awe at the wondrous build-up work, the sincere emotional delivery of MJK and especially the magnificent, spine-tingling moment when he sings "10,000 days in the fire is long enough, you're coming home". A truly fantastic piece, and it struck me, on first listen, as Tool's finest.

The rest of the album had to grow on me. "The Pot" did not impress me at first, but I have gradually come round to it, and especially enjoy the heavy chugging middle section. After "build-up fillers" as I would like to call them, small statements linking the album together such as "Lipan Conjuring" and "Lost Keys" pass, "Rosetta Stoned" crunches in. This is the other enlarged progressive piece of the album, except this one is downright heavy and full of twisting guitar and drum motifs. The song for me really only gets going at the midway interlude where the band slow things down, Pushit style (from the album Aenima for those unaware of what I mean). The song then progresses and builds to sumptuous close.

The same can be said for the last full track on the album, "Right In Two". Again this grew on me after leaving a rather mediocre first impression. Now it is up there with the `Wings' piece as my favorite moments. This is a true Tool song. Brooding and slow to start with, it erupts into wave after wave of distorted riffing and drum pummelling that borders on the insane. A fine way to finish the album.

So, overall this is a great Tool album. Danny is on top form as ever, MJK's voice is just as haunting, Justin is probably more prominent than ever with his grumbling lines and Adam creates catchy riffs and good chugging parts. Whether it tops Aenima and Lateralus I think time will tell for me. All I can say is, give it a few listens and things that initially disappointed may well surprise you.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ITS MUSIC FOR GODS SAKE, 15 April 2008
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
I tend to agree with Mikey all this pontification about what Tool songs mean or don't mean or whether tool is a metaphor for living a certain way blah blahblah is pointless. I am a massve Tool fan and have seen their musical scale and scope grow since the early nineties into what has to be said a fantastic album in 10,000 days which is a real grower unfairly criticised by a lot of you on Amazon early on release but......... I don't hang on their every word, know all their views on climate change, when they were born or whether they talk in riddles and nor do I look for little gimmicky types of hippyesque quotes or stuff from the band. The most important thing is that the music is so unique that it moves you just like opera does. I can't speak Italian or understand the lyrics of some operas but still feel the power of arrangements or muscial changes. So, it is the same with Tool who have an unbelieveably diverse and distinctive vocalist like Maynard. Tool just work musically. They are one of those phenomena. I can't wait to listen to Tool most days, they excite me musically, but I don't for one minute think that we should worship at the altar of Tool and put them on a pedastal. I've got a feeling that most of the fans actually think they are a load of xxxxxxx but all I am interested in that they continue to produce music of the quality they can in the existing dire musical scene of drivel and mediocrity.

I also think that it is about time they actually produced a high quality live dvd recording for the fans that have bought their music and followed their progress for years, if indeed they are bothered. I hope it isn't arrogance or a sense of skewed commercialism that is stopping them from doing this as most fans I speak to want this. They will undoubtabley be referenced as one of the greatest bands of recent years and for years to come, they deserve it for their music, they are just excellent and I can't think of a tool song I can't listen to but lets have a little restraint on the fan worship and over analysing that typifies a lot of Tool fans
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A reflective Tool, 1 May 2006
By 
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
You're going to be a bit disappointed when you first hear this. But the same was true of Lateralus. Tool has evolved again, and again it's a little bit of an effort to shift with them. The album starts out with Vicarious, which goes straight into the song. No tantric intro, no ethnic sounds. The sound is instantly recognisable as Tool and the theme is straight forward enough, but you get the idea that Tool have got rid of the "them and us". Maynard is actually singing about himself, you and me. It's not the derisory sneer of Aenema, far more confessional. Jambi comes in hard. I'm not hooked on it yet, but sure that it will grow. The centre of the album is the two part Wings for Marie/10,000 Days. It is simply stunning. Together the songs rack up over quarter of an hour, but they fly past as the themes repeat and build, until you get the trademark Tool pay-out. The Pot starts out with some very unusual vocals. It's going to be hard to accept that you'll grow to love them, but give it a chance, you will.Next comes the only problem with the album, quite a large stretch of filler. Lipan Conjuring and Lost Keys are both filler tracks, although Lost Keys has quite a poignant theme to it and leads well into Rosetta Stoned which has the new lyric for the teens to cheer (God damn, s**t the bed). To me it doesn't quite fire, and is the only song on the album where you start to notice the length. Intension is a good prelude to Right In Two, which is back to the excellent level you expect from Tool. Viginti Tres finshes the album off with the trademark Tool creepy outro theme. I think this one might be the scariest yet. Frightens me anyway. Overall the album is stunning, the only downside (though not enough to warrant removing a star) is that there doesn't seem to be much of it. Whereas Lateralus seemed to be jam packed with music, walking away after listening to 10,000 Days you feel there's one song missing somewhere. In the same way as Aenema lost it's way somewhat after 46&2 and then picked up later aropund Push-It, 10,000 Days seems to meander a little in the middle before finding its feet again for Right In Two. The album as a whole though is centred around the Title track, and it has to be Tool's finest moment. Hands down. This isn't the angsty, angry Tool. Teens are going to find it tough to associate with the emotions in the album. As evidenced by the rather dodgy band shots (nice packaging by the way), Tool are getting older, and the music is travelling with them. One for the old fans perhaps.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this if you're new to Tool, 7 May 2006
By 
N. Evans (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
There seems to be a tendency to compare 10,000 Days to other Tool material, however I urge the discerning music-lover to ignore all the comparisons and approach each album individually. Tool has managed, yet again, to push the boundaries and deliver a truly amazing album that deserves your time. It may not 'make sense' on the first few listenings, but persevere and you will enter a world of musical mastery unlike anything you will have experienced before. And one from which you will never look back. Whether you are into rock, metal, 'progressive' (whatever that really is), industrial or whatever - this album should be in your collection. You will read other reviews picking apart each and every track, but I strongly urge you not to take any notice, buy this album, stick it in your CD player and listen to it non-stop from beginning to end. Then, and only then, start to make sense of it yourself. The less pre-conceptions you have about this album (and any Tool album) the better. What you think of 10,000 Days is all that matters, and with Tool especially you're unlikely to come to exactly the same conclusions as someone else.

All I will say is that you will not be disappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This album changed the way I percieve music, 11 Nov. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
I'm not fantastic on reviewing music so I will keep it brief.

This is by far one of my favorite albums of all time. Definately one of my desert island disks. This album will be a huge inspiration to any Tool fan and is a must have for any prog metal fan. This album takes you on a journey that will stay with you. You have to hand it to Tool for creating a work of art such as this and you can appreiate the amount of time and effort that they put into this.

I'd pay 10x it's worth.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely superb, 27 April 2006
By 
This review is from: 10,000 Days (Audio CD)
Rather than continue listening to Tool-like bands to fill the gulf, pick this CD up and improve your mental well-being.

It's been a long time coming but it's definitely worth the wait. If you were worrying that Tool might have been inclined to head off at a musical tangent then you should put your mind at rest. This is a superb collection of tracks.

I've listened to it a good half dozen times now and I can't decide on my favourite tracks. There's nothing I can say I don't like, and that's unusual for me. I won't go track by track, but the high points for me are;

Vicarious is a powerful intro track.

Jambi has some meaty, instantly likeable riffs.

The Pot is very good too, particularly as it is kicked off solely with vocals.

10,000 days is an astounding piece of music, a real standout track, which evokes so much emotion.

I'm a longtime Tool fan and I'm proud of this album.
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