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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All good things...
Just to point out, this is a review of the whole series as bought in these slimline editions, and not just Season Seven.

Yes, I'm a Trekker and ain't ashamed to admit it. I can still remember the days when I used to record ST:TNG episodes every week on BBC2 onto VHS tapes (remember those?) and just I've been meaning to get the entire series on DVD for some...
Published on 28 April 2008 by Tim.T

versus
8 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Going out on top
The best thing everyone involved with ST:TNG did was end the series while it was still riding high, just like the other Paramount hit Cheers did the year before, and then moved straight onto the first of the ST:TNG movies Generations which they had already started to film while still completing the series.
Perhaps it is this, combined with the fact that the producers...
Published on 22 Dec 2002


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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All good things..., 28 April 2008
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 7 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
Just to point out, this is a review of the whole series as bought in these slimline editions, and not just Season Seven.

Yes, I'm a Trekker and ain't ashamed to admit it. I can still remember the days when I used to record ST:TNG episodes every week on BBC2 onto VHS tapes (remember those?) and just I've been meaning to get the entire series on DVD for some time. I bought the series in these slimline editions because it turned out to be cheaper than getting the actual complete box set. The only regret I have is for the poor postman who dumped SEVEN packages through my letterbox, all on one delivery!

I still can't decide which season I liked most, though I think I prefer the earlier seasons when writing was fresh and new. One of my all time favourite episodes which isn't in Season 7 but an earlier season, was 'The Offspring'. As Brent Spiner (Lt. Commander Data) himself said, that was ST:TNG at its finest and sci-fi writing at is best. Indeed.

I adore ST:TNG, and everything about it. I wanted to be sure I got the best DVD deal and these slimline editions really are. So a bit of advice: avoid the established boxsets; they are awkward to display and aren't always up to it. Instead, get the entire series in these slimline editions. They fit on the shelf nicely, and are easily accessible. Each DVD contains 4 episodes (with additional 'end-of-season' cast interviews and other interesting stuff), and there are 1 or 2 DVDs per set; and 4 sets per season. My only gripe about them (or DVDs in general) is that I object to being lectured on copyright theft before every title begins. Especially as I've just forked out over 100 for the lot! Also, once each episode ends, it goes back to the title screen; there's no 'Play all' menu option to play them conseqetively. I got around that by programming my PS2 to play them all one after the other instead. It's a bit awkward, but it works. I'm sure other conventional DVD players have the same option.

If you are a genuine Trekker at heart, you can't go wrong with these slimline editions.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the best of all STTNG seasons, 23 Mar 2009
By 
M. Jacobs "Mark Jacobs" (Harrow, Middlesex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 7 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
"Parallels" is a very disconcerting episode and you have to be very observant initially to see that things aren't quite as they seem - fractures in space-time cause Worf to experience parallel realities by jumping him from one to another very subtly at first, and then more pronouncedly. "Sub Rosa" is more of a modern ghost story, but with the Star Trek treatment - it is so well engineered an episode, that it haunts you well afterwards. Dr Beverly Krusher falls for a spirit form that behaves more like a succubus. "Thine Own Self" seems, from its description, to be another attempt at setting another episode back in Western (cowboys and injuns!) times, but it completely transcends that, and is one of the best episodes in this season. Data cannot remember anything when he awakens to find himself in a frontiers town, carrying radioactive material. He cannot even remember that radioactivity is harmful to humans, and he causes many in the town to become sick. Brent Spiner's acting ability is unquestionable in this episode - I've never seen him play Data better. Many other great episodes here, and I would say that this is slightly superior to Season 6, but only marginally.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Strong end to the evolution, 2 Jun 2004
With Star Trek traditionally being about 'boldly going where no-one has gone before', the final season rarely travels to 'strange new worlds', and instead the exploration turns inwards, searching the characters themselves. Comparing the final instalment, to the first season, the evolution of the show is obvious, the show started with a group of random people on a big ship, searching the galaxy, and ended with a group of friends, who have been through a lot together, exorcised some of their demons, and learnt a lot about themselves.
The happy endings, which were all the rage earlier in the show, are replaced by some darker episodes, ending with sometimes unresolved or only partially resolved conflicts.
Rather than tie-up the loose ends before the season finale, the show leaves us with even more questions; will Picard and Dr. Crusher ever get together, what happens to Wesley (though not everyone may want to know!!) and what happens to Ro Laren after she joins the Marquis... (admittedly, one or two of these questions are answered later in films and other series)
The final episode brings it all together, the last episode can sometimes be an anti-climax, but this one was a brilliant final legacy to the show, and gave some sense of completeness.
Recommended episodes:
Most have their merits, but watch out for: 'Descent', 'The Gambit', 'Parallels', 'The Pegasus', 'Lower Decks' and 'All Good Things...'
The DVD is well packed as usual, though after seven seasons worth of extras, some of the documentaries and interviews can get a little tedious. Still, it's nice to see that Paramount continued the effort to include loads of extras right to the end.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars awesome final series, 3 May 2007
By 
Mr. Nj Reid "nreid82" (england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 7 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
This is a brilliant final season to a fantastic show. Definately worth buying if you need to complete the set or just want a stand alone box set. This was the first one I bought and it inspired me to get the rest.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fine swansong season, 12 Dec 2011
By 
LXIX (scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 7 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
1993/1994's Series 7 of Star Trek TNG was the swansong for this hugely successful TV series. Each episode is around 42 minutes long (except the final episode which is double the usual length) and the standard is high once again; however some episodes are rather derivative of earlier tales from previous seasons. Perhaps everything has a shelf life and all good things must come to an end as they eventually run out of steam. Series 7 has a notable family theme in many episodes: Worf's brother and son, Geordi's mother, Troi's mother, Crusher's grandmother, Data's step-mother and even Picard's offspring. A few well known faces also return, including Tasha Yar, Wesley Crusher, Ro Laren, The Traveller, Q and Lor.

Extra features on the 7th dvd include Mission Overview (14 mins), A Captain's Tribute (16 mins), Production (15 mins), Starfleet Moments and Memories (30 minutes), The Making of 'All Good Things...' (17 mins), Special Profiles (15 mins), Dressing the Future (10 mins) and Deep Space Nine Preview (5 mins).

The following is a synopsis of each individual episode, ranked by how I personally rated them (from best to worst):

*Episode 25: All Good Things ... (This is a double length feature. Picard is caught between 3 time zones: the past - at the point 7 years previous when he first took command of the Enterprise, the present, and 25 years in the future. All timelines lead to a spatial anomaly in the Devron system of the Neutral Zone. In bookend fashion, this final episode can be seen as the final part of the very first TNG story, Encounter at Farpoint)

*Episode 12: The Pegasus (Admiral Pressman, Will Riker's former commanding officer, beams aboard the Enterprise to take control of a secret mission to locate their former starship, previously believed to have been destroyed in an accident 12 years ago. Picard is kept in the dark, even though the Romulans are in hot pursuit and the Enterprise is steered deep into the fissure of a large asteroid)

*Episode 18: Eye of the Beholder (A young officer, Lt. Kwan, commits suicide by throwing himself into the warp coil's plasma stream. Picard says it's the first suicide under his command, and so he orders Troi and Warf to fully investigate the background to it. What results is a tale that is part empathic and part supernatural)

*Episode 24: Pre-emptive Strike (Ro Laren returns to the Enterprise after being promoted to Lieutenant. She is asked to go undercover and infiltrate Maquis rebels who are opposing their new Cardassian overlords in the Demilitarised Zone, in a clear breach of the peace treaty between the Cardassians and the Federation)

*Episode 15: Lower Decks (A rather unusual episode in that the plot line is seen from the point of view of 4 ambitious young ensigns and, like the rest of the crew, they're in the dark about the full details of an Enterprise mission near the Cardassian border. A key figure in this story is the Bajoran, Ensign Sito Jaxa, who also featured in episode 5:19 The First Duty)

*Episode 11: Parallels (On his solo return from a Bat'leth tournament in a shuttlecraft, Worf begins to experience a number of differing realities as the Enterprise seeks to repair the Argus array. His problem appears to switch him across separate potential timelines and throws up a range of quantum realities. This episode includes the Cardassians and a guest return for Wesley Crusher)

*Episode 22: Bloodlines (Bok, a Ferengi from Picard's past, seeks him out in order to kill the 23 year old son that he never knew he had as an act of vengeance. The previously unknown Jason Vigo is therefore tracked down in order to protect him from Bok who has the power to beam aboard the Enterprise surreptitiously and at will. Picard attempts to bond with Jason under the difficult circumstances)

*Episode 20: Journey's End (Picard has the tricky diplomatic task of convincing a group of North American Indian settlers on Dorvan V that they must leave the planet due to the terms of a new border treaty between the Federation and the Cardassians. Meanwhile, Wesley Crushers links up with the Enterprise while on leave from the Academy. However, he is there in body, but not in mind)

Episode 14: Sub Rosa (While attending her grandmother's funeral on the Scottish colony planet of Caldos II, 200 light years from Earth, Beverly Crusher is seduced by an entity, Ronin, claiming to be an 800 year old Glaswegian ghost. This is probably one of the most bizarre and unusual episodes and I can understand why some people would dislike it, but I thought it had a quaint charm about it and was certainly rather different. Note that there are also plenty of Scottish clichés here - such as tartan, superstitions and even some rogue Scots mist on the bridge of the Enterprise)

Episode 13: Homeward (Worf's errant foster brother, Nikolai Rozhenko, breaks the Prime Directive by secretly beaming a village of Boraalans into the holodeck just as their planet is about to lose its atmosphere. Picard then has to work out what to do with them. This episode throws up some thought-provoking issues about how primitive races evolve and even the subject of alien abduction)

Episode 16: Thine Own Self (While attempting to recover some radioactive samples that crashed on Barkon IV, a planet with a pre-industrial population, Data is damaged and wanders into a local village. There, he is befriended by a family who call him Jayden. However, the locals start to fall ill due to his radioactive metal samples and begin to turn against him)

*Episode 21: Firstborn (Worf has problems getting his son, Alexander, to take part in the Klingon Rite of Ascension. An unexpected Klingon helper arrives on the scene and saves Worf from an assassination attempt while he is visiting a festival. He also tries to influence Alexander to embrace his heritage - with some surprising results. This is the main obligatory Klingon episode of series 7)

*Episode 23: Emergence (The Enterprise develops its own artificial intelligence systems to the extent that it tries to create a new life form. The ship's systems malfunction in the process, as the main computer uses a holodeck analogy involving the Orient Express train and a mash-up of 6 other holodeck programmes to go about its single minded business)

*Episode 10: Inheritance (While on a mission to help stabilise the core of Altrea IV, Data encounters Dr. Juliana Tainer, who claims to be the former wife of Dr. Noonian Soong and therefore his mother figure)

*Episode 5: Gambit Part 2 (A tale of intrigue and subterfuge unravels as Picard remains undercover on a pirate starship, with Riker also being held prisoner on board. A Vulcan agent adds to the plot mix as the renegades seek to piece together the magical components of an ancient Vulcan artefact)

*Episode 6: Phantasms (While the Enterprise is drifting in space due to problems in bringing a new warp coil online, Data experiences powerful nightmares, including at times when he is on duty and in the waking state. The dreams become increasingly dangerous and his erratic behaviour appears to be indicative of a broader problem on board)

*Episode 3: Interface (The Enterprise develops a new interface set-up that allows La Forge to work remotely on dangerous missions using a virtual reality type of suit that connects to his neural networks. Against Picard's orders, he immediately puts this to use while attempting to search for his mother's lost star ship, Hera, on a dangerous gaseous planet)

*Episode 9: Force of Nature (This episode is a parody of man-made environmental impact. While searching a corridor of space for a missing Starfleet vessel, the Enterprise is disabled by two local scientists who are seeking to prove that warp drive technology is gradually causing damaging rifts in space. The Ferengi make a cameo appearance in this epsiode)

*Episode 1: Descent Part 2 (Last season's cliff-hanger follow-up sees Picard, Troi and L Forge held as prisoners of Lore's new independently minded Borg group while Crusher is left in command of the Enterprise. Data's state of mind, and Lore's hold over him, appears to be key to their predicament and also the route to a potential resolution)

*Episode 4: Gambit Part 1 (Picard is believed to have been vaporised in a barroom brawl while engaged in archaeological research on shore leave. In their quest to catch his killers, Riker is then kidnapped on an away mission by a band of renegade space hoppers who are stealing artefacts of great significance to the Romulans)

*Episode 2: Liaisons (A group of Lyaaran ambassadors - with rather unusual behavioural habits - arrive aboard the Enterprise for a cultural exchange and fact-finding mission. Picard, meanwhile, sets off for a visit to their planet, but his plans go awry and a Kathy Bates-Misery type scenario unfolds)

*Episode 8: Attached (Picard and Crusher are kidnapped while transporting to the planet Kesprytt 3 for diplomatic talks. Their thoughts are then relayed to each other through a brain device. Meanwhile Riker is left on the Enterprise with the unenviable task of trying to bring together 2 feuding local groups - the Kes and the Prytt. This episode was written by Nick Sagan, the son of Carl Sagan)

*Episode7: Dark Page (Lwaxana Troi falls ill aboard the Enterprise while preparing several delegates from another telepathic race, The Cairn, for talks with the Federation. Her brain illness is difficult to diagnose, so Deanna Troi delves into her mother's metaconscious state and uncovers a dark chapter in the family's past)

*Episode 19: Genesis (This episode was the directorial debut for Gates McFadden. Picard and Data return from tracking down a stray photon torpedo in a shuttlecraft and find that an unusual virus has swept through the Enterprise. It triggers changes to DNA and has de-evolved the crew members back to primitive life forms such as spiders, amphibians and early hominids)

*Episode 17: Masks (The Enterprise is snared by an 87 million year old ancient monument in space that is disguised as a rogue comet. An ancient civilisation then starts to take over the ship's systems and gradually convert it into one of their cities. Data, meanwhile, assumes their many personalities. A very bizarre episode and one that never really worked)
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Star Trek The Next Generation, 13 Nov 2007
By 
Mr. B. Craggs (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 7 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
I don't think there will ever be as consistently well written a science fiction series as The Next Generation.

A superb achievement by the scriptwriters and acting talent.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 18 April 2009
By 
A. J. Kirkham - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Star Trek The Next Generation - Season 7 (Slimline Edition) [DVD] (DVD)
I think that unlike most tv series of the era, ST TNG never had a full story arc which some see as a downfall but in fact, TNG just has 178 amazing episodes of new exciting aliens, technologies and adventures. S7 is no different. Its amazing in that all the characters get their own story and say, the special features are good and the last episode would make you cry if you didn't know that the cat and crew return for the movies. Really good and a must for any Star Trek fan.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing viewing, 16 Jan 2004
By 
D. KNIGHTS (Berkshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This series is one of the best in the Star Trek franchise. It has tension, suspense, and ties the loose ends of wat has been an institution.
The box set is fully equiped to present the remarkable material - with excellent extra features, including some moving interviews with the cast and interesting insights into the making of the episodes. The quality of viewing is superb, and this only compliments the sheer brilliance of this season. A fitting end to what has been a gripping story!!
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19 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Final send-off, 26 Dec 2002
By 
Admir (Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina) - See all my reviews
It's a great show.
It really was worth watching all seven years. And now we've slowly come to an end and it is really sad to part from the weekly adventures of the bold crew that was on USS Enterprise 1701-D.
I admit, it is fiction, but it is hell of a ride through scientific fiction. It was educational, emotional, overwhelming. And as Spock would say, fascinating.
All Good Thigs [must end] was, ironically, the episode title for the final two-parter which featured everything that fans wanted combined in an episode. Excellent writing, which earned several awards, gave Q a role that actually set continuity in the whole series and Q was the one that had the honors to engage the stories and to end them in style, as he did in "All Good Things".
Season 7 isn't the best what TNG had to offer but it had somewhat weird stories dealing with the inner parts of the charachters. The DVD box-set is, as usual, packed with standard stuff, such as the:
Mission Overview: Year Seven
which takes us over the most memorable missions of this season.
A Captain's Tribute
a real gem with Patrick Stewart where he talks about the experiences with the cast and crew over the past seven years.
Departmental Briefing: Production
of an episode directed by Gates McFadden and Brannon Braga bragging about how well he writes episodes:).
Starfleet Memories and Moments
it was the best of the times, it was the worst of times. All the fun and magic captured on the set.
The Making of "All Good Things..."
The title says it all. This episode will really knock you out with quality!
It was a wonderful ride. Farewell and don't forget to live long and prosper!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Happy trails to NexGen, 12 May 2004
By 
Zagnorch (Terra, Sol System) - See all my reviews
Even if there hadn't been any advance announcements that the seventh season of NextGen was gonna be the last, you'd have been reasonably able to see the writing on the wall by simply watching the eppies that eventually led to the show's swan song. Delving further into the family lives of some of the crewmates was one indicator of the fat lady gettin' ready to belt out her tune. You have LaForge™ attempting to rescue his mother from a "ghost ship" in 'Interface'. Worf clashes once again (for the first time on the show, however) with his human brother Nikolai in 'Homeward'. Counselor Troi reaches into the confines of her comatose mother's mind to discover a hidden family tragedy in 'Dark Page', which I found to be quite jarring, despite my less-than-friendly opinions about the Lwaxana Troi character.
Another harbinger was the shows that sought to bring closure to the series' various open ends. The most dramatic of the seventh season's "tie-'em-up" eppies is 'Attached', where an implanted mental link forces Jean-Luc and Dr. Crusher to reveal their previously-hidden romantic feelings for each other. Will the good captain and lovely ship's physician, shall we say, consummate these mutual feelings and desires before the closing credits start rolling? You're just gonna have to find out for yourself...
A few other good seventh-season shows (and a few silly ones as well) worth taking a look at:
- 'Lower Decks': a look at the lives of a few of the Enterprise's junior officers, one of whom must overcome her disgrace in the eyes of Captain Picard.
- 'Force of Nature': the eppie that established a "speed-limit" for all warp-drive vessels in the Alpha Quadrant.
- 'Pre-emptive Strike': The return of Ro as she infiltrates a cell of Maquis freedom fighters and finds her burgeoning sympathy for their cause conflicting with her sworn duties as a Starfleet officer.
- 'Genesis': Picard and Data race against the clock to reverse the de-evolution of their crewmates. Are they not men...?
- 'Parallels': After realizing he shifting through endless parallel realities, Worf struggles to find his way back to his own reality.
- 'All Good Things...': Saving the absolute best of the final season for last, the omnipotent super-entity Q throws his ultimate challenge at Picard, with the very existence of humanity at stake! If ever there was a perfect signoff for one of pop culture's greatest hits, this double-length show comes pretty close.
But, let's not forget the klinkers that sometimes made NextGen's final year a painful one to witness. 'Sub Rosa' takes a look at Beverly's family 'curse' in a cheesy dime-store romance novel kind of way. The two-part cliffhanger 'Gambit', an attempt to make Picard into more of an action-oriented captain in the spirit of Jim Kirk, didn't exactly get my adrenalin goin'. Especially pathetic was 'Journey's End', featuring the return of Wussley-- whoops, I mean Wesley Crusher as he finally discovers his true destiny as he decides to drop out of Starfleet Academy (YAY!) and learns to harness and control his 'travelling' powers (BOO!). And if that ain't bad enough, you'll be "treated" to Wil "Wussley" Wheaton pontificating on his character's evolution in disc 7's supplemental materials. As if any self-respecting NextGen geekoid actually cares...
Speakin' of the supplemental materials: If you're itchin' to watch sappy and way-too-self-congratulatory 'love-fest'-style interviews with the cast & crew, you'll likely enjoy the Special Features that are contained on platter number seven. Y'know, I really like these actors, producers, writers, etc. and all that, but for once I'd like to hear one of 'em say something even slightly denigrating about a fellow NextGen cast-/crew-mate. Wouldn't it be great if LeVar Burton made remark about Michael Dorn's lazy eye creepin' him out? Or Brent Spiner making cracks about Jonathan Frakes' penchant for striking an overly-dramatic pose right before a station break on every other episode? Then Frakes could counter by stating his annoyance with Spiner's incessant Jimmy Stewart impressions? Now, THAT would make for some truly interesting interviews! Hey, you don't want the old-school crew to have all the fun with their mutual enmity towards William Shatner now, do ya?
As I expected, the sound quality of each episode is really good, far better than their preceding VHS presentations. The subtle background sounds are more perceptible. I found the picture quality to be very sharp most of the time, and pretty good (but not perfect) the rest of the time. There are a few parts here and there that looked a bit grainy. There are a few scenes here and there that appear somewhat grainy, but I believe this is due more to the quality of the source material rather than that of the digital transfer.
'Late
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