Customer Reviews


16 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fitting swansong
In January, after ten years, four albums and citing the reliable stand-by of 'irreconcilable differences', Grandaddy decided to call it a day. However, despite announcing their break-up, the band decided to record Just Like The Fambly Cat as their swansong. The result is an album that, due to its variety, is the perfect distillation of the Grandaddy experience - so much...
Published on 5 May 2006 by J. W. Bassett

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dave B
I have to admit to being a little disappointed with this album!

Grandaddy have been one of my long time favourite bands. The Sophtware Slump is a classic album and Sumday not far behind it!

Unfortunately "Fambly Cat" is nowhere near as inspired. From the utterly irritating opening track 'What Happened'the album just fails to spark into life. It does...
Published on 29 Aug 2006 by C. A. Bartram


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fitting swansong, 5 May 2006
By 
J. W. Bassett (Kent, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
In January, after ten years, four albums and citing the reliable stand-by of 'irreconcilable differences', Grandaddy decided to call it a day. However, despite announcing their break-up, the band decided to record Just Like The Fambly Cat as their swansong. The result is an album that, due to its variety, is the perfect distillation of the Grandaddy experience - so much so that it could easily be a greatest hits package, were it not for the fact that all of the songs are new.

Beginning with a gentle piano refrain, Just Like The Fambly Cat opens with the same sadness and trepidation that one should expect for the final installment of Grandaddy's musical odyssey, but from thereon in the band run the gamut of their sound. So, while there's plenty of invention, many of the tracks pay homage to songs previously released by the band.

In fact, Jason Lytle and his band even retreat as far back as their relatively obscure, lo-fi debut, A Pretty Mess By This One Band, on Skateboarding Saves Me Twice, Jeez Louise is the perfect pop song with which the band made their name and easily the equal of A.M. 180 from their sublime full-length debut, Under The Western Freeway, and Elevate Myself too recalls the funky, fuzzed-out soundscapes of their full-length debut. Summer... It's Gone, meanwhile, is the forlorn cousin of their 1997 breakthrough single, Summer Here Kids. If that single marked Grandaddy's arrival, then Summer... It's Gone is, perhaps the perfect farewell.

Last year's Excerpts From The Diary Of Todd Zilla, with its emocore leanings, was an indication that band leader Jason Lytle was still prepared to try new things, and Just Like The Fambly Cat does occasionally push in new directions - witness the thrash punk of 50% and the operatic album closer, Shangri-La - but no matter what genre the band mould for themselves, the subject matter comes as little surprise. With their final album, Grandaddy finally pull themselves away from the technology dominated world that they lambasted on their seminal album, The Sophtware Slump. The Animal World, with its barking dogs and chirruping birds, marks the beginning of this journey towards a more organic place, while the dreamy Guide Down Denied is also concluded with the sound of a dog barking.

Lyrically, Lytle doesn't give much away, but the reflective Where I'm Anymore has him admit, "I don't know where I'm anymore", and the dominant refrain of the six-and-a-half minute drama of album closer This Is How It Always Starts - the beautiful and fitting Shangri-La outro goes unmentioned on the album's sleeve - is, "Oh shit, I can't let them see me like this".

Taken purely on its musical merits, Just Like The Fambly Cat is an album where astral synths fuse with acoustic guitars to form a distorted pop framework; where its creators, ambitious as ever, reach further than perhaps it is wise to. But, more than anything else, it's Grandaddy's final album and as such, was doomed to perfection from the start.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars RIP Grandaddy., 28 May 2006
By 
S. G. Warner "pictobug" (Elgin, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
I've only listened to this two or three times since getting it but it's well on its way to being my favourite Grandaddy album. It's not as samey as Sumday (brilliant though Sumday is) and perhaps for the un-initiated, slightly more accessible than The Sophtware Slump (another classic) but it's absolutely un-mistakably Grandaddy, and for that I am truly grateful.

Basically if you like Grandaddy you'll love this, if you don't like Grandaddy, there's something wrong with you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What happened? A moronic public, that's what!, 11 Dec 2006
By 
A. Provan "Bolt Vanderhuge" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
And so Grandaddy pass off into the sunset, beaten by apathy. Thankfully they aren't going with the tail between their legs. Just Like the Fambly Cat is a mighty roar of a final album, when all that could have been expected was a whimper.

The signs didn't look good for this final album, what with the band on the verge of splitting up and last year's mini-album Excerpts From the Diary of Todd Zilla being a lacklustre effort saved by two or three tunes. Add to this the fact that the band's last full length album Sumday was easily their worst, too bloated and plodding after the frankly thrilling first two efforts, and it looked as if this once great band were going to destroy the good reputation they had deservedly built for themselves.

Thankfully Fambly Cat proves to be a fitting epitaph for the band, an adrenaline rush that makes you lament the fact that the band are already doomed. The album does what the earlier Grandaddy releases done with ease, a combination of cracking little rocky pop numbers with some sad, beautiful songs that really complimented Jason Lyttle's voice, all the time retaining a sense of humour and playfulness, something that Sumday sadly missed.

Of the rock numbers Disconnecty and Geez Louise are great pop and Rear View Mirror demonstrates more verve than at any other point in the band's career and is a candidate for their best song. Where I'm Anymore and This is How it Always Starts are heart breaking. The album does make a couple of mis-steps, the opener and 50% being particularly poor, and the curse of Sumday rears its ugly head again in the shape that the album is a little too bloated. It could have done with a little trimming but its easy to see why the band would want to include as much as possible.

So it isn't perfect, but then that's kind of the point when it comes to Grandaddy, so top marks for a fitting last album. They'll be sorely missed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A sad day for music, 24 May 2006
By 
Gigs (Christchurch, Dorset United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
So here it is then. Grandaddys swansong. Without a doubt this is one group that deserved more acclaim for there work than they ever recieved. In my opinion they have released one Bona fide classic in The Sophtware Slump, and all of there other work is right up with the best.

Frequently (Wrongly...)compared to the Flaming Lips, Grandaddy have decided that after years slogging it out, they dont have the money or the inclination to do it anymore. This is so sad when you consider some of the dross which is clogging up the airwaves and mp3 players of the world. They have a song for every emotion, and this album is no different.

The opener is typical Grandaddy, with the childs voice and a fuzzy background piano. This leads into Jeez Louise, which is great. Other high points for me are the sublime Rear view mirror, Elevate myself, and of course This is how it always starts.

An anorac note for hidden track 15. When the band did a signing for Sumday at a record store in Sydney my brother went along and ended up talking to Jason Lyttle for a good 30 mins. They discussed a mutual love of ELO. Track 15 is Shangri La, an ELO tune taken from A New World record. It fits beautifully, just like the band always did.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Going out on a high, 23 May 2006
By 
Mr. TG Crawshaw "crawstgc" (Lincoln, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
I love these guys. I love their sense of fun. I love the lavish production and the "full" sound. I love the quirky bits - the unusual sounds which add a richness to the end product. I have loved watching them perform live and I'm really sad that i won't get the chance to see them again. They have produced some of the best music in my collection over the last 10 years and this album is right up their as well.

OK this is not as coherent or consistently brilliant as "The Sophtware Slump", but few albums are. For me The Sophtware Slump and, to some extent, Under the Western Freeway, had something extra which held them together. The "whole" was greater than the sum of the parts. "Sumday" disappointed me because it lacked that something extra binding it together as a complete piece of work and it smacked of a collection of more accessible, commercial songs in a last desperate bid for success. The Fambly Cat is more coherent and is aimed more at the core Grandaddy fan, rather than trying to convert new ones. There are some great tracks and it leaves you wondering why they are not a household name, particularly with such an impressive back catelogue. If they had been called something more "cool" beginning with "The...", surely they would have done better!

The hidden track at the end is worth finding, too - an album track by ELO, which I had not heard since the seventies.

I hope this album gets them some of the recognition they deserve and I hope they cash in with a "Greatest Hits" album. Finally, I hope that Jason continues to write the mixture of beautiful and indescribable songs, albeit in a different setting. I'll certainly be watching out for any future projects.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure Americana..., 19 Feb 2007
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
One facet of Grandaddy's music is consistently overlooked by critics and reviewers: that this is profoundly *American* music; it is the truest expression and "sound" of a warm American Summertime afternoon since Pet Sounds, complete with lawn mowers, sprinklers spinning around, and crickets in the cool evening. Grandaddy owe more to The Band, Big Star, the Velvets, Dylan, Gram Parsons, and the 13th Floor Elevators than they do Radiohead, the Flaming Lips, and Mercury Rev.

And this, their final LP, is easily as good as anything in their back catalog, though, as everyone notes, it is more complex, more inaccessible, and generally harder to "get". They seem to have pulled out all the stops to be as sonically bold and challenging as possible, and it certainly pays off to the careful listener.

One of the few genuinely *important* bands of the last 25 years...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bye Bye Daddies, Bye Bye ..., 26 May 2006
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
So it goes, but where its going, no one knows. Thanks for the music, Grandaddy, you live in our hearts. Some bands are bigger than the music, they are ideas of other places & ways, Grandaddy had that

To cut to the chase : This is a great album, for me Grandaddy's 2nd best after the probably perfect "Under The Western Freeway". "Fambly Cat" has all that you love in Grandaddy :- Beauty, grandeur, sadness, desolation & a little skate punk.

Truly, these people were the b*sta*d sons of the Beach Boys ... great melodies, sometimes rich arrangements, but always LO-FI hearts

Stay free
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dave B, 29 Aug 2006
By 
C. A. Bartram "bartdch" (Leicester UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
I have to admit to being a little disappointed with this album!

Grandaddy have been one of my long time favourite bands. The Sophtware Slump is a classic album and Sumday not far behind it!

Unfortunately "Fambly Cat" is nowhere near as inspired. From the utterly irritating opening track 'What Happened'the album just fails to spark into life. It does have it's moments however, but just doesn't quite make it, leaving you posing the same question 'What Happened?'!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars goodbye and thanks, 28 July 2006
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
Grandaddy were not a flaming lips cover band. They were part of a musical trend that involved the lips & mercury rev. And they were just as good. This is a great album, although i've deleted the opening track & 50% from my i pod the rest is as good as Sumday, which is their best album is'nt it ? Rear view mirror & Summer.... are up there with classic Grandaddy tracks. So long Grandaddy, when can we expect jason's first "solo" outing ?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Glass half full, 23 Oct 2006
By 
A. Smith "Adamsez" (London, England United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Just like The Fambly Cat (Audio CD)
I just love Grandaddy's sweeping, circling anthems. I'd happily let the best loop away for hours on end. Eight on Sophtware made it onto my iPod, and five from this collection. So there's your answer. Fambly Cat is five-eighths as good as Sophtware.

Just listening to 2000 Man again. Boy, does this remind me of Everybody's Got To Learn Sometime.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Just like The Fambly Cat
Just like The Fambly Cat by Grandaddy (Audio CD - 2006)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews